Every car enthusiast loves a good concept, and sometimes a barrage of really intriguing show cars can even rejuvenate a lacklustre carmaker, as we saw with Chrysler’s various brands when they left their…

Fifteen never-before-seen Porsche concept cars show what could have been

2017 Porsche 919 Street
The 2017 Porsche 919 Street is a road-going 919 race car for the street, as the name implies.

Every car enthusiast loves a good concept, and sometimes a barrage of really intriguing show cars can even rejuvenate a lacklustre carmaker, as we saw with Chrysler’s various brands when they left their ‘80s-era mundanity and joined the much more successful (for them) ‘90s.

Porsche has never resembled Chrysler group in the slightest (although the Viper was pretty awesome), and in all fairness has lacked very little in recent decades, except maybe for a 928-inspired front-engine coupe remake (just shorten the wheelbase of a Panamera and call it Panama, in memory of the late, great Eddie Van Halen), or a Cayenne that can once again tackle Moab. Having such a wide assortment of models, trims and special editions is probably why Porsche rarely showed off their concepts, or even their prototypes before introducing a new model, Mission E and a handful of others aside.

2019 Porsche Vision Spyder
Could the 2019 Porsche Vision Spyder concept be the next-generation Boxster in disguise?

Earlier this month, however, the performance-focused brand pulled the covers off of 15 sensational never-before-seen concepts, some obviously created for fun and others as precursors of future products. The massive unveiling all came as part of a new “Porsche Unseen” project that sheds light on the inner operations of the German brand’s design process in a new table-top book of the same name, plus a series of stories in the Porsche Newsroom, a detailed video that spans more than three-quarters of an hour (watch it below), and an expanded exhibit at the automaker’s Zuffenhausen museum.

Summarizing car enthusiasts’ love of concept cars and the importance they play in the development of future models, Chairman of the Executive Board at Porsche AG, Oliver Blume, said, “People all over the world love the timeless and innovative design of our sports cars. Visionary concept studies are the foundation of this success: they provide the pool of ideas for the Porsche design of tomorrow, and combine our strong tradition with trailblazing future technologies.”

2018 Porsche Vision Renndienst
We hate to admit that the 2018 Vision Renndienst would probably sell like crazy if it were produced… and the tiny Porsche badge was replaced by a giant VW emblem up front.

In the initial “Porsche Unseen” project introduction, the automaker highlighted three disparate concepts, including the ultra-performance 919 Street, the sporty, fun Vision Spyder, and oddest of all, the minivan-like Vision Renndienst people-mover, which answers a utilitarian family-hauling question absolutely no one was asking outside of the inner workings of Porsche’s design department.

Created in 2017, the 919 Street is a life-size 1:1 clay model of a road-going 919 Hybrid LMP1 race car, if the name and visuals didn’t give that away already. The 919 Hybrid completely obliterated all LMP1 sports car competitors wherever it raced, Le Mans, France being most notable, notching up four consecutive FIA World Endurance Championships from 2014 to 2017 before retiring, and even breaking the best-ever Formula 1 record around Belgium’s famed Spa Francorchamps race track with an unofficial time of 1:41.770 after removing some of its FIA-sanctioned limitations.

2017 Porsche 919 Street
Well-heeled Porsche fans will be wishing their favourite brand had produced this race car for the street.

Not wanting to hide its heritage, below the 919 Street’s exotic bodywork is the 919 Hybrid race car’s carbon-fibre monocoque and 900 PS hybrid drivetrain, while its dimensions, including its track and wheelbase are identical to the track-only variant. It’s difficult to surmise why Porsche chose not to build the 919 Street, as it would have been gobbled up by collectors within minutes of being announced no matter the price, but alas it remains a museum piece for those fortunate enough to be in Stuttgart next year, or at the very least fortunate enough to purchase Porsche’s new hardcover book.

On a somewhat tamer note, the Porsche Vision Spyder concept was an entirely different design exercise, and being that it was introduced only last year, it could become a future Boxster, or at least influence the convertible version of the next generation 718.

2019 Porsche Vision Spyder
We could get used to a Boxster that looks like this.

Some 911 fans aren’t all that happy that today’s entry-level Porsche sports car duo looks similar to their beloved 911, not to mention shares plenty of the pricier models’ components, so therefore something along the lines of the Vision Spyder might appease purists’ frustrations.

The new concept offers some sharper, more upright lines than the current Boxster, while still including softer more flowing curves across the hood, fenders and rear deck. Its racing livery certainly appears as if the Vision Spyder would be the ideal amateur race driver’s weekend warrior.

Designed as a 1:1 hard model, the Vision Spyder features a mid-engine layout similar to the 718 Boxster, while some of its design cues were reportedly influenced by Porsche’s 550-1500 RS Spyder from 1954. We can’t help seeing the automaker’s 1969-1976 914 in this styling exercise either, particularly its squarer, more angular details, like the roll bar.

2018 Porsche Vision Renndienst
It’s great to see the silly side of Porsche for a change, but then again developing autonomous EVs is big business and therefore no laughing matter.

The aforementioned Porsche minivan wears a faded grey version of the brand’s famed crest on a transparent background, so it’s not as if Porsche is trying to hide its pedigree. Love it or loathe it, the Vision Renndienst (race service) is said to interpret past race support vehicles as it actually depicts an aerodynamic shuttle bus for up to six occupants, one being a driver that sits up front in the centre position (although it features an autonomous driving mode too), not unlike McLaren’s fabulous F1 supercar, in that respect at least.

Unlike that classic British exotic, the Renndienst is electric, having all of its motive drive components housed within a skateboard design below the passenger cell. This allows for optimal interior spaciousness, and potentially superb straight-line performance, if other electrics, such as Porsche’s own Taycan, are anything to go by.

2016 Vision 960 Turismo
With what looks to be the front section of a 918 Spyder mated up to the Panamera’s rear quarters, the 2016 Vision 960 Turismo can be considered a forerunner to the Taycan.

That all-electric super-sedan in mind, Porsche dropped a set of Vision 960 Turismo images along with 11 others just after the initial three arrived, and this four-door coupe might be the most intriguing of all thanks to its Taycan roots. Visually, this four-year-old 1:1 scale model is a 10-year-old 918 Spyder supercar up front and a modern-day Panamera in back, and we think the combination looks absolutely gorgeous.

The Vision E concept, on the other hand, was never meant to be practical, at least not from a two-row, four-seat, roomy hatchback perspective. Instead, the design team hoped to spring a 100-percent electric, 800-volt, fully enclosed, single-seat, near open-wheel, track-only hypercar from Porsche’s Formula E racing program. The 1:1 hard model actually made it to the development stage, which is pretty impressive on its own.

2013 Porsche 904 Living Legend
The 2013 904 Living Legend is the future Porsche sports car we all want to see produced.

Porsche’s 918 RS got all the way to the development stage too. The 1:1 hard model was created on the back of a 918 Spyder last year, complete with unique bodywork including a fixed roof. The stunning potential supercar pulls plenty of design cues from its 918 Spyder donor as well as race cars from Porsche’s past, such as the now classic 917, but unfortunately, you’ll never see one pull up at your local show and shine.

Additional concepts added to Porsche’s new book include the 2005 Targa Florio road race-inspired 906 Living Legends (that featured lighting elements within cooling ducts); the 2013 904 Living Legends that was based on a VW XL1 streamliner eco-diesel’s carbon monocoque chassis, albeit weighing just 900 kg and stuffed full of super-high-revving Ducati V2 motorcycle power (our favourite); the 2016 battery and hub-motor-powered Vision 916; the V8-powered, manually-shifted, and the 2016 Boxster-based Le Mans Living Legend; all of which imagine how older Porsche race cars might look in modernized street dress today, while 2019’s Vision 920 is basically another race car for the road, albeit a futuristic one that never actually competed.

2012 Porsche 911 Vision Safari
Paris-Dakar, here we come! The 2012 Porsche 911 Vision Safari elevates the current 911 4S experience.

On a similar theme, the Boxster Bergspyder, developed in 2014, is a minimalist single-seat track car based on the current Boxster, featuring a 911 Speedster-like shortened windscreen, dual roll hoops hovering over Carrera GT-style rear deck lid double-bubble engine vents, and primary instruments pulled from the 918. Removing the passenger’s seat for weight savings allowed the inclusion of a helmet shelf, which is even more useful than a sunglasses holder. The icing on this lightweight 1,130-kilo barchetta’s cake was the Cayman GT4’s high-revving 3.8-litre flat-six, which just might have made this little 718 the ultimate Porsche track star.

2013 Porsche Macan Vision Safari
Time to toughen up the Macan’s image? We think there’s a market for off-road variants of Porsche’s current SUV lineup.

The 911 Vision Safari never actually raced either, but it does conjure distant memories of the outrageous 1985 959 Paris-Dakar Rothmans-livery rally car (which recently sold on Sotheby’s for a cool $5.945 million USD). No doubt this one-off 2012 991 Carrera 4S would be worth a pretty penny as well, much thanks to its lifted suspension, bulkier bumpers and helmet cooler.

On a more practical note (if anything can possibly be more practical than a helmet cooler), the 2013 Macan Vision Safari was (obvious by the name) a toughened up off-road version of Porsche’s sporty road-going compact crossover SUV. Appearing ready to take on all comers in the just-noted Paris-Dakar rally, this concept makes us wonder if Porsche should consider a more rugged image for its pavement-conquering SUV line.

2016 Porsche Le Mans Living Legend
The sports car enthusiast in your life would love to peruse the pages of the new “Porsche Unseen” book.

Speaking of rugged, the thick, substantive, 328-page “Porsche Unseen” hardcover book includes photos from Stefan Bogner with accompanying text by Jan Karl Baedeker. We think it would make an excellent holiday gift for any sports car enthusiast. It’s published by Delius Klasing Verlag, and made available at Elferspot.com (ISBN number 978-3-667-11980-3), or alternatively at the Porsche Museum shop next to the company’s Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen, Germany headquarters.

Make sure to check out our complete photo gallery above as well as the “Porsche Unseen: Uncovered” video below for more visuals.

Porsche Unseen: Uncovered (47:52):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

If you’re thinking you’ve read this story on these pages before, you’re not losing your mind. We only recently reported on battery output improvements for the new 2021 Porsche Panamera E-Hybrid…

Porsche grows battery size and increases EV range of 2021 Cayenne E-Hybrid models

2021 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid
All Cayenne E-Hybrid SUVs get a larger battery for 2021, lengthening their EV capability by up to 30 percent.

If you’re thinking you’ve read this story on these pages before, you’re not losing your mind. We only recently reported on battery output improvements for the new 2021 Porsche Panamera E-Hybrid models, and now we’re providing a similar update regarding the upgraded 2021 Cayenne E-Hybrids as well.

The new model year will once again see two body styles with two trims apiece, both the more upright Cayenne sport utility and newer, more rakishly shaped Cayenne Coupe getting E-Hybrid and Turbo S E-Hybrid drivetrains, but better optimized cells that improve energy density has allowed the battery in each model to increase its output by 27 percent from 14.1 to 17.9 kWh, resulting in almost 30 percent more range.

2021 Porsche Cayenne E-Hybrid
The larger battery doesn’t improve performance over last year’s Cayenne E-Hybrid models.

Now, 2021 Cayenne E-Hybrid owners should expect seven to eight kilometres of extra EV mobility, from approximately 22 or 23 km to nearly 30 km, which could provide some owners zero-emission commuting capability during daily commutes. The heavier Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid improves its EV range similarly, albeit from 19 or 20 km to about 24 or 25 km.

On top of this, Porsche has changed the way electrified Cayennes use their internal combustion engines (ICE) to charge the battery, now topping it off at just 80 percent instead of 100. While seeming to be making backward progress, the upgrade actually saves fuel and reduces emissions, because the E-Hybrid’s various kinetic energy harvesting systems, such as regenerative braking, are always in use. If the battery were to reach 100 percent, there’s no longer a need to harvest kinetic power.

2021 Porsche Cayenne E-Hybrid
To achieve a 100-percent charge, the new Cayenne E-Hybrid models must be plugged in, because the redesigned kinetic charging system will only bring the battery up to 80 percent.

What’s more, the new 17.9 kWh battery is able to charge at a faster rate in Sport and Sport Plus performance modes, which results in the drive system always have plenty of boost ready and waiting for quicker acceleration runs and easier passing manoeuvres.

Despite the larger battery, there’s no change in net horsepower or combined torque from last year’s Cayenne plug-in hybrids, the new 2021 Cayenne E-Hybrid continuing to produce a substantial 455 net horsepower and 516 lb-ft of torque, and the two Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid models putting out a staggering 670 net horsepower and 663 lb-ft of torque.

Pricing for the 2021 Cayenne E-Hybrid starts at $93,800 plus freight and fees, whereas the Cayenne E-Hybrid Coupe can be had from $100,400, the Turbo S E-Hybrid from $185,600, and the Turbo S E-Hybrid Coupe from $191,200. Porsche is already offering factory leasing and financing rates from zero percent according to CarCostCanada, so make sure to visit their 2021 Porsche Cayenne Canada Prices page to learn more, plus find out how the CarCostCanada system works so you can access the latest leasing and financing rates from all models, plus rebate information and even dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands, and remember to download the free CarCostCanada app so you can access all this information exactly when you need it.

2021 Porsche Cayenne E-Hybrid
All Cayenne models have a beautifully detailed interior with premium quality materials and the latest electronics.

The standard Cayenne E-Hybrid will hit 100 km/h from a standing start in only 5.0 seconds flat when equipped with the Sport Chrono Package, ahead of a top track speed of 253 km/h, while a Sport Chrono Package equipped Cayenne E-Hybrid Coupe needs 0.1 seconds more to reach the same speed, although tops out at the identical terminal velocity. Both regular and coupe Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid models achieve the same 3.8-second sprint to 100 km/h, mind you, while their collective top speed is 295 km/h.

The 2021 Cayenne E-Hybrid and 2021 Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid are now available to order at a Porsche retailer near you, while deliveries are expected in the spring of 2021.

 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

Just in case you missed it, racing legend Jeff Zwart, already with 16 Pikes Peak hill climbs to his credit, blasted up the steep 20 km road course in a 700 horsepower, rear-wheel drive 935 remake worth…

Pikes Peak legend Jeff Zwart achieves 09:43.92-minute time in rare Porsche 935

Jeff Zwart in a Porsche 935 tribute at the 2020 Pikes Peak International Hill Climb
Driving legend Jeff Zwart piloted this ultra-rare Porsche 935 reissue up the 20-km Pikes Peak hillclimb in just 09:43.92 minutes.

Just in case you missed it, racing legend Jeff Zwart, already with 16 Pikes Peak hill climbs to his credit, blasted up the steep 20 km road course in a 700 horsepower, rear-wheel drive 935 remake worth some $780,000 USD when introduced in 2018 (which equals $1,032,696 CAD at the time of writing).

Despite achieving a time of 09:43.92 minutes for fifth overall and second in the car’s Time Attack 1 class, the latter specifically for track and race cars based on production models, Zwart admitted taking it a bit easier than he might have otherwise driven due to the 935 in question being someone else’s car and not having driven the course for five years. He nevertheless praised the 935 for ease of use.

Jeff Zwart in a Porsche 935 tribute at the 2020 Pikes Peak International Hill Climb
Zwart claimed the 935 is “… the most comfortable race car I’ve ever driven,” attested to in the video below.

“It’s the most comfortable race car I’ve ever driven,” commented Zwart. “The combination of the turbo, the bodywork and the motorsport chassis is wonderful.”

The 935, which weighs in at just 1,380 kilos (3,042 lbs), is one of just 77 produced since introduced during the historic “Rennsport Reunion” motorsport event at California’s Laguna Seca Raceway on September 27, 2018. It’s a race-prepared single-seater that rides on Porsche’s 991-generation 911 GT2 RS platform (that sold for a lofty $334,000 on its own in 2018), but gets completely unique 935-like bodywork from front to rear, the latter featuring an elongated tail section (like the original) designed specifically to increase downforce.

Jeff Zwart in a Porsche 935 tribute at the 2020 Pikes Peak International Hill Climb
The unique white, grey and red “Pegasus” livery is attributed to main sponsor Mobil 1.

This specific 935 reissue is owned by Porsche collector Bob Ingram, and ran in support of his son Cam’s Porsche restoration shop. It was painted in a white, grey and red livery with a stylized Pegasus on each rear fender due to Mobil 1 sponsorship.

The fastest time belonged to Clint Vahsholt who drove a Formula Ford in the Open Wheel category, with a time of 09:35.490, while the quickest Porsche was a GT2 RS Clubsport driven by David Donn, who, also in the Time Attack 1 class, managed a time of just 9:36.559.

Jeff Zwart in a Porsche 935 tribute at the 2020 Pikes Peak International Hill Climb
The 935 arguably looks even better in its exposed carbon fibre bodywork.

Colorado’s Pikes Peak road course is officially 19.99 kilometres (12.42 miles) long and includes 156 turns, climbs an elevation of 1,440 metres (4,720 ft) that average 7.2-percent grades. It starts at Mile 7 on Pikes Peak Highway and ends at an elevation of 4,302 metres (14,115 ft). Multiple classes of vehicles compete yearly in the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb, making it a must-see event for motorsport fans.

To learn more about 911s that we mere mortals can potentially buy (935s like the one Jeff Zwart used to scale Pikes Peak now fetch upwards of $1.5m USD on the used market), check out CarCostCanada’s 2021 Porsche 911 Canada Prices page and 2020 Porsche 911 Canada Prices page, where you’ll find important information about factory leasing and financing rates from zero-percent, as well as all the latest rebate info and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands. Remember to download the free CarCostCanada app too, so you can have all their money-saving info with you when you need it most.

Now, be sure to check out the video of Jeff Zwart piloting the 935 at this year’s Pikes Peak International Hill Climb below:

Jeff Zwart | Full Run Onboard + Driver Interview | 2020 Pikes Peak International Hill Climb (11:00):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

To many sports fans, esports aren’t actually counted as sport. Certainly, esports require high levels of stamina and skill, not to mention finite concentration, coordination and a modicum of intelligence…

Porsche Esports Sprint Challenge Canada winner Brandon Hawkin gets day on track

Porsche Esports Sprint Challenge Canada winner Brandon Hawkin gets day on track
The Porsche Esports Sprint Challenge Canada series featured digital versions of the brand’s race-prepped 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport.

To many sports fans, esports aren’t actually counted as sport. Certainly, esports require high levels of stamina and skill, not to mention finite concentration, coordination and a modicum of intelligence to reach the top echelons of a given game, which are all attributes of top-tier athletes, but as anyone who’s driven a car on a track knows, merely mastering a simulator doesn’t make for a competitive racer in the real world.

This said, every modern-day Formula One driver spends countless hours at the controls of their teams’ high-end simulators, virtually tackling every track on the calendar in order to hone their race craft and likewise prepare their team for what they may be facing ahead of an F1 weekend. The same can be said for most any professional car racing series, which makes esports particularly relevant in the motorsport community. In fact, F1 drivers and other series competitors have gone head-to-head in the digital arena, especially this year before cars took to the track, putting the e-drivers that took part in Porsche’s new Esports Sprint Challenge in rarified company.

Porsche Esports Sprint Challenge Canada winner Brandon Hawkin gets day on track
Contestant Brandon Hawkin won every race and therefore becomes the series’ undisputed winner, earning a real life opportunity to drive on a race course with the Porsche Track Experience program.

Porsche doesn’t compete in F1, or for that matter in sports prototype racing series at tracks like Le Mans anymore, its 919 hybrid having taken the overall win at that renowned 24-hour event three years in a row from 2015 through 2017. Porsche also holds title to the winningest brand at the famed circuit, while special race prepped versions of its road cars are fielded by many teams in other FIA sports car categories and additional series, plus the performance brand is now heavily invested in Formula E, the FIA-sanctioned all-electric racing series. Now we can add esports to Porsche’s motorsport activities, thanks to the Porsche Esports Sprint Challenge Canada one-make virtual race series.

The Esports Sprint Challenge Canada series was launched in May, 2020, together with renowned online games company iRacing.com. iRacing, which is best known for its “Grand Prix Legends” and NASCAR 2003” games, created a game that pitted virtual 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport cars against each other on popular race tracks, the final at the famed Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal.

Porsche Esports Sprint Challenge Canada winner Brandon Hawkin gets day on track
The 29 other contestants took away participation prices from Porsche and credits from iRacing.com.

While 30 contestants took part, the series was dominated by Brandon Hawkin from Lindsay, Ontario, who won every race.

“The series was organized very professionally and it was a pleasure to race with everyone – what a fantastic experience,” commented Hawkin. “It will be extremely memorable based on how competitive the series was with lots of track battles.”

William Levesque ended up second in the Esports Sprint Challenge Canada championship, with Giovanni Romano taking a respectable third place. Along with the pride of winning and the series trophy, Hawkin will join Porsche Canada at an actual race track for the Porsche Experience program, an opportunity of a lifetime for any sports car enthusiast.

Porsche Esports Sprint Challenge Canada winner Brandon Hawkin gets day on track
“Driving a Porsche on track is something I’ve wanted to do since I was a child,” said series champion Brandon Hawkin.

“Driving a Porsche on track is something I’ve wanted to do since I was a child,” added Hawkin. “I’m so excited and thankful that I’ll now get that chance and join the Porsche Track Experience program!”

Porsche provided alternative prizes for the 29 contestants that trailed Hawkin, while iRacing provided credits to take part in online games.

“It was incredible to see the group of talented sim racers we have across Canada push each other in the virtual racing world,” stated Marc Ouayoun, President and CEO, Porsche Cars Canada, Ltd. “Congratulations to all the competitors, especially to Brandon Hawkin, as he will have the chance to bring his skill sets to life at Porsche Track Experience in the very near future.”

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

It’s official, a new Guinness World Record for fastest slalom time has been set by 16-year old Chloe Chambers who managed to slice through 50 evenly placed cones in just 47.45 seconds. Chambers, with…

Talented teenager smashes Guinness world slalom record in Porsche 718 Spyder

Chloe Chambers driving Porsche 718 Spyder for Guinness World Record in slalom
Talented 16-year old kart racer Chloe Chambers just set a Guinness World slalom Record while driving a new 2020 Porsche 718 Spyder.

It’s official, a new Guinness World Record for fastest slalom time has been set by 16-year old Chloe Chambers who managed to slice through 50 evenly placed cones in just 47.45 seconds.

Chambers, with five years of kart racing under her belt, joined up with Porsche to achieve the feat, and did so at the wheel of a 2020 Porsche 718 Spyder, smashing the previous record of 48.11 seconds set in 2018 by Jia Qiang, who was driving a Chevrolet Camaro.

“It looks easy, but it’s really not – to weave between 50 cones as fast as possible, trying to beat a record time and knowing I couldn’t touch a single one for the run to count – I definitely felt the pressure,” said Chambers. “Everything came together on my final run; the car worked beautifully and I found the grip I needed. Thank you to my family and to Porsche for supporting and believing in me.”

Chloe Chambers driving Porsche 718 Spyder for Guinness World Record in slalom
Chambers looking confident at the wheel of Porsche’s 414-hp 718 Spyder.

The 718 Spyder is powered by a special naturally-aspirated 414 horsepower 4.0-litre “boxer” six-cylinder engine that comes complete with a lofty 8,000-rpm capability (and 7,600-rpm redline), while it’s exclusively mated up to a six-speed manual transmission. Like the 718 Boxster roadster and 718 Cayman coupe, the 718 Spyder mounts its motor just ahead of the rear wheels for an optimal mid-engine layout, making it particularly adept at high-speed handling.

The 718 Spyder, which shares mechanicals with the 718 Cayman GT4, also incorporates a “track-bred” Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) system including adaptive dampers, helper springs at the rear axle, plus a 30-mm (1.18-inch) ride height reduction when compared to the standard 718 Boxster or 718 Cayman.

Chloe Chambers driving Porsche 718 Spyder for Guinness World Record in slalom
Chambers signed this Guinness World Records hat with a record-setting slalom time of 47.45 seconds.

“We couldn’t be more proud that Chloe set the record,” said Klaus Zellmer, President and CEO of Porsche Cars North America. “From the whole Porsche family, we send our heartfelt congratulations – we’re pleased to have been able to support Chloe with her ambitious record attempt and share her relief that it was successful.”

Porsche is now offering the 2020 718 Spyder, 2020 718 Boxster and 2020 718 Cayman (including the GT4) with factory leasing and financing rates from zero percent according to CarCostCanada. Make sure to visit CarCostCanada to learn more, and remember that a CarCostCanada membership will also provide any available rebate information, plus dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands on your next purchase. You can now download the free CarCostCanada app from the Apple Store or Google Store, which provides all this critical information exactly when you need it.

 

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche