Everyone who follows the auto industry knew that Tesla’s Model S would eventually get knocked from its first-place sales pedestal in the mid-size electric luxury sedan segment (which is actually a thing…

Beige doesn’t mean boring when applied to Porsche’s new Taycan GTS Hockenheimring Edition

The new 2022 Porsche Taycan GTS Hockenheimring Edition looks good on the racetrack.
The new Hockenheimring Edition should be as impressive on the track as any Taycan GTS.

Everyone who follows the auto industry knew that Tesla’s Model S would eventually get knocked from its first-place sales pedestal in the mid-size electric luxury sedan segment (which is actually a thing now), but some might’ve expected the upstart EV replacing it at the top to be from some all-new brand like Lucid. As we all now know it was Porsche’s Taycan that took best-selling honours in this category last year, let alone every month since.

To be fair to Tesla, its flagship four-door has been with us mostly unchanged for a decade, which is a surprisingly long stint for any car and certainly testament to how advanced the original was when it came on the market in 2012. Then again, one glance at the Taycan and the Model S looks downright frumpy, which was no doubt part of Porsche’s plan when penning the now three-year old BEV.

Taycan GTS Hockenheimring Edition commemorates 90 years of famed racetrack

The new 2022 Porsche Taycan GTS Hockenheimring Edition looks good from the rear.
Enough beige for you? Oh yah, it’s not beige, but rather Stone Grey with Bronzite highlights.

So, how should Porsche celebrate this monumental occasion? Once again breaking the track record at the legendary Nürburgring Nordschleife might be a good idea, especially since the only car to do so was a preproduction Taycan Turbo back in 2019 that, while achieving a pretty impressive lap time of 7:42.34 minutes and therefore making Tesla’s four-year old 8:50-minute lap of a Model S P85D look as if it was merely cruising along in “chill” mode, got walloped by an updated 2021 Model S that ran the ring in just 7:35.579 last fall, no doubt in Plaid track mode.

Thus far Porsche hasn’t taken the bait, but they’ve nevertheless conjured up a new special edition that pays tribute to 90 years of motorsport on Germany’s second-most famous race course, the Hockenheimring, and while only available in Europe and therefore somewhat useless information for any Canadian that doesn’t also own a hunting cabin in the Black Forest or ski lodge in Chamonix, it’s a worthy racetrack to commemorate and a nicely dressed up Taycan to boot.

Hockenheimring has a long history of notable winners

2022 Porsche Taycan GTS Hockenheimring Edition
Each two-tone painted 21-inch alloy wheel wears Stone Grey and Bronzite.

The Hockenheimring, located in Baden-Württemberg, Germany, hosted Formula 1 as recently as 2019, but was a regular haunt of motorsport’s supreme series from 1977 to 2006, except for 1985 when the German Grand Prix was held at a reconfigured Nürburgring circuit, which had lost F1 in 1976 due to safety concerns.

The great Michael Schumacher achieved four Formula 1 victories at the Hockenheimring, while plenty of other racing greats have competed in DTM (Deutsche Tourenwagen Masters), a.k.a. the German Touring Car championship, World RX (rallycross), EuroNASCAR, and the World Endurance (Sportscar) Championship, in which Porsche has run away with many class victories and championships.

Stunning Stone Grey beige earth-tone joined by beautiful Bronzite highlights

Setting this special model apart are "90th Hockenheimring Edition" badges on the outer B pillars.
Special “90th Hockenheimring Edition” badges are attached to the B pillars, while additional versions of this logo can be found elsewhere.

No doubt the new 2022 Taycan GTS Hockenheimring Edition’s most eye-catching feature is its Stone Grey exterior paint, which we dare you to call beige. As if a car that can sprint from zero to 100 km/h in just 3.7 seconds could ever be considered beige, let alone one that looks as dramatic as any Taycan, but it’s also a bit browner than grey, so we’ll have to accept that Porsche used some creative license when positioning this hue within their “Heritage” colour palette’s nomenclature and leave it there.

It’s part of Porsche’s Paint to Sample program, as is Bronzite that gets used for the five twinned spokes of this unique Taycan’s 21-inch Mission E Design alloy wheels, the rims painted in Stone Grey to match the car’s bodywork. Bronzite also adorns the car’s side skirts, rear diffuser, and Taycan badges.

Island Green highlights combine with Paldao hardwood inside

Special Island Green leather gets used for the steering wheel's centre marker.
Island Green dye highlights the centre marker on the leather-wrapped steering wheel rim.

The Taycan GTS Hockenheimring Edition’s cabin is slightly more subtle in execution than its sheet metal, much due to black leather being used throughout, except for a thin strip of Island Green leather found atop the steering wheel as a centre marking. Island Green stitching gets used in all the right places too, while Paldao hardwood inlays dress up key areas and yet more Bronzite can be found where satin-silver might otherwise be, including the steering wheel spokes, gear lever and surrounding area, HVAC vent slats, and even the rim around each cupholder.

Additionally, the Hockenheimring Edition’s carpeted floor mats get yet more Island Green highlights, while a Hockenheimring track map and special logo get embossed into the leather-clad centre armrest, as does the key fob, illuminated door sills, and projector LEDs that light up the ground below the doors. Capping this special model off, Porsche fixed a special badge with the same logo and track layout to the outer B pillars.

New Hockenheimring Edition built on ultra-quick Taycan GTS underpinnings

The new Taycan GTS Hockenheimring Edition, which is only available as a sedan, makes 590 horsepower and 626 pound-feet of torque, which means that along with its aforementioned 3.7-second run from standstill to 100 km/h, it can manage a terminal velocity of 250 km/h, while GTS trim also provides the longest WLTP-estimated range of any other Taycan trim, at 504 km.

Taycan GTS Hockenheimring Edition. Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur (1:36) (Note: this video is in German):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

Ah, nostalgia. There comes a point in life when the “good old days” can seem more appealing to some than the unending fast-paced changes occurring in today’s world. Certainly, some things get better,…

Porsche pulls on our nostalgic heartstrings with its new 911 Sport Classic

2023 Porsche 911 Sport Classic
Porsche’s new 911 Sport Classic combines Turbo and Turbo S mechanicals with a manual gearbox, rear-drive, and cool retro styling.

Ah, nostalgia. There comes a point in life when the “good old days” can seem more appealing to some than the unending fast-paced changes occurring in today’s world. Certainly, some things get better, like Porsche’s 911, but many of Canada’s more mature citizens would no doubt love to transport themselves back to “better times”.

That’s what Porsche is attempting to do, at least emotively, with the fabulous new 911 Sport Classic, which only recently debuted. It’s a retrospective look back to the past that, while pulling design cues from the ‘70s, particularly the ducktail spoiler at back, remains a 100-percent functional and reliable modern-day 911; a best of both world’s scenario for those whose hearts long for exhilarating Saturday drives behind the wheel of their 1973 911 RS, but wallets may not want to invest so much into a car.

Sadly, if you don’t already own an early 911 Carrera 2.7 RS, prices for pristine examples have soared past seven figures (the DuPont Registry has one on sale now for $919,000 USD or $1.2 million CAD), making the much more approachable sum of $235,600 CAD for today’s 911 Turbo S seem like a bargain, or alternatively, whatever Porsche finally settles on for the new 911 Sport Classic.

Near 911 Turbo power with a manual gearbox and rear-wheel drive

2023 Porsche 911 Sport Classic
The 911 Sport Classic is second in Porsche’s “Heritage Design” series, and the first to come to Canada.

That price has yet to be announced, but it will likely be higher than the window sticker of today’s 911 Turbo S. After all, under the Sport Classic’s skin is a one-of-a-kind rear-wheel drive Porsche Turbo S, which kind of makes it a forerunner to a future 992-based GT2. Until that supercar arrives, this is the only way you’re getting a new 911 Turbo with rear-wheel drive, let alone one with a seven-speed manual transmission.

Today’s 911 Turbo and Turbo S are only available with Porsche Traction Management (PTM) all-wheel drive and the brand’s brilliant eight-speed Doppelkupplung (PDK) dual-clutch gearbox, so while the new Sport Classic’s acceleration time might not quite measure up to the regular Turbo S’ all-wheel traction and quicker shifting PDK, these technologies aiding its blisteringly quick 2.7-second sprint from standstill to 100 km/h and harrowing top speed of 330 km/h (205 mph), purists anteing up for this drive back to yesteryear would only be satisfied with a manually-actuated rear driver.

This said, the Turbo S’ 641 horsepower 3.8-litre twin-turbocharged horizontally opposed six, featuring 590 lb-ft of torque, is not part of the package, instead replaced by the regular Turbo’s 3.7-litre mill, normally good for a 2.8-second zero to 100 km/h acceleration time, albeit further detuned from 572 horsepower and 553 lb-ft of torque to 543 horsepower and 442 lb-ft. The revised engine mapping was necessary to make the engine more compatible with the manual gearbox, but once again, purists won’t complain. After all, this new rear-drive retro-rod is more potent than the sensational 502-horsepower 911 GT3.

Turbo S wide-body and underpinnings makes for muscular styling and superior handling

2023 Porsche 911 Sport Classic
The Sport Classic builds on the muscular wide-body shape of the Turbo S, with plenty of unique styling details.

So, if the Sport Classic utilizes a detuned version of the regular 911 Turbo’s 3.7-litre engine, why say it’s based on a Turbo S? Porsche’s reference has more to do with its wide-body layout that also includes upgraded brakes, wheels, tires, and suspension enhancements. Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes (PCCB) with subtly painted black calipers are framed by a stunning set of staggered 20- and 21-inch 911 Sport Classic wheels on 255/35 ZR20 and 315/30 ZR21 performance tires front to rear, the former being “a modern re-interpretation of the Fuchs design,” says Porsche.

Also notable is the Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) Sport suspension upgrade with 10 millimetres (0.4 in) of overall height reduction, while the front axle spring rates have been decreased slightly to adjust for the lower frontal mass of the missing all-wheel drivetrain.

Hidden within, yet no doubt noticeable when taking the wheel, is Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control (PDCC) and Rear Axle Steering as standard equipment, plus, of course, Porsche’s revered Sport Chrono Package, while the engine note should make a special tune derived by a uniquely modified Sport Exhaust system.

Fast yes, but the 911 Sport Classic is just as much about style

2023 Porsche 911 Sport Classic
The ’70s era ducktail spoiler is just one of many special upgrades.

As sensational as this car is mechanically, being the most powerful Porsche currently available with a manual transmission and rear-wheel drive, for many the initial attraction will be styling. To that end the new Sport Classic pulls on design cues initialized by the beautiful 911 Targa 4S Heritage Design Edition that we covered in June of 2020, but where the open-top model’s gorgeous Cherry Metallic paintwork gave it a classier appearance, the new coupe’s Sport Grey Metallic paint, and painted contrasting stripes in light Sport Grey, have a more purposeful, performance-first look.

Both cars are from Porsche’s “Heritage Design” series, and both go a long way to pull on the heartstrings of mature Porschephiles that may have either owned a ‘60s- or ‘70s-era 911 in their earlier life, or more likely were the benefactors of a father or uncle that did. Many more merely saw similarly sporting 911s driving by on occasion, or drooled over centerfold spreads of those cars in glossy magazines like Motor Trend or Car and Driver. The new Sport Classic is now capable of fulfilling that once magical childhood dream, albeit with a level of performance never even contemplated back in such innocent days.

Unique styling upgrades join other design details that are purposefully missing

2023 Porsche 911 Sport Classic
The standard interior is even more retrospective than the exterior design.

Minus the painted centre stripes, which actually bisect a carbon-fibre hood that’s unique to Turbo models, as well as a special “double-bubble” roof panel, and less the decaled white lollipop (that can be numbered from 1 to 99 at no additional cost), plus the striped “PORSCHE” lettering down each rocker panel, which, like the lollipop, is a decal that can be removed by a customer/dealer if desired, the new Sport Classic is also reminiscent of the 911 Sport Classic that Porsche built for 2010, a particularly attractive design that won the hearts of enthusiasts a dozen years ago.

The Sport Classic should be noted for what it doesn’t include too. The wider rear wing from the Turbo/Turbo S’ is the most obvious, replaced by the stubbier ducktail spoiler noted earlier, the latter seeming as if it’s an extension of the more common car’s wing pedestal. The ovoid intakes normally found ahead of each rear fender flair aren’t included either, providing a cleaner, more classic look. These important cooling ducts are now integrated below the ducktail spoiler, just above two large circular tailpipes poking out the rear bumper, these replacing the Turbo/Turbo S’ quad of rectangular exhaust tips.

At least as complex, Porsche not only had to retool its 911 assembly line to create the rear quarter panels in order to remove the cooling vents, but the bottom edge of these panels is entirely different from the Turbo/Turbo S models too, as is this lower section on the front quarter panels (aft of the front wheels), the rocker panels and those on the rear quarters.

Standard Sport Classic interior adds 1970s flair

2023 Porsche 911 Sport Classic
Yes, that’s a 7-speed manual in a rear-wheel drive Turbo!

The Sport Classic continues its retrospective theme inside, where “Pepita” checkered fabric seat centres and door panels are joined by black and Classic Cognac semi-aniline leather (the latter also used in the fabulous 918 Spyder supercar), although those wanting a bit less of yesteryear can choose optional single-tone black leather (yawn). Leather also covers the sun visors, steering wheel rim and even the steering column, not to mention the air vent slats, while perforated Race-Tex fabric is used for the headliner plus the A-, B- and C-Pillars, aiding visual, tactile and auditory refinement.

Ahead of the driver, the mostly digital gauge cluster gets cool green-backlit dials, also from Porsche’s past, but the Porsche Communications Management (PCM) system is 100-percent modern in look and internal execution, which is a positive considering this car is meant more for high-speed cruising than racetrack activities.

Limited edition Sport Classic available in Canada

2023 Porsche 911 Sport Classic
PorscheDesign is offering a luxury timepiece to commemorate the limited edition 911 Sport Classic.

With only 1,250 units available worldwide, it might be difficult to get one’s hands on this limited edition 911. Still, it wouldn’t hurt to ask your local dealer, who just might have allocated an unspoken-for example (the markets have taken their toll in recent weeks, so you never know if someone cancelled).

And on that note, it was nice of Porsche to include North America for this iteration of its Heritage Design line, being that the aforementioned 911 Targa 4S Heritage Design Edition was not offered on this side of the Atlantic.

 

The new Porsche 911 Sport Classic (3:17):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

With electric-only mobility ranging from 30 to 50 kilometres, most plug-in hybrid buyers won’t be expecting to use their EV modes much, unless their commutes or errand runs are confined to short distances,…

Porsche Cayenne and Panamera PHEVs will soon get 80 km of EV range

2022 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid
Porsche’s impressive Cayenne and Panamera E-Hybrid models will get up to 80 km of all-electric range for 2024.

With electric-only mobility ranging from 30 to 50 kilometres, most plug-in hybrid buyers won’t be expecting to use their EV modes much, unless their commutes or errand runs are confined to short distances, but extending that range up to 80 km could make a PHEV viable for those with lengthier daily drives.

No doubt, Porsche is thinking along these lines with a recent announcement of up to 80 km of electric range for their future Cayenne and Panamera plug-in E-Hybrid models. When the new extended-range PHEVs arrive for 2024, they’ll offer one of the most competitive EV ranges in the industry, making these models ideal bridges to fully electric options, as they were always meant to be. Ideal for traveling long distances without the need to stop and wait while recharging, a long-range plug-in hybrid would provide a nice best-of-both-worlds alternative.

Future 911 hybrid to likely come with extended electric-only range too

2022 Porsche Taycan GTS
Porsche sold more than 42,000 Taycan EVs last year, making the new electric car profitable.

As mentioned in a previous Porsche news story, the quintessential sports car brand will soon offer a hybridized version of its legendary 911 model, which should benefit from similarly long EV capability.

The upcoming 911 hybrid, scheduled to arrive in 2025, actually pulls its electric tech from the Stuttgart, Germany-based brand’s motorsport division, as well as its 919 Hybrid supercar, giving it street and track cred that few sports car competitors could even hope to match, and that’s even before factoring in that it’s a 911, one of the most celebrated road and track cars ever created.

Porsche sees EV is profits due to 42,000 Taycans sold in 2021

2023 Porsche Macan T
A new Macan EV will arrive for 2024 (2023 Macan T shown).

Worldwide Taycan sales soared to 42,000 units in 2021, making the sporty four-door EV profitable according to Lutz Meschke, Porsche’s Chief Financial Officer. What’s more, Porsche’s Macan EV will arrive in just two years, so the brand is on track to attract an entirely new eco-focused clientele.

The Macan EV will utilize the same Porsche- and Audi-designed PPE architecture that underpins the Taycan and E-Tron GT, plus the upcoming 718 Cayman and Boxster EV sports cars that will be 100-percent electric by 2025 (check out our previous Porsche story). All new Porsche BEVs boast 800-volt fast-charging capability, making them as convenient as they’re clean and responsive.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

Like it or lump it, both 718 models’ horizontally opposed “lumps” are getting tossed when the two sports cars’ fifth generation debuts in three years. According to Porsche CEO Oliver Blume, the…

Fifth-generation Porsche 718 Cayman and 718 Boxster going completely electric

2022 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4
The next-generation 718 Boxster and Cayman will be 100-percent electric when they debut in 2025.

Like it or lump it, both 718 models’ horizontally opposed “lumps” are getting tossed when the two sports cars’ fifth generation debuts in three years.

According to Porsche CEO Oliver Blume, the mid-engine 718 Cayman coupe and 718 Boxster convertible, plus the Spyder if offered, will say goodbye to their flat-four and flat-six engines by 2025, replaced by fully electric power.

No announcements about powertrain specifics are available, but Porsche’s entry-level sports cars are being designed to keep their lightweight DNA intact, while plenty of lessons learned from building the all-electric Porsche Taycan, as well as the upcoming 2024 Macan EV (that we covered previously), should aid development of the two-place performance duet.

Tech from LMP1 Le Mans racer and 919 hypercar expected for 911 hybrid power unit

2022 Porsche 911 Cabriolet GTS
The 911 will keep its combustion powerplant lineup in 2025, but a hybrid will join the fray.

Additionally, Porsche’s 911 will continue forward with a lineup of internal combustion engines for the unforeseen future, but take note that its powertrain choices will expand to include a hybrid-electric option for 2025. Blume stated this electrified 911 will even source its tech from the brand’s multi-championship-winning motorsports division, with a nod to the LMP1 Le Mans race-spec power unit, which was also used in the phenomenal 919 hybrid supercar. Blume went further to suggest that a future 911 GT3 would receive a version of new hybrid powerplant.

Hybrids in mind, could F1 be in Porsche’s future? While we wouldn’t want to guess, Blume did tease that more surprises could be expected in the near future.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

Porsche Design, the quintessential sports car brand’s (and performance crossover maker’s) in-house design department, is celebrating 50 years in 2022, so it only makes sense they’d commemorate such…

Limited edition 911 Targa created to commemorate 50 years of Porsche Design

2022 Porsche 911 Edition 50Y Porsche Design
Porsche has made a special limited-edition 911 Targa 4 GTS, plus restored a 1972 911 Targa, to commemorate 50 years of Porsche Design.

Porsche Design, the quintessential sports car brand’s (and performance crossover maker’s) in-house design department, is celebrating 50 years in 2022, so it only makes sense they’d commemorate such an important occasion with a special version of the only model still made that was available back in 1972, the legendary 911.

The new 911 Edition 50Y Porsche Design, based on a 2022 911 Targa 4 GTS, features plenty of stylish upgrades along with a nice package of bundled features, including dark-silver and satin-black exterior accents on the Targa bar, a similar treatment on the centre-lock Turbo S wheels, and a set of “Porsche Design” badges, while four gloss-black painted brake calipers and a “50 Years” plaque atop the engine cover finish off the retro look.

Subtle details enhance posh interior

2022 Porsche 911 Edition 50Y Porsche Design
Both new and renewed 911s would enhance the look of any driveway.

Inside, a dash plaque commemorates the Porsche Design division’s 50th anniversary as well as each car’s placement in the 750-unit limited edition series, while the 911 Edition 50Y Porsche Design cabin also benefits from a special steering wheel badge, and the signature of Ferry Porsche’s son Ferdinand Alexander (the Porsche Design division’s creator), atop the centre console lid.

Of course, the 911 Edition 50Y Porsche Design model just wouldn’t be right without a set of embroidered or embossed headrests, with the latter getting the nod, while this handywork gets added to the model’s top-level 18-way Adaptive Sport Seats Plus, while Slate Grey seat belts can be found to either side. Additionally, Porsche’s much-lauded Sport Chrono Package comes as standard equipment, with a unique Porsche Design chronograph clock placed in the usual centre position on the dash-top.

Watchmaking has long been an important part of Porsche Design’s business

2022 Porsche 911 Edition 50Y Porsche Design
The new 2022 Porsche 911 Edition 50Y Porsche Design model features plenty of styling upgrades over regular 911 Targa 4 GTS models.

Important to understand, this unique chronograph clock face has more significance in this special edition Porsche Design model’s than it would in other 911s, because the in-house styling house has been designing timepieces from its onset. In fact, Porsche Design has now reissued its first wristwatch, the 1972 Chronograph 1, limiting it to a mere 500 units. To be clear, Porsche Design watches are respected much more than the quartz-powered pieces you might find in a dealership’s parts department. The original Porsche Design watch, powered by a Valjoux 7750 automatic chronograph (Valjoux is now owned by Swatch group’s ETA, while now defunct Orfina, once a highly respected Swiss watchmaker, produced watches for Porsche Design as well), was also the watch industry’s first fully black timepiece (other than some of its details), a feature, like the dials in a car’s gauge cluster, designed to minimize glare during racing.

2022 Porsche 911 Edition 50Y Porsche Design
Of course, the Sport Chrono Package comes standard, with a special Porsche Design dial, but take note the purchase also includes a Porsche Design mechanical watch.

At $7,700 USD, the new 1972 Chronograph 1 reissue is hardly inexpensive, although the price is not over-the-top for a high-quality mechanical chronograph with Porsche Design credentials, so it should sell out quickly, while a second Porsche Design chronograph, dubbed Porsche Design Chronograph 1 – 1972 Limited Edition, a more modern take on the original design, will be included with every 911 Edition 50Y Porsche Design purchase.

Each of the 750 timepieces feature an all-black design, like the 1972 Chronograph 1, with bright white used to make the sharply printed indices and sub-dial markers easy to read. Ditto for the white hour and minute hands, although Porsche Design has once again bowed to history by providing a bright red seconds hand and red lettering above the 6 o’clock position. No doubt, each 911 Edition 50Y Porsche Design buyer will cherish this unique timepiece, which will more than likely appreciate over time.

Porsche’s future is all about marrying the past to the present

1972 Porsche 911 Targa
It would be tough to choose which Porsche 911 we’d rather have, new or old?

Along with the special-edition Targa 4 GTS and two Porsche Design watches, Porsche Design chose to commemorate its 50-year celebration by commissioning a completely restored 1972 911 S 2.4 Targa, which can be seen in the photos. Turning to Porsche Classic, the brand’s in-house restoration division, made sure it would receive original and hand-made components, resulting in an almost completely new version of this 50-year-old example of rolling art and celebrated performance.

The fact both new and old Porsche’s share many of the same styling details is no coincidence either, but as much as you might want to put the two 911s in a garage side-by-side, you’ll only be able to see the classic on display at the Porsche Museum in Stuttgart, Germany, alongside one new 911 Edition 50Y Porsche Design, as well as the two Porsche Design watches.

New 911 Edition 50Y Porsche Design available now

The new model is available now, ahead of arriving in Canada this spring, for the tidy sum of $217,200, and while it may already be sold out, it probably wouldn’t hurt to contact your local Porsche retailer to make sure.

50 years of Porsche Design with a special edition 911 #Shorts (best viewed on phone or tablet):
https://www.youtube.com/shorts/qrReywyb3Yw

The 911 Edition 50 Years Porsche Design (1:00):

Porsche Design presents the Sport Chrono Collection (1:31):

Porsche Design Chronograph 911 GT3 with Touring Package (1:14):

The new 1919 Globetimer UTC from Porsche Design (1:48):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche Design