Porsche introduced its 2021 911 Turbo S Coupe and Cabriolet just two months ago, and now we’re getting a look at what’s in store for 911 Carrera, Carrera S, and Carrera 4S trims. The latter two S…

Porsche updates 911 Carrera for 2021

2021 Porsche 911 Carrera S
911 Carrera S and 4S models will be available with a 7-speed manual for 2021.

Porsche introduced its 2021 911 Turbo S Coupe and Cabriolet just two months ago, and now we’re getting a look at what’s in store for 911 Carrera, Carrera S, and Carrera 4S trims.

The latter two S trims will finally be getting a seven-speed manual gearbox, which by 2019 standards would mean these models will be dropping in price by $3,660, being that 2020 models made the new eight-speed dual-clutch automated PDK transmission standard, but European models will merely make the manual a no-cost option, so we’ll have to wait until Porsche Canada announces pricing in a few months to find out which direction they’ve chosen.

2021 Porsche 911 Carrera S Cabriolet
InnoDrive adaptive cruise control will be available for 2021.

Speaking of PDK-equipped 911s, Porsche will offer 2021 examples InnoDrive adaptive cruise control that, in addition to being able to follow the vehicle ahead without the driver needing to manually modulate speed, can also maintain set speed limits automatically and slow down autonomously when approaching corners.

A tire temperature readout gauge for the Sport Chrono Package is also new for 2021, as is Smartlift, an available front axle-lift feature that will raise the 911’s front end in order to clear large speed bumps and steep driveways. Better yet, Smartlift gets its intelligent name from having a memory feature capable of storing a location where the front end has been lifted and then remembering to do so again automatically next time you arrive.

2021 Porsche 911 Carrera
Want a quicker, better handling 911? Coupe models will be available with new lightweight window glass for 2021.

Additionally, just in case you weren’t quite sure whether Porsche was still a purist’s sports car brand and not just another luxury carmaker, you can now order your 2021 911 Carrera with a lightweight glass package that reduces mass up higher in the car and therefore lowers its centre of gravity to improve handling. This said you could choose thicker insulated glass instead, which has been designed to reduce interior noise for a more comfortable drive.

2021 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet
A new Smartlift system will automatically raise the front suspension to overcome steep driveways and large speed bumps.

A new retrospective leather upholstery upgrade package should also be popular for both Coupe and Cabriolet body styles, as it pulls styling cues from the now classic 930-era 911 Turbo. Porsche introduced it as standard equipment for the aforementioned 2021 Turbo S.

To make the ordering process easier to understand, Porsche renamed its seven-colour Light Design Package to the more self-explanatory Ambient Lighting Package, while Python Green has joined the Carrera’s exterior paint palette for 2021, this colour previously available for the 911 Turbo S and 718 Cayman GTS 4.0.

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

If you don’t know about the all-new eighth-generation 2020 Porsche 911 yet, where have you been hiding? It was introduced at the Los Angeles Auto Show back in November of 2018, while the Cabriolet arrived…

Porsche adds base Carrera Coupe and Cabriolet to 2020 911 lineup

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet
The new base 2020 911 Carrera Cabriolet looks much the same as the Carrera S that was shown in January, which is a very good thing. (Photo: Porsche)

If you don’t know about the all-new eighth-generation 2020 Porsche 911 yet, where have you been hiding? It was introduced at the Los Angeles Auto Show back in November of 2018, while the Cabriolet arrived at Detroit’s North American International Auto Show in January. Those two cars we first saw seven and nine months ago, however, were mid-range Carrera S models, so it was high time Porsche released images and info about its base Carrera Coupe and Cabriolet. 

The formidable S will soon arrive with 443 horsepower and 390 lb-ft of torque, resulting in 3.7 seconds from zero to 100km/h for the C2S and 3.6 seconds for the C4S, or 3.5 and 3.4 seconds respectively when the Sport Chrono Package is added, but take note that while the new base Carrera isn’t as intensely capable off the line it’s still a force to be reckoned with. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe
This 911 Carrera Coupe certainly doesn’t look like a “base” model. (Photo: Porsche)

The new 911 Carrera Coupe and Cabriolet share the same basic 3.0-litre horizontally opposed twin-turbocharged six-cylinder engine, but it features a different set of turbochargers for a more conservative yet still considerable 379 horsepower and 331 lb-ft of torque. Take note these new numbers add 9 horsepower over the outgoing 2019 model, resulting in standstill to 100km/h in just 4.2 seconds or 4.0 with its Sport Chrono Package, which is a big step up from the outgoing base Carrera that could only manage 4.6 or 4.2 seconds respectively. 

In an unusual move, at least for Porsche, the new 911 Carrera will initially only be available with the brand’s new eight-speed dual-clutch PDK gearbox, which is up one gear from the outgoing automatic. This upgraded transmission was originally announced with the Carrera S that also won’t see its seven-speed manual arrive until later in the model year. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet
The Cabriolet’s stop top is larger in order to cover a more accommodating interior. (Photo: Porsche)

The new 2020 Carrera Coupe maxes out at 293 km/h (182 mph), which is identical to the outgoing 2019 model and slightly below the new 2020 Carrera S Coupe that tops out at 306 and 308 km/h (190 and 191 mph) with and without the Chrono Sport Package respectively. The Cabriolet, on the other hand, will be capable of a 291-km/h (181-mph) top speed, its ability to nearly keep up with the hardtop version due to magnesium surface elements dubbed “bows” integrated within the redesigned fabric roof’s structure that prevent “ballooning” at high speeds. 

Incidentally, that soft top, which is now larger in order to snuggly fit over a more accommodating cabin, can open and close while driving at speeds of up to 50 km/h (30 mph), and takes just 12 seconds to fully perform this function due to revised hydraulics, a process that also powers an electrically extendable wind deflector to keep gusts of air from discomforting the driver and front passenger. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet
Get ready for a larger, roomier cabin with better technology and more luxury. (Photo: Porsche)

Below that well insulated top, the new 911 Carreras get a totally updated interior with a big 10.9-inch high-definition centre touchscreen, while new driving tech includes Porsche’s exclusive Wet Mode that allows for more control during inclement weather to improve safety. 

While all features just noted are standard with the Carrera S, the new base model will receive a smaller set of uniquely designed 19-inch alloy wheels on 235/40 ZR performance tires in front as well as a larger set of 20-inch alloy rims wearing 295/35 ZR rubber at the back. What’s more, the regular Carrera’s 330-millimetre brake discs are also smaller than the Carrera S rotors, these pressed down on via black-painted four-piston monobloc fixed calipers, whereas the base model’s exhaust system features special individual tailpipe covers. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet
Porsche’s dual-clutch PDK automated transmission, which moves up from 7 to 8 forward speeds, is standard off the mark. (Photo: Porsche)

So far Transport Canada hasn’t provided fuel economy figures for the upcoming 2020 911 models, but Porsche is claiming that its new base Coupe and Cabriolet will be good for 9.0 and 9.2 L/100km city/highway combined respectively on the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). 

Fortunately Porsche has announced Canadian prices, with a significant increase over the outgoing model’s $104,000 base price to $111,000, while the Cabriolet’s entry price has increased from $118,100 to $125,600. Porsche is no doubt banking on the two new models’ many improvements justifying those $7,000 and $7,500 price increases, one of which is the standard PDK automatic (prices may be reduced when a manual arrives), but it will be interesting to see how more value-driven competitors, such as the new 526-horsepower mid-engine C8 Corvette, which will start here in Canada at just $69,998, will eat into 911 sales. 

Nevertheless, the 2020 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe and Cabriolet can be ordered now and will be delivered early next year, while all-wheel drive versions will be available soon. While you’re waiting to get yours, make sure to enjoy the complete photo gallery above and the lone video below: 

The new 911 Carrera Coupé and 911 Carrera Cabriolet. (1:00):

Who could have known? Porsche 911 owners drive too fast. Even in the wet. With such knowledge at hand it only made sense for the German luxury brand to protect its most valuable assets, the thousands…

New Porsche 911 Wet mode improves control and safety over standing water

Porsche adds Wet mode to new 911
Porsche has added an exclusive “Wet mode” to its new 2020 911, said to improve control and safety over standing water. (Photo: Porsche)

Who could have known? Porsche 911 owners drive too fast. Even in the wet. With such knowledge at hand it only made sense for the German luxury brand to protect its most valuable assets, the thousands of dedicated customers that loyally come back time and time again to renew their pledge at the 911 altar. 

Along with the introduction of the completely redesigned 2020 911 at the Los Angeles auto show in November of last year, Porsche announced a new Wet Mode designed to assist would-be owners that get over their heads in standing water. 

As it turns out, the deep end that can cause a 911 or most any other sports car shod in ultra-wide 21-inch performance tires to lose grip can be merely a single millimetre (0.04 inches) in depth, and it doesn’t need to be raining either, so don’t think the optical sensors used for your car’s rain-sensing wipers can be reallocated to detect sheets of water covering the road. 

Porsche adds Wet mode to new 911
Wet mode activates special settings for the 911’s PSM and PTM systems, plus deploys the car’s active aero features. (Photo: Porsche)

Porsche’s new Wet Mode can detect standing water, however, via acoustic sensors positioned within the front wheel arches just behind the tires. Rather than see water on the road, Wet Mode sensors listen for water spray, and if decibel levels get too strong the 911’s multi-information display will suggest you turn on Wet mode via a button on the new “button bar” above the centre console, or if equipped with the available Sport Chrono Package, by twisting the steering wheel-mounted “DRIVE MODE” selector. 

Porsche adds Wet mode to new 911
To turn Wet mode on, simple press a button on the centre stack, or when equipped with the Sport Chrono Package, twist the “DRIVE MODE” dial on the steering wheel. (Photo: Porsche)

That would be the rotating dial and “Sport Response” button just below the steering wheel’s right-side spoke, which can also be used to select “Normal”, “Sport”, ‘Sport Plus’ and ‘Individual’ driving modes. For the 2020 911, and without doubt more Porsche models to come, it also includes the new Wet mode, allowing drivers to select a safer setting when traveling over water-soaked pavement that could cause aquaplaning, or hydroplaning. 

“Wet Mode was developed to provide the driver with consistent support in wet conditions,” said August Achleitner, a.k.a. “Mister 911” who headed up development of the new 911 and took part in its launch just before retiring. “It does not restrict the maximum power of the engine or limit the top speed, and should therefore also not be used as insurance for driving too fast in very wet conditions. Instead, it should be seen as an assistance system in the truest sense.” 

Porsche adds Wet mode to new 911
Along with Wet mode, this dial lets you select “Normal”, “Sport”, ‘Sport Plus’ and ‘Individual’ driving modes, plus it includes a performance enhancing “Sport Response” button. (Photo: Porsche)

Achleitner, who’s been with Porsche since 1983, earned his alternate title by being responsible for 911 model series development since 2001, and interestingly Wet mode was actually first developed back in the ‘90s. 

When put into play, Wet mode applies more sensitive preconditioned settings to all of the 911’s driver assistive systems, such as Porsche Stability Management (PSM), Porsche Traction Management (PTM), and the car’s active aerodynamics, before combining their collective capability toward wet weather management. Specifically, the active variable rear spoiler extends to its performance position at just 90 km/h (sooner than in dry conditions), adding downforce to the rear tires, while frontal cooling air flaps open to increase downward pressure over the front wheels. 

Porsche adds Wet mode to new 911
The yellow dot behind the front tire is an acoustic sensor that listens for water spray. (Photo: Porsche)

While the engine doesn’t relinquish any power, Wet mode delivers thrust more evenly in order to minimize engine torque buildup, with the end result being maximum traction at each wheel. What’s more, if piloting an all-wheel drive 4S model, additional torque gets transferred to the front axle for even more balanced distribution. 

Of course, both Sport mode and the PSM Off function can’t be activated in Wet mode, while the new eight-speed PDK transmission’s shift strategy and the electronically controlled rear differential’s locking ratios automatically adapt to a smoother, more linear power delivery too. 

Porsche claims “more confident handling” when using Wet mode in inclement conditions, and also states that Wet mode is ideal for snowy conditions as well. 

Porsche adds Wet mode to new 911
While hooping a new 911 looks like fun, Wet mode is actually designed for maximizing safety and control. (Photo: Porsche)

While driver assistive technology this effective would be welcome in any car, it’s especially important in a sports car as capable as the new 911 that, thanks to 443 horsepower and 390 lb-ft of torque behind the rear axle, can sprint from standstill to 100km/h in just 3.7 seconds in Carrera S guise, or 3.6 seconds when benefiting from the Carrera 4S model’s all-wheel drivetrain, or 3.5 and 3.4 seconds respectively with the Sport Chrono Package, before attaining top speeds of 308 and 306 km/h (190 and 191 mph) apiece. 

To learn more about the new 2020 911’s Wet mode watch the video below, and also remember to browse through our photo gallery above for some fabulous shots of water spraying behind the new 911 during wet weather testing. 

 

 

Learn how the Porsche Wet Mode works (1:43):

The 911 Cabriolet has been with us so long it seems as if it’s always been part of Porsche’s lineup, but it took almost 20 years of 911 production before the completely exposed model arrived in 1982.…

Porsche reveals new 2020 911 Cabriolet

2020 Porsche 911 Cabriolet
The all-new 2020 Porsche 911 Cabriolet has most of the same styling updates as the recently introduced 2020 911 Carrera coupe. (Photo: Porsche)

The 911 Cabriolet has been with us so long it seems as if it’s always been part of Porsche’s lineup, but it took almost 20 years of 911 production before the completely exposed model arrived in 1982. Ahead of this, going topless required the complete removal of a metal roof panel, the 911 Targa having arrived on the scene in 1966 with either a fixed glass or foldaway plastic rear window. 

Brief history lesson completed, Porsche introduced its all-new 2020 911 Cabriolet on Monday, January 8, with a promised arrival in the third quarter of this year and the ability to place your order now, the latter point being the same as with the new 911 coupe that was introduced last month and is slated to go on sale this summer. 

2020 Porsche 911 Cabriolet
Along with its squared off lower fascia, the new 911 brings back the classic double creased hood. (Photo: Porsche)

Also like the new coupe, the first new 2020 Cabriolets we’ll be able to get our hands on will be in rear-wheel drive Carrera S (C2S) and all-wheel drive Carrera 4S (C4S) guise, featuring a more formidable redesigned 3.0-litre turbocharged boxer engine that’s good for 443 horsepower and 390 lb-ft of torque, an increase of 23 horsepower and 22 lb-ft of torque respectively, and fitted with Porsche’s all-new eight-speed automated dual-clutch PDK gearbox. Once again, seven-speed manual variants will show up later, as will less potent Carrera and Carrera 4 models sporting a revised 385 horsepower 3.0-litre turbo six behind the rear axle, this engine 15 horsepower more capable. Likewise, Turbo versions will enter the fray later, although Porsche has yet to provide a time frame for these. 

2020 Porsche 911 Cabriolet
Now even RWD 911s get a body-wide centre taillight, a feature that was previously only available with AWD models. (Photo: Porsche)

Porsche has only provided performance specs for the C2S and C4S shown, with standstill to 100km/h achieved in just 3.9 and 3.8 seconds apiece, while those numbers improve to 3.7 and 3.6 seconds respectively when the Sport Chrono Package is added, the greater traction of the all-wheel drive model allowing for a slight advantage at takeoff. 

Amazingly, thanks to magnesium surface elements dubbed “bows” that are integrated within the redesigned fabric roof’s structure and prevent “ballooning” at high speeds, new 911 drop-top models are only 2 km/h slower than their hardtop siblings when factoring in terminal velocities, their top speeds set to 306 km/h (190 mph) for the C2S and 304 km/h (189 mph) for the C4S. 

2020 Porsche 911 Cabriolet
The new 911 Cabriolet provides an ultra-sleek profile. (Photo: Porsche)

Additionally, that soft top, which is now larger to fit over the more accommodating cabin, can open and close on the fly at speeds of up to 50 km/h (30 mph), and takes a scant 12 seconds to fully perform this function due to revised hydraulics, a process that also powers an electrically extendable wind deflector to keep gusts of air from discomforting the driver and front passenger. 

As you might expect, the 2020 911’s interior is much the same as the new coupe’s, highlighted by a new horizontal design theme inspired by early ‘60s through ‘90s models, but now the primary gauge cluster is mostly digital with twin LCD panels surrounding the usual mechanical centre tachometer, while above a completely reworked centre stack and console is a 10.9-inch Porsche Communication Management (PCM) infotainment touchscreen, literally a big improvement over its 7.0-inch predecessor. 

2020 Porsche 911 Cabriolet
Despite radical changes, for a 911, no one should mistake the new 2020 model for anything else. (Photo: Porsche)

Back in front of the driver, a new steering wheel incorporates an adaptation of the same rotating steering wheel-mounted driving mode selector found in the outgoing 911 Cabriolet, but now a standard Wet mode gets added to the mix, capable of maintaining better control over water-soaked road surfaces when activated. Safety in mind, the new 911 Cab will also get standard autonomous emergency braking with moving object detection, while a backup camera and rear parking sensors will also be standard. 

2020 Porsche 911 Cabriolet
As usual, the 911 Cabriolet’s top should fit as snuggly as any fabric top available, while it now retracts quicker than ever before. (Photo: Porsche)

Porsche promises increased comfort and support from its new available 18-way powered front seats, while other options include adaptive cruise control with stop and go, a 360-degree surround parking camera that should be extremely helpful on the new widescreen display, plus new Night Vision Assist that will provide visual assistance for steering clear of pedestrians or animals in the dark via a heat-sensing thermal imaging camera. 

On a more mechanical note, for the first time 911 Cabriolet customers will be able to choose the Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) adaptive sport suspension from the options list, which provides stiffer, shorter spring sets for a 10-mm lower ride height, and more rigid anti-roll bars, allowing improved weight distribution for a more neutral feel. 

2020 Porsche 911 Cabriolet
So what do you think? Does the new 911 Cabriolet’s styling improve on the previous generation? (Photo: Porsche)

As for style, the new 911 Cabriolet pulls over most of the coupe’s new design cues below the waistline, including an all-new rectangular lower front grille/fascia that creates a wider more planted appearance, a completely reshaped hood that squares off near the front and incorporates a classic tapering indentation at centre, wider front and rear fenders that flow over larger 20- and 21-inch front to rear staggered alloy wheels, new side mirrors and new flush door handles that pop out when touched, and a new body-wide LED taillight hovering over a 718-style 3D “PORSCHE” graphic bookended with totally unique corner lights, while its bulging rear deck lid panels are similar to the outgoing model yet redesigned for a smoother, more fluid result, the latter incorporating a new integrated dynamic spoiler that’s completely hidden when retracted yet much wider and more capable than the rear spoiler on the outgoing model when open. Likewise, no one should complain about the new larger fabric roof’s shape and fitment, as it’s once again beautifully contoured and ideally proportioned. 

2020 Porsche 911 Cabriolet
All the 2020 911 Carrera coupe’s improvements, sans the roof. (Photo: Porsche)

Also like the 2020 911 coupe, the redesigned Cabriolet makes greater use of lightweight aluminum both outside and within, its new front fenders eliminating steel from the body panel equation altogether, and its suspension now much more aluminum-intensive. 

The new 2020 Porsche Carrera S Cabriolet will arrive this fall for a base price of $143,700, along with the 2020 Carrera 4S Cabriolet that starts at $152,100. 

Remember to contact your local Porsche dealer if you want to put one on order, and after you’ve done that make sure to check out our photo gallery above and these two Porsche-supplied videos below: 

 

The new 911 Cabriolet: First Driving Footage (1:08):

 

The new Porsche 911 Cabriolet – All set for open-top season (1:09):

You’d need to go back a very long way to find a year that Porsche’s 911 wasn’t the best-selling premium branded sports car in Canada or the U.S., and 2018 won’t be any different once the final…

Porsche opens the order book for all-new 2020 911 Carrera S and 4S

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S
Porsche introduced the all-new 2020 Carrera S and Carrera 4S at an impressive gala in Los Angeles last month. (Photo: Porsche)

You’d need to go back a very long way to find a year that Porsche’s 911 wasn’t the best-selling premium branded sports car in Canada or the U.S., and 2018 won’t be any different once the final numbers are tallied and compared to its closest rivals. 

Year-to-date third-quarter Canadian-market results showed the 911 at 1,083 units and the next best-selling Audi TT at 366, while the more directly competitive Jaguar F-Type came in at just 347 deliveries. It’s really no contest, with some others that might be deemed rivals including the Audi R8 with 208 unit sales, the Mercedes-Benz AMG GT at 195 deliveries and SL at 140, and the Acura NSX with just 33. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S
New 911 C2S and C4S (shown) models promise serious performance gains over their already impressive predecessors. (Photo: Porsche)

With numbers like these it’s no wonder the majority of competitors don’t redesign their sports car models very often and aren’t offering many special editions either, but Porsche has enough market strength to do both. In fact, the 2019 911 currently available offers three totally unique roof systems, various front and rear fascia designs, differing fender widths, visual body style/performance upgrades such as rear-fender engine ducts, rear- and all-wheel drivetrains, manual and dual-clutch automated transmissions, a host of engine options from 370 to 700 horsepower, a wide assortment of trims for almost every premium-level budget, and options enough to boggle the mind. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S
Along with dramatically new styling, the new C2S and C4S feature wider fender flares and meatier rear tires. (Photo: Porsche)

If that weren’t enough, Porsche just introduced the all-new eighth-generation 2020 911, which will become available here this coming summer. They’ve only announced pricing for two models so far, the $129,100 911 Carrera S (C2S) and the $137,400 911 Carrera 4S (C4S), the first rear-wheel drive and the latter all-wheel drive, but more models are set to arrive later this year. 

From side profile the 2020 911 looks a lot like the car it’s replacing, but this has more or less been reality since the car went from an air-cooled rear-mounted flat-six to a water-cooled variant back in 1999. Porsche has always been more about year-over-year refinement than change for change’s sake, and therefore we have a 2020 model that mirrors the 2019 from some angles. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S
The rear-wheel drive 911 Carrera S (shown), or C2S, looks almost identical, and performs similarly to the all-wheel drive C4S. (Photo: Porsche)

This said the visual modifications are plentiful enough to cause consternation amongst traditionalists, or at least tempered pause. For starters, the hood and lower front fascia have departed from the car’s usual combination of mostly body-colour oval shapes to an almost straight, horizontal slit separating the former from the bodywork below, and a broad black rectangle for the latter, giving the entire car a wider, more aggressive albeit not necessarily as elegant stance, similar in concept to the frontal change made to the once technologically-tied, and in recent decades more purposely retrospective VW Beetle (A5), when it lost its “New” moniker in 2011, not that I’m trying to compare either car directly. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S
Unlike previous 911s, new RWD models receive a body-width light bar in back, this feature only available with AWD models before. (Photo: Porsche)

As for design cues pulled up from the internally-codenamed 991 series (2012–2019) seventh-generation model to this 992 series car, the just noted squared-off hood now includes classically tapered creases at each side of its indented centre, just like the original 911 albeit without a vented end, while Porsche intelligently left the outer design of its ovoid multi-element four-point LED headlamp clusters unmolested, a lesson learned when the aforementioned 1999 996’s Boxster-inspired L-shaped lamps ventured too far from 911 orthodoxy. 

As noted, the two cars look nearly identical from side profile excepting the previously noted front and rear fascia vents and surrounding bodywork, plus slightly more upright headlamps, reverse front side marker lights, more chiseled wheel cutouts, new mirror caps, new sharply angled flush-mounted door handles that extend outward when touched replacing the old model’s more classic rounded pulls, a much smoother rear deck lid, and taillights that now wrap around the bodyside more fully. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S
The new 911’s extra width allows for better mechanical grip around corners, while the larger dynamic rear spoiler (shown extended) can improve downforce to zero lift. (Photo: Porsche)

When seen from behind those taillights come into clearer view, with the new model building on the 991’s narrow dagger-like LED-infused lenses and even slimmer body-wide light strip (previously only found on all-wheel drive models) by extending the latter further outward to each side, and then at centre grafting in some 718-sourced 3D-like graphics above seemingly open vent slats underneath, while chiseling out even more linear lines for the outer lamps. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera
The redesigned 911 features new aluminum front fenders and greater use of the lightweight alloy in the chassis. (Photo: Porsche)

The diffuser-infused lower bumper is bigger, bolder and blacker than before too, plus it feeds faux exhaust tips from within rather than appearing like they’re forced to exit below (which actually remains the case), while hidden within the new 911’s gently flowing rear deck lid, just above the aforementioned light strip and below a row of glossy black engine vent strakes, is a much wider and larger active spoiler featuring multiple positions for varying levels of rear downforce. 

Of course, there will be many variations on the new 911 theme, some including a fixed rear spoiler for an even more expressive and capable trailing edge, plus various fascia designs nose to tail, but all body panels are now made from lightweight aluminum, bumpers excluded. In reality only the front fenders were lightened, being that most of the 991’s skin was already alloy, the change saving between 10 and 15 kilos (22 and 33 lbs) depending on the model, but take note the underlying body structure halves steel content from 63 to 30 percent, with the remaining 70 percent now fully constructed from aluminum, all of which will help to improve structural rigidity, handling, fuel efficiency, and more. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera
The new 911 gets a fully redesigned interior featuring a mostly digital instrument cluster, a larger 10.9-inch centre display, and more. (Photo: Porsche)

As noted earlier, the first models to be introduced are the Carrera S and 4S shown on this page. Compared to the previous generation this all-new model is not only visually wider due to styling, but actually grows by 45 mm (1.8 inches) at the front wheels. What’s more, its rear flanks have widened by 44 mm (1.7 in) to 1,852 mm (72.9 in), this being identical in width to the outgoing GTS model. New 20-inch front and 21-inch rear wheels come standard with S-enhanced Carreras, the former on 245/35 ZR-rated rubber and the latter on a mighty set of 305/30 ZRs—base 911s will get a staggered set of 19s and 20s. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera
Only the centre dial is analogue, the tachometer surrounded by dual LCD displays that provide multiple usage. (Photo: Porsche)

Despite all the extra aluminum used in the new body and chassis, both new C2S and C4S models add 55 kilos (121 lbs) of unladen weight, according to the Porsche Canada retail site, with the outgoing 2019 Carrera S hitting the scales at 1,460 kilograms (3,219 lbs) compared to the 2020 model’s 1,515 kg (3,340 lbs), and the old Carrera 4S weighing in at 1,510 kg (3,329 lbs) compared to 1,565 kg (3,450 lbs) for the redesigned car. 

At first glance that extra weight shouldn’t have much if anything to do with the powertrain, because the new car’s horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine once again displaces 3.0 litres. It’s heavily reworked, mind you, with somewhat weightier cast-iron headers replacing the old mill’s stamped steel manifolds resulting in freer flowing exhaust, plus an entirely new and pricier piezo injection system for more precise fuel delivery, a fresh set of turbochargers pulled from the outgoing GTS powerplant, and a single new intercooler that’s now housed centrally on the 992’s backside instead of the two previously hidden within the 991’s rear fenders. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera
The new cabin is larger and therefore roomier than the previous model. (Photo: Porsche)

The improvements allow for a higher 10.5:1 compression ratio, up from 10.0:1, which combine for a 23-horsepower and 22-lb-ft advantage over the outgoing C2S and C4S, with thrust now rated at 443 horsepower and twist at 390 lb-ft of torque, resulting in 3.7 seconds from standstill to 100km/h for the former and 3.6 seconds for the latter, or 3.5 and 3.4 seconds respectively with the Sport Chrono Package added, while top speeds are set to 308 and 306 km/h (190 and 191 mph) apiece. Incidentally, the base engine, which keeps the same turbos as last year’s car, increases output by 15 horsepower to 385. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera
The large widescreen display will be a key reason for many to upgrade from old 911 to new. (Photo: Porsche)

You may have noticed there were no differing times between manual and automatic transmissions, this because 2020 C2S and C4S trims will initially come standard with Porsche’s new eight-speed PDK dual-clutch automated transmission, up one gear from the outgoing automatic, with a mostly unchanged seven-speed manual gearbox expected later in the year. 

The new eight-speed PDK was first introduced in the recently updated Panamera, and despite initially being housed in such a large model, was chosen for the 911 due to space improvements. The gearbox doubles its shafts for a shorter, more compact design, even leaving room for a future electric motor when fitted to a similarly sized housing. This means we should expect a plug-in hybrid version of the 911 sometime in the not-too-distant future, and if the just noted Panamera is anything to go by, it’ll one day be the most potent form of 911 available. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera
The tiny shift lever is a clear sign that manually shifting the new eight-speed dual-clutch PDK must be done via paddles. (Photo: Porsche)

As always, the updated PDK comes with standard steering wheel-mounted paddle shifters, but this time they’re an absolute must because Porsche has replaced the old model’s conventional shift lever with a tiny little electronically actuated nub, saving enough centre console space for a cupholder while modernizing the interior design. Most won’t complain, even old-schoolers wanting to adjust the audio system’s volume and swap stations/tracks via rotating knobs, which can both still be found on the same lower console. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera
A limousine it’s not, but this cutaway shows that rear seat roominess has improved. (Photo: Porsche)

All adjustments are now displayed on a 3.9-inch larger 10.9-inch infotainment touchscreen that also gets better resolution quality and greater depth of colour than its predecessor, plus updated graphics, improved performance, more functions from fewer physical buttons, and most everything else already included with more recently redesigned Porsche models. This said the instrument panel housing all of the above pays much respect to 911s of the ‘60s, ‘70s, ‘80s, and yes even the ‘90s, all of which were only slight adaptations of the same horizontal theme until the aforementioned 996 arrived in 1999. The new IP even incorporates a narrow shelf that mimics the lower edge of the classic dashboard, this one potentially more functional, if attaching car-sized Pokemon or Hello Kitty action figures—sigh, I’ve seen these in Ferraris, Lamborghinis and McLarens too. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera
The 911 will never deviate from its horizontally opposed “boxer” layout, but it will continue to tweak it with every generation. (Photo: Porsche)

Even the comparatively radical 996 didn’t stray too far from the sacrosanct original when it came to organizing its primary gauge cluster, but this time around Porsche went so far as to visually separate each dial like the earlier cars, instead of letting their circular edges bleed into each other. Nevertheless, there’s only one mechanical gauge at centre, the tachometer as always, with the four surrounding dials held in place via virtual reality thanks to large TFT/LCD displays that are also capable of showing route guidance, audio, trip, and cruise information, plus more. Specifically, the right side incorporates the multi-information display as with the 991, whereas the left portion shows a conventional looking speedometer in default mode or the various new advanced driver assistance systems including adaptive cruise control, blindspot warning, lane keeping assist, etcetera. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera
Those fortunate enough to drive the new 911 will experienced a thoroughly redeveloped suspension. (Photo: Porsche)

Being that the 2020 CS and C4S are not yet available we aren’t able to build them in Porsche’s online configurator, but we already know that 18-way adaptive sports seats will be optional, as will a 360-degree surround parking camera that should look fabulous on the new widescreen display, plus new Night Vision Assist that will provide visual assistance for steering clear of pedestrians or animals in the dark via a heat-sensing thermal imaging camera. 

We’ve also been told that C2S and C4S brake-rotor sizes and calipers continue forward unchanged from the outgoing models, but new Porsche Surface Coated Brakes (PSCB), which were introduced last year on the new Cayenne, will now be available with the 2020 911. PSCB adds a hardened tungsten-carbide layer to friction surfaces to enhance stopping performance, while they’re said to last longer than conventional cast iron brakes and reduce dust. The calipers will boast bright white paint to separate them from those used for the standard braking system. 

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera
Porsche has made some of the 911’s strongest performance gains in braking, with Porsche Surface Coated Brakes (PSCB) now available. (Photo: Porsche)

Speaking of standard, a new Wet mode detects as little as one millimetre (0.04 inches) of standing water on the road before alerting the driver, who then has the option of adjusting to a more sensitive stability control setting that’s been added to a new version of the same rotating steering wheel-mounted driving mode selector found in the 991. The new 911 will also get standard autonomous emergency braking with moving object detection. 

So when can you get the new 2020 Porsche 911 of your choice? As noted the Carrera S and Carrera 4S coupes with the automated PDK gearbox will be first to arrive this summer, after initially launching in Europe. Shortly thereafter we’ll receive Cabriolet versions of the same C2S and C4S models, while later this year we’ll get the base Carrera and Carrera 4 with both manual and PDK transmissions, the former of which should also become available with S models. We can expect the new 992 Turbo to show up at the end of the year, with other models arriving in 2020. Porsche retailers are now placing orders for the Carrera S and 4S.

While you’re waiting to take one for a drive in person, make sure to check out our comprehensive photo gallery above and all of the videos we’ve provided below, the first of which is the 42-minute premiere program that covers every historical 911 era:

 

The new Porsche 911 world premiere. LIVE from L.A. (42:00):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eMq2JrpId8c

 

The new Porsche 911. Timeless machine. (1:24):

 

The new Porsche 911: Highlight Video. (2:35):

 

The new Porsche 911: Exterior & Interior Design. (1:09):

 

The new Porsche 911: First Driving Footage. (0:59):

Porsche is now a septuagenarian, with Ferry Porsche, the well-schooled son of the already acclaimed engineer, peoples’ car creator and past Volkswagen Chairman Ferdinand Porsche, having put the brand’s…

Porsche 911 Speedster Concept combines open-top fun with 500 horsepower

2018 Porsche 911 Speedster Concept
Porsche decided to celebrate its 70th anniversary with this gorgeous 911 Speedster Concept. Will it see production? (Photo: Porsche)

Porsche is now a septuagenarian, with Ferry Porsche, the well-schooled son of the already acclaimed engineer, peoples’ car creator and past Volkswagen Chairman Ferdinand Porsche, having put the brand’s first car on the road in 1948. 

It all started with the original Porsche 356 ‘No. 1’ Roadster, which received its operating permit 70 years ago on June 8. Speed ahead seven decades and we now have the stunning 911 Speedster Concept that was created to commemorate the momentous occasion. 

2018 Porsche 911 Speedster Concept
The “double bubble” engine cover pays homage to 911 Speedster models from Porsche’s past. (Photo: Porsche)

The 356 was highly advanced for its time, yet by today’s standards it’s as pure as sports cars get. The 911 Speedster Concept is a modern interpretation of that same undefiled spirit, created to provide a purely visceral driving experience, even eschewing a convertible top for a lightweight tonneau cover. 

Unveiled at the ‘70 years Porsche sportscar’ anniversary celebrations in Zuffenhausen, Germany, the 911 Speedster Concept’s sheet metal wears a classic two-tone racing livery design that was often multi-coloured yet looked handsome in white on traditional German silver. 

2018 Porsche 911 Speedster Concept
Do a search for “356 racing cars” and you’ll find many colourful examples of the 911 Speedster’s unique two-tone paint scheme. (Photo: Porsche)

The paintwork and everything else came care of the Porsche Motorsport Centre, which is more notably responsible for the 911 GT2 RS, and more recently the GT3 RS. Good company for this 911 Speedster Concept to be rubbing shoulders with, and wouldn’t it be wonderful if Porsche decided to give us a series-production version of this new roadster. 

Porsche says the “decision on whether to move ahead will be made in the coming months,” with any result of such choice not materializing until 2019. No doubt it’ll be worth the wait. 

2018 Porsche 911 Speedster Concept
Check out a larger version of this photo in the gallery, where it’s easier to see the “X” etched into the headlamp glass. (Photo: Porsche)

Like production 911 Speedsters that came before, the first modern interpretation arriving in 1988 and the most recent example based on the 997 from 2010, the 2018 version gets a set of abbreviated A-pillars set on more of a rearward incline than the current production model, resulting in a shorter more sweptback windscreen frame. The side windows are correspondingly shorter as well, the combination giving the Speedster a “stockier profile with a very low fly line,” says Porsche. 

Of course, this is not only reminiscent of both 1988 and 2010 911 Speedster homage models, but more so the original 356 1500 Speedster. That model actually came along in late 1954, after U.S. importer Max Hoffman advised the powers that be in Stuttgart that a lower-cost, decontented open-top model could become a sales success in the American market. 

2018 Porsche 911 Speedster Concept
The 911 Speedster Concept shows off a classic racing style gas cap on top of its hood. (Photo: Porsche)

While that original 1955 model had a fabric tonneau cover snapped onto its back, the new 2018 version receives a special one-off carbon fibre ‘double bubble’ cover in similitude of the 1988 and 2010 cars’ designs. The new version covers the area behind the front row where the rear jump seats normally reside, and also masks the rollover protection structure that was never part of the 1988 or 1955 model, while a glossy black backing wraps overtop the front portion of the cover to create a shortened Targa-like look. Just behind, the set of contrasting black slats straddling the buttresses are in fact aerodynamic elements, while a Plexiglas wind deflector is set in the middle, highlighted by an engraved ‘70 years of Porsche’ plaque. 

2018 Porsche 911 Speedster Concept
We love the 911 Speedster’s Talbot-style side mirrors. (Photo: Porsche)

Just in case a downpour threatens to ruin the prototype’s beautiful cognac coloured Aniline leather hides, the Porsche Motorsport Centre team has provided a lightweight tonneau cover that, when attached via eight Tenax fasteners, can protect the 911 Speedster Concept’s cabin from inclement weather, but only when parked. When on the road you’d better keep moving. 

The interior in mind, Porsche has kept the true spirit of the 911 Speedster intact by removing weighty features like the navigation, radio and air conditioning systems. Even the steering wheel is purely minimalist thanks to the elimination of ancillary switchgear, while the full bucket sport seats are framed in lightweight carbon. 

2018 Porsche 911 Speedster Concept
From the classic “Speedster” nameplate lettering to the Targa-style buttresses, the 911 Speedster will become a future collectible if it gets the nod for production. (Photo: Porsche)

If you’re wondering what the Porsche Motorsport Centre used for a donor car, look no further than the brand’s 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet, although the concept’s hood, rear cover and aerodynamic components are made from carbon fibre reinforced composite. 

Some stylistic links to Porsche’s motorsport past include headlamp lenses imprinted with “X” markings to denote tape that was often used to preemptively prevent broken glass from littering the racetrack and puncturing tires, while the 911 Speedster Concept also features a 1950s-style gas cap placed in the middle of the hood for quick refueling directly above the tank. Additionally, the side mirrors pay homage to the classic Talbot design that was popular when the 356 was created, while the milled, gold-plated “Speedster” lettering on the thick B-pillars and rear engine cover direct their tribute to the original ‘50s-era 356 Speedster. 

2018 Porsche 911 Speedster Concept
Porsche has gone minimalist inside, removing heavy luxuries in order to save weight. (Photo: Porsche)

Of course, everything is cutting-edge modern under the 911 Speedster Concept’s retrospective skin, its chassis actually pulled from the new 911 GT3, while the low-slung drop-top rides on a set of 21-inch Fuchs alloys featuring “contrasting high gloss polished clover-leaf details,” says Porsche, plus centre locks. 

The flat six hidden under the handcrafted rear bodywork spins to 9,000 rpm on its way to making 500 horsepower, while a set of custom titanium tailpipes are put in charge of freeing exhaust gases. And as would only be appropriate, the Porsche Motorsport Centre team made sure a six-speed manual transmission took care of shifting duties. 

We’ll soon know if Porsche plans to remove the word “Concept” from the 911 Speedster’s moniker, and thereby provide its legions of sports car fans with a modern-day production version of the storied nameplate. Until then we’ll just have to cross our collective fingers and hope for the best.

No sports car brand is more respected than Porsche, and no model in the entire industry more revered than the mighty 911. It’s been in constant production for more than 50 years, having celebrated quinquagenarian…

Porsche celebrates one-millionth 911 milestone

2017 Porsche 911 Carrera S
Dr. Wolfgang Porsche poses with the one-millionth 911, a special Carrera S that will soon begin a world tour. (Photo: Porsche)

No sports car brand is more respected than Porsche, and no model in the entire industry more revered than the mighty 911. It’s been in constant production for more than 50 years, having celebrated quinquagenarian status in 2013. Now just four years later it has achieved yet another milestone, the production of its one-millionth car.

On May 11, 2017, Porsche rolled a special Irish Green coloured 911 Carrera S Coupe off of its Zuffenhausen plant assembly line as part of its million-unit celebration, the car featuring exclusive details in homage of the 1963 original.

While no longer the bestselling vehicle in the German brand’s lineup, the 911 remains its most popular car as well as its most important model due to its heritage and performance credentials. The 911 is “key in helping Porsche maintain its position as one of the most prestigious car manufacturers in the world,” said Porsche in an associated press release.

2017 Porsche 911 Carrera S
This unique 911 Carrera S Coupe boasts Irish Green paint, gold emblems and 20-inch alloys. (Photo: Porsche)

Unlike the 911’s competitors, many of which have come and gone since 1963, the 911 is a car that can be driven comfortably and reliably each and every day, no matter the weather conditions, quality of road surface, traffic congestion, or any other external circumstance, yet despite its daily ease of use it can be taken to the track on the weekend and put through its paces without any modification.

In fact, more 911s have won races than any other roadworthy sports car, by professionals and amateurs alike. What’s more, Porsche credits the 911 with more than half of its own race wins, which says a lot when considering the many formidable models the brand has contested over the past five and a half decades, many of which were designed purely for motorsport.

2017 Porsche 911 Carrera S
Porsche should consider offering a “Classic” model like VW does with its Beetle, as the gold emblems are beautiful. (Photo: Porsche)

Performance in mind, Porsche has never deviated from the original 911 concept, although according to Oliver Blume, Chairman of the Executive Board of Porsche AG, “…. we have continued to enhance the technology of the 911, refining and perfecting the sports car. That’s why it remains a state-of-the-art and technically innovative vehicle. We have also been able to expand the model line very successfully through derivatives.”

Today, Canadian sports car enthusiasts can purchase a 911 in three separate body styles and no less than 22 unique variants, the former including the Coupe, Cabriolet and Targa, while the latter is replete with names like Carrera, Carrera 4, S, GTS, Turbo, Turbo S, Exclusive Series, GT3, GT2 RS, and various permutations of each.

2017 Porsche 911 Carrera S
Only one Porsche will ever wear this “911 Nr. 1000000” plaque. (Photo: Porsche)

One of the reasons Porsche is able to build so many different 911s is its advanced production facility in Zuffenhausen, which has been the home of 911 assembly since day one. Now the storied factory incorporates all two-door Porsche models, including the 718 Cayman and 718 Boxster, which are all built on the same line “thanks to a sophisticated production approach” that includes workers who “are experts in up to 200 different tasks,” says Porsche.

“I cannot imagine the success story of the 911 without our unique Porsche employees,” said Uwe Hück, Chair of the Group Works Council of Porsche. “Today, we have the one-millionth 911. The good thing about it is that our colleagues still make them with the same devotion as the first car. The construction of the Mission E at the Zuffenhausen site is ringing in a new era at Porsche. And it is clear that if we are to make it a success, we will need our highly qualified and motivated employees. They will make sure that the Mission E is an emotional experience just like our 911 has always been – and always will be.”

2017 Porsche 911 Carrera S
Porsche’s Zuffenhausen plant has been home to the 911 since day one. (Photo: Porsche)

On hand for the one-millionth line-off celebration was Dr. Wolfgang Porsche, Chairman of the Supervisory Board of Porsche AG, who has been a part of the development of the 911 since job one (or rather job 901).

“54 years ago, I was able to take my first trips over the Grossglockner High Alpine Road with my father,” said Dr. Porsche. “The feeling of being in a 911 is just as enjoyable now as it was then. That’s because the 911 has ensured that the core values of our brand are as visionary today as they were in the first Porsche 356/1 from 1948.”

To call Porsche’s 911 a success would be an understatement of major proportion, and the car’s popularity is hardly slowing down. Last year Porsche delivered 32,365 911s worldwide, which resulted in the model’s best annual sales tally ever. Still, while it enjoys strong sales for a premium sports car, the 911 remains relatively exclusive and therefore holds its value very well. In fact, many 911 models have become coveted collector’s cars, with values that have escalated far higher than their original list prices.

1964 Porsche 911
The original 911 is a sought after collectible worth many times more now than it was 54 years ago. (Photo: Porsche)

Also impressive, over 70 percent of all Porsche cars ever produced are still on the road. One of the key reasons for their longevity is dependable operation, Porsche consistently found on top of third-party quality rankings, including J.D. Power’s Initial Quality and Vehicle Dependability studies.

If you were thinking of purchasing the one-millionth 911, consider one-million-and-one as this milestone car won’t be up for sale. You may be able to see it in person, however, as Porsche will soon be sending it on a world tour of road trips to include the Scottish Highlands, Germany’s famed Nürburgring, the U.S., China, and beyond.

Alternatively you can visit your local Porsche retailer and order a 2017 911 Carrera S in custom Irish Green with gold painted “PORSCHE” and “911” emblems, satin-silver mirror caps, 20-inch Carrera Sport alloy wheels, circular tailpipes, a leather interior with Sport-Tex seat centres in black and dark silver, a special plaque with your car’s build number, etcetera. No matter how you decide to have it built, a car collection is not complete without a Porsche 911.