The Fit is the least expensive way to put a Honda car in your garage, but it just might be the smartest choice no matter how much you’d be willing to spend. Ok, the same Japanese brand’s HR-V subcompact…

2019 Honda Fit LX CVT Road Test

2019 Honda Fit LX CVT
Even the more basic Fit trims, like this LX model, look sportier since its 2018 refresh. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The Fit is the least expensive way to put a Honda car in your garage, but it just might be the smartest choice no matter how much you’d be willing to spend.

Ok, the same Japanese brand’s HR-V subcompact crossover SUV incorporates the same ultimately innovative rear seating system, illusively dubbed Magic Seat, with even more cargo room, so either model might do the trick, but being that this Fit starts at just $15,590 compared to the HR-V’s $23,300 price tag, it’s the perfect choice for active lifestyle folks on more of a budget.

2019 Honda Fit LX CVT
The Fit’s wedge-like shape adds excitement to the design, while its tall profile makes it ultra-roomy inside. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

To be clear, my 2019 Fit tester was in second-rung LX trim, upgraded yet further with its optional continuously variable transmission (CVT), to its asking price moved up from $18,990 for the six-speed manual to $20,290, but the LX CVT with Honda Sensing not only provides the LX trim’s body-colour rear roofline spoiler, an auto-up/down driver’s window, illuminated steering wheel-mounted audio and cruise controls, larger infotainment touchscreen incorporating Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration, multi-angle rearview camera with dynamic guidelines, Siri Eyes Free compatibility, text message function, Wi-Fi tethering, extra USB device connector (for a total of two), filtered air conditioning, heatable front seats, centre console with armrest and storage bin, HondaLink Assist automatic emergency response system, cargo cover and more, but also includes forward collision warning with automatic emergency braking, lane departure warning, lane keeping assist, road departure mitigation, an ECON mode button, and the list goes on.

2019 Honda Fit LX CVT
Base DX and LX trims’ steel wheels with covers aren’t as dressy as the Sport and EX models. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The LX gets everything from the base model too, a shortlist including auto-off multi-reflector halogen headlamps, LED brake lights, heated power-adjustable side mirrors in body-coloured housings, body-colour door handles, remote entry, powered locks and windows, intermittent front and rear wipers, a tilt and telescopic steering column, 160-watt four-speaker AM/FM/MP3/WMA audio, Bluetooth phone connectivity with streaming audio, etcetera.

2019 Honda Fit LX CVT
Its tall taillights are uniquely shaped, and LED brake lamps respond faster than incandescent bulbs. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The Fit has always been a bit polarizing visually, but what subcompact hatchback is a style leader? Maybe Kia’s Rio could be called good looking, but most entry-level buyers likely agree this third generation Fit is a lot more eye-catching than the bland original and slightly less bland second generation, or at least it was for me, while the most recent 2018 refresh that adds yet more of Honda’s edgy new design language makes it look even better.

This upgrade came with an even edgier new Sport trim that I covered last year, this model’s $19,990 price placed right in the middle of four additional trims including base DX, my tester’s LX designation, $22,290 EX, and the $24,390 top-line EX-L NAVI. If you ask me, as much as I like the glossy black alloys and additional black and red exterior trim of the Sport, plus the performance-oriented black and red interior upgrades, the LX is probably the smartest option from a purely pragmatic point of view.

2019 Honda Fit LX CVT
Most body types will fit comfortably within the Fit. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

It’s an “everything you need, nothing you don’t” argument as verified by the features list above, the only upgrade I’d like being proximity-sensing access and pushbutton ignition, while once inside any Fit, old or new, or better yet having lived with one for enough time to experience how brilliantly practical it is, you’ll appreciate that styling matters a lot less than choosing the right car to accomplish the things you want to do. It’s the pragmatic minivan argument shrunken down to genuinely small proportions, yet play around awhile with its Magic Seat configurations and you’ll quickly understand that size really doesn’t matter when innovative engineering is factored in.

2019 Honda Fit LX CVT
All of the Fit’s controls are well laid out and driving position excellent. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

It’s long been one of the roomiest cars in its class, and the most versatile by far. People thinking they need to go full-size for more headroom had best expand their vision, as most will be cranking the Fit’s height-adjustable driver’s seat upward in order to take advantage of all the space overhead, thus providing a near SUV-like downward view at adjacent traffic below. The same can be said for legroom, which is more plentiful than most four-door sedans, while the Fit’s cargo space superiority certainly lives up to its name.

2019 Honda Fit LX CVT
The Fit’s primary gauge package is mostly digital. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

For those not familiar with the Fit’s rear Magic Seats, at first glance they seem to provide the same 60/40 split-folding second row as every competitor, not even including a centre pass-through, or my favourite 40/20/40 rear seat divide, but upon closer inspection it’s easy to see those rear seats sitting upon folding metal legs that allow the lower cushions to be lifted up against the seatbacks like those in the rear compartments of some pickup trucks. This provides a large 139-litre (4.9 cubic-foot) area for loading in tall cargo, like potted plants or bicycles (with front wheels removed), while still leaving all 470 litres (16.6 cubic feet) of available cargo space behind the second row. Drop those cushions back in place before pushing the rear seats into the floor exposes 1,492 litres (52.7 cubic feet) of maximum gear-toting capacity. That’s a lot for this class, and even the larger compact class. Yes, even Honda’s own Civic Hatchback is short some 184 litres (6.5 cubic feet) of maximum cargo volume when compared to the Fit.

2019 Honda Fit LX CVT
Great spot for a cupholder, right? (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

It’s good for people too, the Fit’s front seats providing wonderful comfort with excellent support, firm but not overly so. The steering column’s reach is ample for the majority of body types, making for an ideal driving position. Likewise, the rear outboard positions offer good comfort, having left my five-foot-eight long-legged, short-torso frame about five inches ahead of my knees and more than enough room to stretch out my legs when the driver’s seat was positioned for my height, plus about three and a half inches above my head and four or so next to my shoulders and hips.

2019 Honda Fit LX CVT
The infotainment system and HVAC interface work well. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Parked in that driver’s seat, a mostly digital gauge cluster gets a large three-dimensional speedometer at centre, this being the only analogue component, that’s surrounded by brilliant blues, greens and reds on a deeply contrasted black background, these highlighting various functions of the multi-information display mounted within the just-noted speedometer. The steering wheel switchgear that controls it, and other features, are excellent, and there are plenty of them.

Move over to the centre stack you’ll find one of the best infotainment displays in the segment, filled with smartly organized digital buttons leading to simply laid out function interfaces, with the audio panel augmented by a throwback analogue power/volume knob that I appreciated for its easy adjustment while driving. Just below is a compact manual HVAC panel nicely detailed with large dials featuring knurled metal-like grips.

2019 Honda Fit LX CVT
The front seats are very comfortable. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

As you might expect in this needs-driven class, the upper dash top is made from harder plastic, but Honda goes a step further than most subcompact rivals by finishing off the instrument panel ahead of the front passenger in a nicely sculpted soft-touch synthetic, while over on the other side is a handy feature not offered by any challenger, a pop-out cupholder just to the left of the steering wheel, where it’s easier to reach. It’s positioned directly in front of the corner vent, so will either heat up or cool down your drink depending whether you have the heat or air conditioning on. This can be a pleasant bonus, but take note it can also warm up a bottle of water.

2019 Honda Fit LX CVT
The rear seating area is spacious. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Believe it or not, the aforementioned Sport model and two trims above actually get a set of paddle shifters attached to the steering wheel next to that cupholder, which says a lot about this car’s drivability. Ahead of the firewall is a 1.5-litre four-cylinder engine that puts out a surprisingly strong 130 horsepower and 114 lb-ft of torque, or 128 and 113 respectively when hooked up to its optional CVT. Those numbers lift it into rare territory for this class, with only one base competitor making more. This provides a bit of fun off the line, more so for the manual, yet still plenty of straight-line speed for the CVT as well, plus decent highway passing performance and enough on tap to power out of corners when tackling the twisties.

2019 Honda Fit LX CVT
The rear Magic Seats can be folded up against the backrest to create storage space on the floor. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

And yes, despite its front strut and rear torsion beam suspension, the latter allowing for all that cargo space mentioned before, it carves a fairly quick corner, only becoming unsettled when pushed too hard through winding, bumpy pavement. This said the Fit was really designed more for urban commuting than blasts down rural mountainside two-laners, its ride set up for comfort first and foremost, and therefore providing good compliance over rough patches of inner-city tarmac.

Commuting in mind, the Fit’s claimed 8.1 L/100km city, 6.6 highway and 7.4 combined rating for the manual is very good, although the CVT is even easier on the wallet at only 7.0 city, 5.9 highway and 6.5 combined. Some rivals offer slightly better efficiency, but not together with the Fit’s performance, especially when comparing automatic transmissions.

2019 Honda Fit LX CVT
The Fit provides an incredible amount of total cargo space. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Summing up, the Fit is one of the better subcompacts to drive while providing superb fuel economy and unparalleled practicality, all together with good comfort, plenty of leading convenience features and safety technologies, plus Honda’s good name to keep it reliable and prop up its resale value. The Fit gets a pretty dramatic facelift for 2020, so make sure to visit CarCostCanada for all the latest rebate info on 2019s, as Honda retailers will be motivated to discount them. Also, before you try to negotiate, find out about the dealer invoice price so you know exactly what the retailer is paying in order to get the best deal possible. CarCostCanada is currently showing up to $1,000 off in additional incentives, so make sure you check out all the details before visiting your local retailer, and also learn about the 2019 Fit’s additional trims, packages and individual options.

Honda’s Fit has always been a personal favourite in the subcompact class. Its hatchback design is practical, made more so by a tall roofline combined with the segment’s most flexible rear seating…

2018 Honda Fit Sport Road Test

2018 Honda Fit Sport
All Honda Fit trims get styling updates for 2018, while this new Sport trim provides unique aero body panels, black alloys and interior upgrades. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Honda’s Fit has always been a personal favourite in the subcompact class. Its hatchback design is practical, made more so by a tall roofline combined with the segment’s most flexible rear seating system, resulting in more cargo space than any rival, plus now that it’s received a refresh it’s more appealing than ever. 

The 2018 Honda Fit facelift provides edgier styling, a new Sport trim line, and the availability of Honda Sensing advanced driver-assistance systems, the first factor improving the little wedge-shaped monobox design with a fresh take on the Japanese brand’s upswept horizontal grille that features more pronounced chrome and piano black slats plus a larger, more prominent “H” mark at centre. Additionally, new premium-like jeweled headlamp clusters meld more fluidly into that grille, while Honda has added a full-width splitter just below, as well as more angular corner “ducts” that get filled with sporty circular fog lamps in all trims above LX. 

2018 Honda Fit Sport
New LED-enhanced taillights and revised rear bumpers update the 2018 Fit, while this Sport model gets a rear diffuser and orange pin-striping added to its rear fascia. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

New combination taillights with LED brake lamps update the rear design, as does a reworked bumper, the latter feature now incorporating a full-width piano black character line as well as a splitter-inspired lower apron. Lastly, new Orange Fury paint is kept exclusively for an entirely new Sport trim level. 

On that note, the 2018 Honda Fit is available in the same DX, LX, EX and EX-L Navi trims as last year’s version, now priced at $15,190, $18,590, 21,890 and $23,990 respectively, but new Sport trim starts at $19,590 and therefore slots between the LX and EX. 

2018 Honda Fit Sport
Here’s a closer look at that new grille and headlight cluster. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

I don’t know about you, but the Fit Sport takes top spot as far as styling goes, as its standard aero kit adds muscle to the refreshed front, side and rear body panels resulting in a more aggressive look, plus bright orange pin-striping highlights the deeper front splitter and tri-strake rear diffuser, no matter the exterior colour chosen. 

As much as I like the Fit Sport’s exclusive and standard Orange Fury paintwork, I love the contrast between the orange pin-striping and glossy black lower bodywork found with my tester’s $300 optional White Orchid Pearl, but if neither is to your liking Honda also provides $300 Crystal Black Pearl as a third available colour with this Sport trim. Of note, the colour palette isn’t as limited with the other trims, including Modern Steel Metallic (medium grey), Milano Red, and Aegean Blue Metallic. 

2018 Honda Fit Sport
Sport trim and above get fog lamps and 16-inch alloys, although these black rims are reserved for the Sport. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Finishing off the Fit Sport’s exterior is a set of gloss-black painted 16-inch alloys, plus a chromed exhaust finisher and “SPORT” liftgate badge. 

The Fit Sport also boasts an all-black cabin with unique orange contrast stitching, a theme that really caught my eye. Honda stitches the leather-wrapped steering wheel, leather-clad manual shift knob and boot, front centre armrest, front seat bolsters, and all five headrests with the trendy orange thread, while the fabric inserts get an attractive geometric pattern highlighted with a little more orange for good measure. It’s a tasteful combination that should please sport compact performance fans stepping up to the Fit Sport model. 

2018 Honda Fit Sport
The Fit Sport’s mostly black cabin gets cool new orange highlights. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Sport trim comes with or without Honda’s available Honda Sensing system, a technologically advanced package that includes autonomous emergency braking, lane/road departure warning with mitigating assist, and adaptive cruise control, upping the Fit Sport’s price by $1,300, which is the same amount if added to the LX (it comes standard on EX and EX-L Navi trims). This is a really good deal when factoring in this new price also includes the optional continuously variable transmission (CVT), but at the same time take note that manually equipped cars, like my tester, don’t receive the same safety advantages. 

2018 Honda Fit Sport
Other than some small details the 2018 Fit cabin is mostly carryover. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Also notable, Fits upgraded with Honda Sensing don’t include auto high beams, which is only an issue because Toyota has been equipping its competitive Yaris with similar advanced driver-assistance systems since the 2017 model year. The Honda rival also features a pre-collision system with autonomous emergency braking capability and lane departure alert, albeit no lane/road departure mitigation or adaptive cruise control. Still, that all of this active safety is available from its $15,475 base trim level is impressive. 

2018 Honda Fit Sport
The gauge cluster is bright and colourful, yet the same as last year’s Fit. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

As is usual for mid-cycle makeovers the new 2018 Fit didn’t receive any updates under the hood, but with 130 horsepower and 114 lb-ft of torque on tap I can hardly complain. Also worth mentioning, Honda lightened up the base DX model by a significant 44 kilos (97 lbs), the changes likely trickling through Fit trim lines and therefore aiding performance of this new Sport as well. Either way, the direct-injection 16-valve, DOHC, i-VTEC-enhanced 1.5-litre four-cylinder felt plenty feisty when foot hit the throttle pedal, its quick response accompanied by a nice high-revving engine note and wonderfully smooth operation, while the standard six-speed manual was up to Honda’s usual DIY gearbox brilliance. 

2018 Honda Fit Sport
Fit faithful will immediately notice a really helpful change to the 2018 model’s centre stack. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Option out the Sport with the CVT and along with the aforementioned Honda Sensing features it’ll also come with a nice set of steering wheel-mounted paddle shifters, a bonus that benefits EX and EX-L Navi trims too. I’ve experienced these before and they certainly increase driver engagement during downshifts, while offering the ability to upshift earlier to save fuel. 

2018 Honda Fit Sport
A closer look shows a volume knob added to the otherwise touch capacitive centre display. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Yes, fuel economy once again matters in Canada. Of course, how much it will matter will depend on where you’re reading from, but in my hometown of Vancouver it’s a very serious issue (at the time of writing the cheapest pump price was 154.9 for regular). I won’t venture into politics on this platform, but we’re probably best not to believe highly charged issues like pipelines and carbon taxes, not to mention the rising price per barrel of crude, will be diffused anytime soon, plus on top of this are national and global economies that are shaky at best, so it’s probably a good time to keep ongoing costs down by choosing a thrifty car. 

2018 Honda Fit Sport
The standard HVAC interface is nicely laid out and easy to use, but move up to EX and EX-L Navi models and the automatic system is a real feast for the eyes. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

To that end, Honda claims an impressive five-cycle fuel economy rating of 8.1 L/100km city, 6.6 highway and 7.4 combined with the manual, 7.0 L/100km city, 5.9 highway and 6.5 combined with the CVT in LX trim, or alternatively 7.6, 6.5 and 7.0 combined in EX trim and above. This represents a marginal improvement when compared to last year’s claimed fuel economy. 

2018 Honda Fit Sport
The Fit Sport gets stylish orange stitching on the shift knob and boot, plus the steering wheel, centre armrest and seats. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Long-time readers will know I’ve always appreciated the Fit’s driving dynamics, but the new 2018 version is even better. First off, Honda retuned the suspension dampers, while also making its electric power-assisted rack-and-pinion steering system a bit stiffer, and provided more rigidity to the body shell due to extra reinforcements. Along with handling this improves crash resistance, quietness and ride quality, the latter two excellent over my weeklong test. 

My Sport model also had the advantage of the previously noted wheels and tires, adding an inch to DX and LX trims that come stock with 15-inch steel wheels and covers, but other than the performance gains allowed by its manual transmission, EX and EX-L Navi trims should handle just as well as they ride on 16-inch rims and rubber too, although take note the two upper trims don’t benefit from the performance gains allowed by a manual transmission. 

2018 Honda Fit Sport
All Fit trims get comfortable front seats, while the Sport gets attractive orange detailing. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

As for refinement, the stiffer body structure was joined by revised transmission and steering system mounting hardware, plus acoustic-laminated glass and increased insulation. Without a back-to-back comparison from old to new it’s difficult to notice such improvements, but on the positive I never had issue with the old model and certainly found the new one nice and quiet. 

2018 Honda Fit Sport
Rear seat roominess is excellent, and comfort good for the class. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

The Fit’s improved refinement is certainly not due to any upgrades in soft premium surfacing treatments, but the pliable synthetic bolstering on the instrument panel ahead of the front passenger continues to be a more upscale touch than some competitors while the quality of hard matte plastics is good for the class, plus the fit and finish is excellent and the upgraded trim details make this Sport model feel quite special. Along with everything already mentioned there’s plenty of satin aluminum-look accenting, a tasteful supply of piano black lacquer, and most importantly those segment-leading electronic interfaces noted earlier. 

2018 Honda Fit EX-L Navi in Lunar Silver
Unique in the segment, the Fit’s innovative rear Magic Seats flip upward for taller cargo. (Photo: Honda)

The carryover gauge cluster is a well lit, colourful mostly analogue affair that’s easy to read no matter the light, its rightmost dial filled with a handy multi-information display for quick access to key details, while the centre touchscreen grows from 5.0 to 7.0 inches in LX trim and above, and comes fitted with a bright and clear backup camera featuring dynamic guidelines, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, Siri Eyes Free, text message functionality, Wi-Fi tethering, the HondaLink Assist automatic emergency response system, and a second USB port. Additionally, those who prefer adjusting audio settings from the radio display will appreciate a new rotating volume knob on the left side of the screen. 

2018 Honda Fit EX-L Navi in Lunar Silver
This photo of a 2018 Honda Fit EX-L Navi, pulled from Honda’s press site, shows how helpful the flat-folding front passenger seat can be for stowing longer cargo. (Photo: Honda)

Other notable features pulled up to my Sport model from lesser trims include multi-reflector halogen headlights, heatable powered side mirrors, a rear rooftop spoiler, power locks with remote access, power windows, illuminated steering wheel-mounted switchgear, cruise control, tilt and telescopic steering, filtered air conditioning, Bluetooth mobile phone connectivity with streaming audio, four-speaker 160-watt AM/FM/MP3/WMA audio, two 12-volt power outlets, heatable front seats, the Fit’s unique 60/40-split second-row Magic Seat, 60/40 split-folding rear seatbacks, a cargo cover, cargo area tie-down hooks, front disc and rear drum brakes with ABS, and the usual assortment of active and passive safety features, while on top of everything already mentioned Sport trim adds auto-on/off headlights, two more stereo speakers and 20 additional watts of power to the audio system, plus more. 

2018 Honda Fit EX-L Navi
Here you can see the front seatbacks lowered for the Fit’s camping mode. (Photo: Honda)

I always appreciate the little things that make the Fit’s interior so livable, like the pop-out cupholder on the left side of the steering wheel that lets you keep your drink a bit cooler or warmer depending on the temperature of air blowing through the vent just behind. This said I would’ve appreciated being able to get the Sport trim level with some of the features found on upper trims, such as the EX model’s proximity-sensing keyless access and pushbutton ignition, Honda’s awesome LaneWatch blindspot display that projects a rearward view of the passenger’s side lane onto the centre touchscreen, and powered moonroof, or the EX-L Navi’s automatic climate control, navigation, satellite and HD radio, etc. 

2018 Honda Fit Sport
The Fit provides plenty of space behind the rear seats too. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Still, it’s difficult to get too upset with any Fit trim level, as all come standard with the most configurable passenger/cargo setup in the subcompact class. For starters, with its rear seats laid flat a total of 1,492 litres (52.7 cubic feet) is available. Better yet, when the backrests of the Fit’s rear Magic Seats are upright it’s possible to flip their lower cushions upwards for yet more cargo capacity, especially helpful for loading in taller items like bicycles or plants, this combining for a collective 609 litres (21.5 cubic feet) of available cargo space when including the Fit’s dedicated luggage area in back, which measures 470 litres (16.6 cubic feet). What’s more, the front passenger’s seat can be folded forward to allow ultra-long cargo inside, while both front seats can be laid completely flat when their headrests are removed, providing a large safe place for impromptu camping. 

2018 Honda Fit Sport
With rear seats lowered, nothing in the subcompact class can touch the Fit’s load carrying capacity. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

No competitor comes close to the Fit for passenger and cargo flexibility, yet even if it was only as useful as its peers behind the first row it would still be one of the best in its class, so make sure you check this little Honda out before choosing one of its challengers. Also important for you to know, Honda offers the identical seating setup and many of the same features in the Fit’s platform-sharing HR-V subcompact SUV, so even if your heart is set on a sport ute you can still enjoy this smart, efficient design. It appears Honda has all subcompact bases covered.

In case you missed it, the 2018 Fit, 2018 Accord, and 2018 Odyssey received Residual Value Awards from ALG, which means that all three are predicted to lead their segments in retained value after three…

Honda earns three 2018 ALG Residual Value awards

2018 Honda Fit Sport
The 2018 Honda Fit, showing here in its new Sport trim, has earned an ALG Residual Value Award in its subcompact class. (Photo: Honda)

In case you missed it, the 2018 Fit, 2018 Accord, and 2018 Odyssey received Residual Value Awards from ALG, which means that all three are predicted to lead their segments in retained value after three years of ownership.

Key to retaining value is class leading quality, leading-edge technologies and market acceptance, all descriptors of the three winning Hondas, with the redesigned 2018 Fit adding more style, soft-touch premium surfaces, digital interfaces and available equipment to its subcompact category, while maintaining its class-leading passenger and cargo versatility, allowing it to take top honours in ALG’s “Subcompact Car” category for four consecutive years.

2018 Honda Accord Touring 1.5T
The new 2018 Honda Accord seems to be winning everything lately, so earning ALG’s best in class Residual Value Award only makes sense. (Photo: Honda)

The 2018 Accord’s redesign has even been more comprehensive, and delivers an even more compelling argument for ownership in its mid-size sedan segment. ALG particularly noted above-average technology, safety and driving dynamics, all of which combined to earn it highest marks in ALG’s “Midsize Car” category.

Lastly, the redesigned 2018 Odyssey has addressed the minivan segment with some innovative ideas, including totally unique multi-configurable Magic Slide second-row seats, plus CabinWatch and CabinTalk technologies that take the old conversation mirror to new levels, helping it win ALG’s “Minivan” category.

2018 Honda Odyssey
The 2018 Honda Odyssey has some unique innovations that set it apart within the minivan segment. (Photo: Honda)

Annual ALG Residual Value Awards are given to vehicles based on their predicted ability to retain their original price after three years of purchase. Awards are meted out in 26 categories.

2018 Honda Odyssey
Leading-edge technology is a key ingredient to a car’s longevity in the marketplace, and the three Hondas chosen by ALG show a lot of leadership in this respect. (Photo: Honda)

“Strong residual values are the bedrock of successful brands. A vehicle’s ability to retain its value over time is an important consideration for consumers looking to purchase or lease a vehicle,” said Jim Nguyen, president of ALG. “With vehicle leasing at near-record levels and headwinds for used vehicle values on the horizon, consumers can have confidence in their choice of a Residual Value Award winner for their next vehicle.”

ALG award winners are chosen after carefully studying all the competitors in each category, including their historical performance and industry trends. Other deciding factors include model and brand quality, production levels relative to market demand, plus pricing and marketing strategies.

Earning three ALG Residual Value awards puts Honda into rare company amongst mainstream volume brands, with only Subaru and Toyota winning more. Subaru split its earnings amongst cars and crossover SUVs, whereas Toyota received all of its honours within the SUV and truck segments. Honda, on the other hand, was strongest in the car sector.

Audi and Subaru have been named best Mainstream Brand and best Premium Brand respectively in ALG’s 2018 Canadian Residual Value Awards (RVA), an important benchmark used for forecasting future vehicle…

Audi and Subaru earn top honours in 2018 ALG Canadian Residual Value Awards

2018 Subaru Impreza
The Subaru Impreza achieved best residual value in its “Compact” class. (Photo: Subaru)

Audi and Subaru have been named best Mainstream Brand and best Premium Brand respectively in ALG’s 2018 Canadian Residual Value Awards (RVA), an important benchmark used for forecasting future vehicle values by auto industry professions.

Now in its 10th year, ALG’s RVA projects future values of new models from 26 separate market segments, ranging from “Alt-fuel” to “Fullsize Commercial Van” and everything in between. There are many ways to measure value, although within the car industry the difference between the initial price paid for a new vehicle and its resale value after three or four years is a key parameter. ALG uses the average ownership duration of four years to determine mainstream volume brand values and three years for premium brands, with the results showing both Subaru and Audi are tops in their respective sectors.

2018 Subaru Crosstrek
The Crosstrek earned best resale value in the “Subcompact Utility” category. (Photo: Subaru)

“Depreciation is the single biggest cost of vehicle ownership, and informed consumers understand the importance of resale value when making their purchase decision,” said Eric Lyman, vice president of ALG. “The ALG Residual Value Award is a meaningful achievement in the hyper-competitive automotive landscape. Residual values are a key indicator for the market success of a vehicle, factoring in quality, product execution and brand desirability as primary drivers of ALG’s forecast.”

This is Subaru’s fourth consecutive RVA mainstream brand win, showing an impressive consistency in quality, execution and desirability. This year the brand earned four segment awards, including the Impreza in the “Compact” class, the Crosstrek in the “Subcompact Utility” segment, the Outback in the “Midsize Utility 2nd Row Seating” segment, and the WRX in the “Sportscar” segment.

2018 Subaru Outback
Subaru’s Outback has the highest residual value in the “Midsize Utility 2nd Row Seating” segment. (Photo: Subaru)

Other notable mainstream brands include Toyota that dominated SUV and truck segments with five RVAs including the Tundra achieving its eighth consecutive year topping the “Fullsize Pickup” category, the Tacoma at five RVA “Midsize Pickup” class awards in a row, the Highlander winning the “Midsize Utility 3rd Row Seating” segment, the 4Runner in the “Off-Road Utility” class, and the Sequoia earning top marks in the “Fullsize Utility” category. Honda received three RVA segment awards including the Fit in the “Subcompact” class, Accord in the “Midsize” category, and Odyssey in the “Minivan” segment.

Nissan managed two winners including the Rogue in the “Compact Utility” class and Maxima in the “Fullsize” segment, while the only one-off deserving mention is Kia’s Niro in the “Alt-fuel” category.

2018 Audi A5 Coupe
Audi’s A5 has the best residual value amongst “Premium Midsize” models. (Photo: Audi)

Audi, which has experienced a dramatic upsurge in new vehicle sales in recent years, achieved four category wins including the A5 in the “Premium Midsize” class, A7 in the “Premium Fullsize” segment, Q5 in the “Premium Compact Utility” segment, and Q7 in the “Premium Midsize Utility 3rd Row Seating” category.

“Audi has emerged in recent years as a contender in the luxury space against top European rivals, finding success with new product entries in the utility space and emphasizing innovative technologies that have resonated well with luxury consumers,” stated an ALG press release.

2018 Audi Q5
The new Q5 is rated highest for resale value in the “Premium Compact Utility” segment. (Photo: Audi)

Mercedes also took home four awards, albeit with two in the commercial sector. The winners included the Metris in the “Midsize Commercial” segment and the Sprinter in the “Fullsize Commercial” category, while its CLA Class took home top marks amongst “Premium Compact” models, and the G-Class achieved the highest score in the “Premium Fullsize Utility” segment.

No other premium brand earned multiple RVAs, but notable mentioned include the Maserati Quattroporte in the “Premium Executive” class, the Porsche 718 Boxster in the “Premium Sportscar” segment, and the Land Rover Range Rover Velar in the “Premium Midsize Utility 2nd Row Seating” category.

The ultra-practical Honda Fit subcompact hatchback gets a thorough mid-cycle refresh for 2018, with edgier styling, a new Sport trim line, and the availability of Honda Sensing advanced driver-assistance…

2018 Fit gets sportier styling and Honda Sensing safety

2018 Honda Fit
The 2018 Fit is available in new Sport trim featuring exclusive Orange Fury paint. (Photo: Honda)

The ultra-practical Honda Fit subcompact hatchback gets a thorough mid-cycle refresh for 2018, with edgier styling, a new Sport trim line, and the availability of Honda Sensing advanced driver-assistance systems.

In a press release, Honda claims this 2018 update adds “youthful, sporty and emotional character” to a model already moving into the fourth year of its third generation, the new 2018 Fit’s styling enhancements including “a horizontally layered, two-piece chrome and piano black grille with a larger, more prominent “H” mark,” plus “more integrated and sophisticated” headlamp clusters that “blend into the side edges of the upper fascia’s wing creating a unified yet more aggressive design.” Additionally, Honda has added new chrome accents to the front bumper plus a full-width splitter below, as well as “more angular fog lights pods” to the frontal design.

2018 Honda Fit
All 2018 Fit trim levels get sportier styling including this top-line EX-L Navi. (Photo: Honda)

The 2018 Fit gets updated combination taillights in the rear and a reworked back bumper too, the latter feature now incorporating a “full-width character line in piano black” plus a “splitter-shaped” lower apron. Lastly, new Orange Fury paint is kept exclusively for an entirely new Sport trim level.

The 2018 Honda Fit is available in the same DX, LX, EX and EX-L Navi trims as last year’s version, now priced at $15,190, $18,590, 21,890 and $23,990 respectively, but new this year is a $19,590 Sport trim that slots in between LX and EX models.

2018 Honda Fit
Changes are most noticeable up front. (Photo: Honda)

A standard aero kit adds muscle to the new Fit Sport’s front, side and rear body panels for a more aggressive look, with bright orange pin-striping highlighting the deeper front splitter and tri-strake rear diffuser, no matter the exterior colour chosen. Additionally, gloss-black painted 16-inch alloys fill out each corner while a chromed exhaust finisher and “SPORT” liftgate badge complete the Fit Sport’s exterior design enhancements. Finally, the Fit Sport boasts an all-black cabin with unique orange contrast stitching.

New 2018 Fit Sport trim may get the exclusive option of Orange Fury paint, but the rest of its colour palette is limited to Crystal Black Pearl and White Orchid Pearl, with Modern Steel Metallic (medium grey), available with the base DX and other trims, taken off the menu. Likewise, Milano Red, available on LX trims and above, plus Aegean Blue Metallic, optional on the EX and EX-L Navi, are unavailable with the Sport.

2018 Honda Fit
Nicely detailed projector headlamps give the Fit a more upscale look. (Photo: Honda)

“With sporty new styling and additional feature content, the 2018 Honda Fit ups the ante with new styling and sophistication not typically found in the subcompact segment,” said Jean Marc Leclerc, Senior Vice-President Sales and Marketing, Honda Canada Inc. “Fit has always represented a great value for subcompact customers and the addition of available Honda Sensing to its fun-to-drive performance and unmatched versatility will keep the Honda Fit as the industry’s benchmark subcompact.”

2018 Honda Fit
Honda has revised the Fit’s rear bumper with a more aggressive design. (Photo: Honda)

Benchmarks in mind, archrival Toyota was first to offer advanced driver-assistance systems to the subcompact category with its 2017 Yaris hatchback, its Safety Sense C suite of driver-assistance systems adding automatic high beams, a pre-collision system with autonomous emergency braking capability, and lane departure alert to its $15,475 base trim level, but the 2018 Fit’s available Honda Sensing system is a more technologically advanced package thanks to autonomous emergency braking joining lane/road departure warning with mitigating assist, as well as adaptive cruise control, although it doesn’t include auto high beams.

Nevertheless, Honda is confident enough to rightly claim the new 2018 Fit with Honda Sensing offers, “the most robust suite of available advanced safety and driver-assistive technologies in its class in Canada.” Choosing Honda Sensing adds $1,300 to the Fit LX and Sport trims, while it comes standard with the Fit EX and EX-L Navi.

2018 Honda Fit
This new “SPORT” badge gets attached to the back of the sportiest Fit. (Photo: Honda)

The 2018 Fit’s direct-injection 16-valve, DOHC, i-VTEC-enhanced 1.5-litre four-cylinder engine is carryover albeit slightly downgraded from 130 to 128 horsepower and 114 to 113 lb-ft of torque, although the car’s claimed curb weight has now been reduced from 1,177 to 1,133 kilos (2,595 to 2,498 lbs) in base form, which should allow for similar if not better performance. Of note, Sport trim with the CVT, plus EX and EX-L Navi models receive standard steering wheel-mounted paddle shifters to improve performance and driver engagement.

2018 Honda Fit
The Fit EX-L Navi comes nicely loaded up. (Photo: Honda)

Honda claims an impressive five-cycle fuel economy rating of 8.1 L/100km in the city, 6.6 on the highway and 7.4 combined with the base six-speed manual, 7.0 L/100km city, 5.9 highway and 6.5 combined with the CVT in LX trim, or alternatively 7.6 L/100km city, 6.5 highway and 7.0 combined in EX trim and above, which only come with the CVT. This represents a marginal improvement when compared to last year’s claimed fuel economy.

The Fit has always delivered excellent driving dynamics for its class, but nevertheless Honda has added retuned suspension dampers to the 2018 model, while also making its electric power-assisted rack-and-pinion steering system more rigid, and providing a stiffer structure overall thanks to more body reinforcements. This helps to improve crash resistance, ride quality and handling prowess, as well as interior refinement, the new Fit said to be quieter than the outgoing model. Along with the stiffer structure, Honda achieved the 2018 Fit’s refinement goals by revising its transmission and steering system mounting hardware, while acoustic-laminated glass and more insulation has been added throughout.

2018 Honda Fit
A mostly digital dash adds colour and functionality to the little Fit. (Photo: Honda)

Standard features for the base 2018 Fit DX include auto-off multi-reflector halogen headlights, heatable powered side mirrors, LED brake lights, power locks with remote access, power windows, intermittent windshield wipers, an intermittent rear wiper/washer, tilt and telescopic steering, a 5.0-inch colour LCD infotainment display, a multi-angle rearview camera, Bluetooth mobile phone connectivity with streaming audio, four-speaker 160-watt AM/FM/MP3/WMA audio, a USB port, a 12-volt power outlet, the Fit’s unique 60/40-split second-row Magic Seat, 60/40 split-folding rear seatbacks, cargo area tie-down hooks, 15-inch steel wheels with covers on 185/6 all-season tires, front disc and rear drum brakes with ABS, electronic brake-force distribution and brake assist, traction and stability control, hill start assist, and the usual assortment of advanced airbags.

2018 Honda Fit
The Fit EX-L Navi gets navigation, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and more. (Photo: Honda)

Additionally, the LX adds a rear rooftop spoiler, illuminated steering wheel-mounted switchgear including cruise control, filtered air conditioning, a new 7.0-inch infotainment touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, Siri Eyes Free, text message functionality, Wi-Fi tethering, a second USB port, the HondaLink Assist automatic emergency response system, a front centre console with an armrest and storage bin, heatable front seats, another 12-volt power outlet, a cargo cover, and more.

On top of everything already mentioned, new Sport trim adds auto-on/off headlights, fog lights, a leather-wrapped steering wheel and shift knob, two more stereo speakers and 20 additional watts of power to the audio system, plus more.

2018 Honda Fit
The 2018 Fit Sport comes standard with a six-speed manual and orange stitching. (Photo: Honda)

EX trim builds on these features with proximity-sensing keyless access with pushbutton ignition, Honda’s impressive LaneWatch blindspot display that projects a rearward view of the passenger’s side lane, a powered moonroof, extendable sunvisors, etcetera.

Lastly, top-line EX-L Navi trim includes LED turn signals integrated into the side mirror housings, automatic climate control, navigation with detailed mapping and voice recognition, satellite and HD radio, leather upholstery, and more.

2018 Honda Fit
Sport trim gets more orange stitching for the seats. (Photo: Honda)

All of this equipment comes in a subcompact hatchback renowned for offering the most accommodating interior in its class. In fact, with its rear seats laid flat a total of 1,492 litres (52.7 cubic feet) is available. Even better, when the backrests of the Fit’s rear Magic Seats are upright it’s possible to flip their lower cushions upwards for yet more cargo capacity, especially helpful for loading in taller items like bicycles or plants, this combining for a collective 609 litres (21.5 cubic feet) of available cargo space when including the Fit’s dedicated luggage area in back. What’s more, the front passenger’s seat can be folded forward to allow ultra-long cargo inside, while both front seats can be laid completely flat when their headrests are removed, providing a large safe place for impromptu camping. No competitor comes close to the Fit when it comes to passenger and cargo flexibility.

2018 Honda Fit
EX-L Navi trim gets leather upholstery, but all Fits feature rear Magic Seats. (Photo: Honda)

Still, the question remains whether all of the Fit’s ongoing attributes, together with the 2018 improvements, will boost its sagging sales numbers, or more precisely whether Honda will be able to keep up to customer demand. To be clear, the roller coaster ride Honda’s smallest car has endured since being available in North America is unusual to say the least. For some background, the first-generation Honda Fit came in with a bang after arriving on Canadian soil in April of 2006 with 10,634 sales, which quickly escalated to 13,507 deliveries in 2007 and then an all-time high of 14,836 down the road in 2008, but since then it’s experienced sales chart mayhem.

2018 Honda Fit
The Fit’s Magic Seats lift completely out of the way for second-row storage. (Photo: Honda)

With more in common with the highly volatile Bitcoin cryptocurrency than anything automotive, Fit sales ebbed to 9,553 units in 2009 despite seeing an all-new second-generation model arrive partway through the year, after which it dropped to 7,900 deliveries the following year, and then plummeted to just 2,835 in 2011. Calendar year 2012 saw improvement to 4,736 units before a strong 2013 with 9,512 buyers, whereas the advent of the current third-generation Fit in 2014 provided 11,732 deliveries for its best sales results so far this decade.

2018 Honda Fit
The Fit’s “Refresh Mode” lets you and some friends relax in side out of the rain or heat. (Photo: Honda)

Since then it’s been on another downward spiral claimed to be due to production issues caused by the immensely popular HR-V subcompact SUV that’s built at the same plant in Celaya, Guanajuato, Mexico, the result being 9,088 Fit deliveries in 2015, 8,622 in 2016, and after six months of 2017 a meager 2,191 units leaving Canadian dealerships. To ease pressure on its Mexican facility and support the car’s many North American advocates Honda started importing additional Fit models from its production facility in Japan, but evidently not enough.

2018 Honda Fit
Something long to carry? You can configure the Fit’s seats to fit in just about anything. (Photo: Honda)

To appreciate how much ground the Fit has lost since last year came to an end, its 8,622 unit total made it second most popular in the subcompact class when compared to the Accent’s 19,198 sales, but by the close of Q2 2017 it stood sixth out of 11 competitors, with two of the segment’s five slowest sellers including a dedicated hybrid and a full electric model. These would be the Toyota Prius C and new Chevrolet Bolt, with the competitors having past it for second, third, fourth and fifth place in the sales race being the Nissan Versa Note with 4,436 deliveries, the new Yaris Family (including the Yaris hatchback and Mazda-sourced Yaris iA sedan) with 3,053, the Mini Cooper with 2,762, and the Chevrolet Sonic with 2,712. Only the Kia Rio and Ford Fiesta, which also experienced dramatic declines in popularity this year, did worse with 2,122 and 1,052 sales respectively, other than also-ran Fiat 500L that only managed a paltry 32 sales during the same six months.

Along with the usual production issues, some of the Fit’s most recent difficulties can likely be blamed on a purposeful slowdown of production ahead of this 2018 model’s launch so that dealers don’t end up with excess stock, but not all. Either way, if you’re hoping to get your hands on a new 2018 Fit it’s probably a good idea to do so sooner than later.