How do factory leasing and financing rates from zero percent sound to you? That’s what Nissan is offering in order to entice you into a new 2019 Versa Note. Yes, I know the Versa Note was recently discontinued,…

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV Road Test

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
Nissan’s Versa Note might be on its way out, but there are still plenty of new examples available and it remains a very good little car. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

How do factory leasing and financing rates from zero percent sound to you? That’s what Nissan is offering in order to entice you into a new 2019 Versa Note.

Yes, I know the Versa Note was recently discontinued, but that doesn’t mean it’s not a good car. In fact, Nissan’s second-smallest hatchback is a great little runabout that provides more interior room than most subcompact competitors. It’s just passed its best-before date, and is therefore being replaced by an all-new subcompact sedan for 2020.

If you haven’t seen the new four-door Versa yet (and you may not have as it’s only being offered in the U.S. so far), imagine a shrunken 2020 Sentra or a smaller version of the recent Altima crossed with Nissan’s newest Leaf. If you’re not sure what the Altima looks like, Nissan’s mid-size family car was recently redesigned to look like a smaller, less dramatic Maxima sedan, the latter being Nissan’s ultimately stylish flagship four-door (it really is a nice looking car), while the current second-generation Leaf was recently normalized in order to appeal to a larger audience (the first one was a bit whacky). All in all the new Versa sedan looks fresh and modern, and the outgoing Versa Note doesn’t.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
The Versa Note features a long wheelbase and tall roofline for impressive interior room. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

While not the latest, greatest Nissan on the block, this final Versa Note nevertheless incorporates most of the brand’s newest frontal design trends for much more attractive styling than the original version sold here, which was in fact the second-generation sold elsewhere. That car ended up replacing the even blander Versa sedan as well as the unorthodox (but brilliantly cool) Cube crossover, and actually did rather well on the sales charts when first arriving on the scene in late 2013.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
It’s lack of fog lamps are a clear sign this example is not a Special Edition, while its alloy wheels denote its SV designation. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

To be clear, the 12,297 Versas sold in 2013 and 13,314 delivered in 2014 were a combination of the Note hatchback and Versa sedan, the latter cancelled in Canada after the 2014 model year. Thus calendar year 2015 resulted in just 9,120 Versa Note unit sales, which by hindsight should have been celebrated as a banner 12 months being that Canadian sales slipped to 7,417 units the following year and only climbed up to 7,865 in 2017, before dropping all the way down to 5,385 examples in 2018 and only 2,369 last year.

Despite losing favour with the buying public as the years continued, which was partially due to the extremely well received Micra city car that arrived in 2014, and also because of Canadian consumers’ continued purge of cars for crossover SUVs (Nissan currently leading the market’s small SUV charge with its popular Kicks and Qashqai subcompacts and Rogue compact), the Versa Note is a well-designed four-door hatchback that delivers big in space and comfort.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
The Versa Note is a back to basics car, but it’s still very comfortable. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The Note offers loftier occupants an incredible amount of headroom thanks to a tall overall design that makes it feel more like a subcompact SUV or a mini-minivan than an economy car. The seats are especially comfortable too, thanks to memory foam that really cushions and supports the backside, and the upholstery is attractive as well, with a nice blue fleck on black cloth. The driver even gets a folding armrest attached to the right-side bolster for added comfort.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
Although the design looks dated compared to Nissan’s newer offerings, the Versa’s cabin is well organized and reasonably well equipped. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Other nice details include a leather-wrapped steering wheel with tilt function, and some attractive satin-silver detailing on its spokes. The silver treatment circles around each HVAC vent too, plus it adorns the centre stack and surrounds the shift lever. What’s more, the gauge cluster is particularly impressive, with backlit dials and some great looking digital displays. In fact, it’s so nice that it makes the infotainment touchscreen seem dated by comparison. The truth is that the centre display does look a bit behind graphically, especially when compared to interfaces in Nissan’s newer more recently updated models, but it’s nevertheless plenty functional and easy to use, plus at 7.0 inches in diameter it’s quite large, which works well for the backup camera.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
This upgraded gauge cluster is a real treat for this class. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Due to the lack of telescopic steering, the Versa may not fit your body type ideally however, my long legs and short torso necessitating a seat position that was closer to the pedals than I would’ve liked, causing me to compromise with a more upright backrest than normal. I managed to get reasonably comfortable after spending some time setting it up, after which it also provided an adequate driving position for decent control.

On the positive, the rear seating area is spacious with more legroom than average for this class (Natural Resources Canada actually classifies the Versa Note as a mid-size car), so like I mentioned a moment ago, this little car (with a long wheelbase) is perfect for large people on a budget. A flip-down rear centre armrest gets filled with dual cupholders, plus there are two cupholders on the backside of the front console that are easy to access for rear passengers, while a magazine holder gets added to the backside of the front passenger’s seat.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
The infotainment interface is fairly old school in design, but very functional. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The Versa Note is good for those that haul a lot of cargo as well. It includes 60/40 split-folding rear seatbacks, which is normal in this class, but unusually welcome is the fancy Divide-N-Hide adjustable cargo floor that moves up and down as needed. It’s good for stowing tall cargo when left at the bottom, or when lifted allows for a totally flat loading area once the seats are lowered. The Note’s dedicated cargo volume measures 532 litres (18.8 cubic feet) behind the rear seats, while laying the seatbacks flat results in a really generous 1,084 litres (38.3 cu ft) of maximum space.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
The large 7.0-inch display provides a good view from the backup camera. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

All of that spacious interior volume comes well stocked with features, but of course its content will depend on which trim you choose. Take note, Nissan dropped the model’s sportiest SR trim for 2019 and its most luxurious SL trim for 2018, but they introduced the $700 SV Special Edition package for the model’s final incarnation, which adds fog lamps, a rear rooftop spoiler and Special Edition badging to the exterior, plus proximity-sensing keyless access to get you inside and a pushbutton ignition system to turn on the engine, while the cabin includes upgraded NissanConnect infotainment with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto as well as SiriusXM satellite radio.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
The HVAC interface is fairly rudimentary, but it all works well. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

One glance at my tester’s lack of fog lamps and it’s easy to see that it’s not an SV Special Edition, but instead its 15-inch alloy wheels make its regular $18,398 SV designation clear (the base Note S comes with wheel covers over 15-inch steel rims). The SV also adds the impressive instrument cluster and leather-wrapped steering wheel I mentioned earlier, plus power door locks with remote keyless entry, powered windows, a continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT) as standard equipment, cruise control, a six-way manual driver’s seat (that now includes height adjustment), heatable front seats, a cargo cover, and more.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
SV trim comes standard with a more efficient CVT automatic. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The $14,698 base S model is the only trim available with a five-speed manual transmission for 2019 (it came standard in the SV as well for 2018), but the CVT can be had for $1,300 more. No matter the transmission, the base model also includes power-adjustable heated side mirrors, a four-way manual driver’s seat, air conditioning, the aforementioned 7.0-inch infotainment touchscreen, Bluetooth hands-free phone connectivity with audio streaming, audio and phone switches on the steering wheel spokes, a hands-free text messaging assistant, Siri Eyes Free, aux and USB inputs on the lower console, a four-speaker audio system, and more.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
Two-way heated front seats make the winters more bearable. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Of course, all the expected active and passive safety features are included too, but if you want the latest advanced driver assistive systems such as collision warning with automatic emergency braking, blind spot monitoring with lane departure warning, or dynamic cruise control with Nissan’s semi-autonomous ProPILOT assist self-driving technology, it’s best to look toward one of the newer SUVs in the Japanese brand’s lineup.

The Versa Note is more traditional than those trendier utilities, and in this respect it does everything that most practical consumers need. It’s not quite as fancy or edgy as the newer Nissans, yet along with its comfortable seats, and thanks in part to its aforementioned long wheelbase it provides an extremely nice ride for its subcompact price, plus adequate performance off the line or when passing, while its CVT is very smooth if not particularly sporty.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
The front seats are very comfortable, but the driver’s position isn’t ideal for those with longer legs than torso and arms. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The same 1.6-litre inline four-cylinder found in the tiny Micra puts out an identical 109 horsepower and 107 lb-ft of torque in the Note, which means the larger, heavier car doesn’t feel as enthusiastic when going about its business. Of course, the focus is more on fuel-efficiency in this class, and to that end the Versa gets a Transport Canada five-cycle fuel economy rating of 8.6 L/100km in the city, 6.6 on the highway and 7.7 combined with the manual, or 7.6 city, 6.2 highway and 7.0 combined with the CVT, which doesn’t sound all that good until comparing it to the just-mentioned Micra that when fully loaded has an identical 1,092-kilo curb weight as the base Versa Note’s starting point (the as-tested Note SV weighs in at 1,124 kg), yet nevertheless manages just 7.9 combined with its manual and 8.0 combined with its less advanced four-speed auto. A better comparison is the similarly roomy Honda Fit that’s good for 7.0 L/100km combined with its six-speed manual or just 6.5 with its most efficient CVT.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
The rear seating area is very spacious, and actually rated as a mid-size car. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The Note is a tall hatchback as mentioned, so its high centre-of-gravity works against performance when pushing hard through the corners, but if you don’t mind a little body lean when trying to make up time, it manages fast-paced curves reasonably well. This said, if you’re looking for a sportier runabout and don’t mind slightly less room, the considerably less expensive Micra that I mentioned a moment ago is a very good bet. The Versa Note, on the other hand, is designed more for comfort than speed, and therefore does a great job of shuttling one to five adults around town with ease, and would likely make a decent road trip companion as well.

2019 Nissan Versa Note SV
The Versa delivers a lot of cargo space for the subcompact class. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

If you’d like to take advantage of the zero-percent financing noted earlier in this review, and think this little Nissan might suit your lifestyle and budget, I’d recommend checking out CarCostCanada’s 2019 Nissan Versa Note Canada Prices page where you can go over all trims and packages in detail, not to mention quickly scan the available colours within each trim, while also learning about the latest manufacturer rebates that could save you even more.

Best of all, however, is a CarCostCanada membership that provides access to dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands upon purchase. All of the above is available online at CarCostCanada’s website or via a new CarCostCanada app downloadable for free from your phone’s app store. So before you call your local Nissan retailer or connect with them online (it’s probably a good idea to deal with them remotely during this time of crisis) make sure you’ve first done your homework at CarCostCanada, so you can get the best deal possible on your new Versa Note.

Don’t let looks deceive you. Even though the Qashqai’s design has remained exactly the same throughout its first three model years, especially when seen in its official launch colour of Monarch Orange,…

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum Road Test

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
The 2019 Nissan Qashqai looks great in Monarch Orange, the original launch colour for the 2017 model. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

Don’t let looks deceive you. Even though the Qashqai’s design has remained exactly the same throughout its first three model years, especially when seen in its official launch colour of Monarch Orange, this 2019 model received plenty of important new upgrades. 

The list of improvements starts with advanced driver assistive systems such as Intelligent Emergency Braking (IEB), Blind Spot Warning (BSW), Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA), and Nissan’s smart Rear Door Alert (RDA) system, that latter reminding if something or someone has been left in the back seat, while other additions include a new standard NissanConnect infotainment touchscreen that grows to 7.0 inches across the line, and boasts standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration, satellite radio, live navigation, plus mobile apps and services. The latest entry-level Qashqai also features a second USB port within the centre console, plus Nissan’s convenient Divide-N-Hide cargo system in back. If that news isn’t good enough, take note that Nissan managed to add all of this content while only increasing the price by $200, to $20,198. 

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
Designed mostly for pavement, the Qashqai is quite capable of light-duty off-roading, even in its fanciest SL Platinum trim. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

That increase in price isn’t responsible for the Qashqai no longer being the most affordable subcompact SUV in Canada, however, the blame for that clearly laid on Nissan’s own $18,298 Kicks. Now the Japanese automaker has more small utilities in its lineup than any mainstream rival, all three of which are amongst their segments’ top sellers. 

The Qashqai’s low base price doesn’t mean that it comes up short on features either, its standard menu filled with goodies like projector headlights, LED daytime running lamps, heatable powered door mirrors with LED turn signals, powered windows and door locks, the latter connected to a switchblade-style remote, an electronic parking brake (which strangely reverts to a foot-actuated type on S CVT and SV CVT trims), a tilt and telescopic steering column, a colour TFT multi-information display (MID), variable intermittent wipers, sun visors with extensions and vanity mirrors, sunglasses storage in the overhead console, micro-filtered air conditioning, a backup camera that’s now easier to view due to the bigger infotainment display, Bluetooth phone connectivity with streaming audio, text message reading and responding capability, Siri Eyes Free, a four-speaker AM/FM/CD/MP3/WMA audio system with illuminated steering wheel buttons, speed-sensitive volume, Radio Data System (RDS), two-way Quick Comfort heatable front seats (that truly heat up quickly), a rear-seat centre armrest, a cargo cover, six cargo tie-down hooks, tire pressure monitoring with Easy Fill Tire Alert, all the usual passive and active safety and security features, and more. 

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
The SL Platinum package adds these stylish LED headlamps. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

Just like before, the Qashqai continues into 2019 with three trim lines, including the previously noted entry-level S model, plus the SV and SL, the former two offering optional AWD and the latter making it standard. That top-tier trim is how my test model was dressed up, replete with an even more upscale Platinum package, but before I unwrap all this upgrade entails I should point out that the $26,198 SV might be an even better option for those not willing the pay for the premium-like features in my SL. 

The SV boasts sharp looking 17-inch alloy wheels, these replacing the base set of 16-inch steel rims with covers, plus automatic headlamps, fog lights, remote start, proximity keyless entry, pushbutton start/stop, auto high beams, rear parking sonar, illumination added to the vanity mirrors, a powered glass sunroof, a heated leather-wrapped steering wheel, a leather-clad shifter knob, cruise control, two additional stereo speakers, two-zone auto HVAC, rear passenger ventilation, and more, while a host of new advanced safety features are included too, like enhanced autonomous Intelligent Emergency Braking with Pedestrian Detection, Lane Departure Warning (LDW) with Intelligent Lane Intervention, and Rear Intelligent Braking (R-IEB). 

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
SL trim includes these sporty machine-finished 19-inch alloys with black painted pockets. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

The top-tier SL model I was testing starts at $31,398, but even for this reasonable sum it looks and feels like a small luxury utility due to big standard 19-inch alloys, roof rails, the electronic parking brake once again (this is the only trim that combines it with the CVT), an Intelligent Around View Monitor, navigation, voice recognition, SiriusXM Traffic and Travel Link, leather upholstery, an eight-way powered driver’s seat with two-way lumbar, and a front driver’s seatback pocket, while new to the SL’s standard features list is Intelligent Cruise Control (ICC), Moving Object Detection (MOD) to improve the R-IEB, and the ProPilot Assist semi-automated self-driving system that helps to maintain a given lane while easing highway driving stress. 

As I noted earlier, my test model also included the $2,000 SL Platinum package that provides LED headlamps for seeing much farther down the road at night, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a Homelink universal remote, wonderful sounding nine-speaker Bose audio, and NissanConnect Services, the latter a bundle filled up with mobile apps designed to enhance everyday life with your Qashqai. 

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
The Qashqai is roomy and well finished for its paltry price, especially in top-line SL Platinum trim. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

Of note, all the 2019 Qashqai prices mentioned in this review, including trims, packages and individual options, were sourced from CarCostCanada, where you can also find rebate information and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands of dollars when purchasing a new vehicle. 

Together with the full load of features the Qashqai provides in each trim, the cabin is surprisingly upscale. Last year I tested a base S model, and was impressed with its refinement for only $20k, but this SL Platinum is much fancier. The dash top is soft to the touch and the front door uppers are formed from a nice padded composite, these being common surface treatments no matter the trim chosen, but as mentioned earlier the attractive perforated leather upholstery with contrast stitching can’t be had outside of this SL. Such is the case for the leatherette-wrapped padding with contrast stitching found on the lower centre console, that also serves to protect you and your front passenger’s inside knees from rubbing up against what would otherwise be a harder plastic surface, and it’s great looking too. 

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
The well organized, nicely made cabin provides a lot of high-end goodies in SL Platinum trim. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

Some additional SL highlights include piano black lacquered inlays on the instrument panel, the centre stack, around the shift lever, and each door panel front to back, while this was accented nicely by a narrow strip of satin-silver metal-look trim. Nissan adds more satin-silver detailing on the steering wheel spokes and the shifter, before splashing chrome throughout the rest of the interior to bring a bit of sparkle to key components. 

Sitting in the driver’s seat, the leather-covered steering wheel feels good in the hands, while the similarly clad shift knob connects through to Nissan’s Xtronic CVT (continuously variable transmission), which joins up to an energetic 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine capable of 141 horsepower and 147 lb-ft of torque. The CVT will probably be the choice of most Qashqai buyers, but I tested the six-speed manual last year and was happily surprised. It’s a sporty feeling manual that provides plenty of go-fast performance, whereas the CVT tested here is best for cruising at more relaxed speeds, the Qashqai SL pretty good at smoothing out road wrinkles, quieting outside commotions, and comforting all aboard. 

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
The colour TFT multi-information display comes standard across the Qashqai line. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

CVTs are often criticized for lacking any sort of sporting capability, but after testing three Qashqais with this automated gearbox, and a whole host of additional Nissan models with variations on this CVT’s theme, I found it ideally suited to SUV life. Of course, it hardly provides the kind of get-up-and-go as the manual, in fact buzzing annoyingly when getting hard on the throttle thanks to any CVT’s natural inclination to hold higher than required revs for longer than needed, but fortunately the shift lever’s manual mode is even better for relieving performance than adding it. Shifting up at such moments provides instant relief from the high-revving engine (which can get a bit noisy when left for too long at high revs), dropping the revs and bringing peace and quiet. The process eventually occurs all on its own, but why would anyone want to wait? At regular daily speeds the transmission was best left in Drive, at which point it delivers smooth, capable performance. 

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
This 7-inch touchscreen is now standard in all Qashqai trims, and can even be kitted out with an overhead parking camera. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

This said the Qashqai moves along quickly enough without the need to force it hard, while its ride quality is good for the small SUV segment due to a long wheelbase that’s based on a version of the same chassis architecture and fully independent suspension as the larger Rogue SUV, which incorporates struts up front and a multi-link setup in the rear, plus stabilizer bars at both ends. This means, even with my tester’s larger 225/45R19 all-season tires, the Qashqai ideally balances all the firmness required for its impressive road holding with plenty of comfort. Additionally, its four-wheel disc brakes bring speed to a standstill plenty fast, aided by Intelligent Engine Braking that becomes standard with SV and SL trims. 

On top of this, the Qashqai is a miser on fuel, with an estimated five-cycle rating of 10.0 L/100km in the city, 8.1 on the highway and 9.2 combined when FWD is mated up to the manual gearbox; 8.6 city, 7.2 highway and 8.0 combined with FWD and the CVT; or 9.1, 7.6 and 8.4 with the CVT and AWD. With today’s ever-increasing pump prices, the Qashqai can certainly be a relief to the budget. 

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
Great looking leather-appointed front seats are very comfortable and supportive. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

Of course it may be a bit less efficient when filled up with people and gear, and trust me the Qashqai can hold a lot of both. With respect to the latter, the little ute can stow 648 litres (22.9 cubic feet) of cargo behind its back seats when they’re upright, which is extremely good for this segment, while those standard 60/40 split-folding seatbacks open up a maximum of 1,730 litres (61.1 cubic feet) of gear-toting space when laid flat, and that’s about as good as it gets in this class. 

Regarding passenger space and overall comfort, the front seats are nicely sculpted, cupping the backside perfectly, while I found the driver’s seating position excellent for my five-foot-eight frame, providing all the adjustability I needed thanks to being complemented by a tilt and telescoping steering wheel that I was able to pull close enough for ideal comfort and control, this not always the case due to my long-legged, shorter torso body type. 

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
The rear seating area is roomy and comfy. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

I would’ve appreciated more seat heater comfort, however, as the setup provided just one “HI” and one “LO” setting, which sometimes made it too hot or not warm enough, reason enough for three-way systems being the industry norm. Still, it’s difficult to criticize too harshly in this price-sensitive segment, especially when the Qashqai does everything else so well. 

This said you won’t find any such cushion warmers in the back, but those rear outboard seats are nevertheless very comfortable and capable of holding big teens and adults. As per normal, I positioned the driver’s seat as I would when behind the wheel and sat in the back seat, which left approximately five inches in front of my knees, as well as another four inches above my head, or enough space for a six-foot-plus passenger. There’s more than ample width too, best when two are aboard, but possible for three, while my shoulder and hips had about three to four inches left next to the door. 

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
Cargo space is very generous for the class. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

The rear seating area isn’t quite as nicely appointed as that up front, particularly where soft-touch door uppers would otherwise be found, but the door panel armrests are well padded with stitched leatherette covers, and the folding centre armrest is comfortable while its dual cupholders are practical. Nissan also adds a twin set of air vents to the backside of the front console, helpful when wanting to the keep the windows closed. 

Spacious for most families, empty-nesters or active lifestyle couples including their gear, the Qashqai is a well-made, generously outfitted, and an enjoyable SUV to drive, delivering a lot more than its reasonable price promises, plus it continues paying dividends long after the honeymoon period is over, due to superb fuel-efficiency. No wonder the Qashqai sells better than most of its subcompact peers, all of which are reasons enough to recommend it highly.

Ask most Canadians to name an electric car and Toyota’s Prius will more often than not get the credit, but the true global EV leader is Nissan’s Leaf.  The Prius isn’t actually an electric vehicle,…

Nissan Canada drops two regular Leaf trims and prices 2019 Leaf Plus

2019 Nissan Leaf Plus
The 2019 Nissan Leaf Plus arrives with an entry price of $43,998 plus 13-percent quicker acceleration and 50-percent more range. (Photo: Nissan)

Ask most Canadians to name an electric car and Toyota’s Prius will more often than not get the credit, but the true global EV leader is Nissan’s Leaf. 

The Prius isn’t actually an electric vehicle, but rather a hybrid that still relies on a gasoline-powered internal combustion engine to get it from point A to B, while using its battery and electric motor for very low-speed (less than 20 km/h), short-distance travel (parking lots) as well as supplemental power to reduce fuel consumption and therefore improve emissions. Toyota now produces a plug-in hybrid dubbed Prius Prime that allows longer EV-mode distances at higher speeds, but its consumer take-rate has been very modest, while the automaker has no full EV available in our market. 

2019 Nissan Leaf Plus
The upgraded Leaf Plus charges more for a different kind of performance, which should work well for EV fans. (Photo: Nissan)

The Nissan Leaf, on the other hand, is 100-percent electric, relying solely on its battery and electric motor for propulsion, and therefore requiring regular refills from home and/or public charging stations, instead of the local gas station like the Prius. Where the Prius has long been the world’s best-selling hybrid, the Leaf is similarly dominant when it comes to electric vehicles, having delivered more than 390,000 units since it arrived on the market in 2010. 

Wanting to make sure it holds onto that leadership title, Canadians can now purchase the 2019 Leaf with its regular battery as well as with a more potent powertrain featuring stronger acceleration and greater range. The regular Leaf will continue to use a 40-kWh battery and 110-kW (147-horsepower) electric motor resulting in 243 kilometres of estimated driving distance per complete charge, and will also remain the model’s value leader at $40,698. The new Leaf Plus, however, will house a 62-kWh battery within its floorboards, connecting through to a 160 kW (214 hp) electric motor for an estimated 363 km of range, starting at $43,998. 

2019 Nissan Leaf Plus
The Leaf Plus, shown in top-line SL trim, features a reworked front fascia and other upgrades. (Photo: Nissan)

“With the addition of LEAF PLUS, the Nissan LEAF is now available with two battery options and a choice of four trim levels – each featuring the many advanced technologies offered under the banner of Nissan Intelligent Mobility,” said Steve Rhind, director of marketing, Nissan Canada Inc. 

To clarify, the 2019 Leaf is available in four trims as of April, including the just noted $40,698 Leaf SV, the $43,998 Leaf S Plus, the $46,598 Leaf SV Plus, and finally the $49,498 Leaf SL Plus, along with a $1,950 freight charge added across the line. 

2019 Nissan Leaf Plus
Of course, special badging tells all you’re driving the more desirable “PLUS” model. (Photo: Nissan)

This means the regular Leaf S that was available as a 2019 model mid-way through last year and earlier this year for just $36,798 ($3,900 less than the new base model), and the regular Leaf SL that added features like leather upholstery (actually two-tone black and grey perforated leather and microfibre-like Bio Suede PET cloth), an Intelligent Around View Monitor, Driver Attention Alert, seven-speaker Bose premium audio, turn signal repeaters integrated within the side mirror caps, and more for just $42,698, will no longer be available for order in Canada (they’re still offered in the U.S.), although you may still be able to find them at your local dealer. 

An upcharge of $5,900 for more power and approximately 120 km (or about 50-percent) more range might seem like a steep ask for what is basically the same car in mid-range Leaf SV trim, but it’s important to note the non-powertrain/charging system differences between the regular base Leaf and Leaf Plus trims. 

2019 Nissan Leaf Plus
The Leaf Plus, shown in top-tier SL trim, features a larger 8.0-inch touchscreen as standard equipment. (Photo: Nissan)

For instance, buyers opting for the new Leaf S Plus receive a modified front fascia design integrating unique blue highlights, an “e+” logo plate on the underside of the charge port lid, and new rear badges depending on trim level, while additional standard upgrades include Intelligent Forward Collision Warning (I-FCW), Rear Door Alert (that reminds if something or someone has been left in the back seat when arriving at your destination), and a one-inch larger centre touchscreen measuring 8.0 inches diagonally (the base 5.0-inch display is no longer available). 

2019 Nissan Leaf Plus
The new larger touchscreen includes standard Apple CarPlay (shown), Android Auto, navigation, and more. (Photo: Nissan)

It should also be noted that both regular Leaf SV and Leaf S Plus models now fill their infotainment systems with standard navigation, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, satellite radio, and more, but only SV trims offer voice recognition, NissanConnect EV (for remotely connecting via your smartphone), two more audio speakers for a total of six, and more. 

Also notable, the $3,300 less expensive Leaf SV adds 17-inch alloy wheels compared to 16-inch alloys with the Leaf S Plus, as well as fog lamps, an electromechanical parking brake (instead of a foot-operated one), an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a Homelink universal remote, an eight-way powered driver’s seat with two-way power lumbar support, a cargo cover, and a host of advanced driver assistive systems such as Automatic Emergency Braking (AEB) with pedestrian detection (which inherently includes the SV Plus model’s Intelligent Forward Collision Warning), High Beam Assist, Intelligent Cruise Control with Full Speed Range and Hold, ProPILOT Assist semi-autonomous self-driving, Steering Assist, Blind Spot Warning, Intelligent Lane Intervention, Rear Cross Traffic Alert, and more. 

2019 Nissan Leaf Plus
Despite the larger battery, the new Leaf Plus doesn’t give up any interior space for passengers or cargo. (Photo: Nissan)

The list of features just noted is also standard with the new Leaf SV Plus, while a shortlist of luxury items covered earlier in this story, when mentioning the now outgoing Leaf SL, also gets pulled up to new Leaf SL Plus trim, albeit with a sizeable price difference of $6,800 due to its performance and range improvements. 

This is a good time to explain that many EV owners look at range performance in a similar light to how traditional car buyers might be willing to pay more for quicker straight-line acceleration and better at-the-limit handling. Either way, the new Leaf Plus is “ensuring that there’s a Nissan LEAF to meet the driving needs of a wider range of customers,” stated a press release. 

2019 Nissan Leaf Plus
This convenient electromechanical parking brake is now standard on the base Leaf SV and optional with the new Leaf Plus S. (Photo: Nissan)

With respect to those more traditional performance conventions, despite hitting the scales at 1,737 kilos (3,831 lbs) instead of 1,580 kg (3,483 lbs), the new Leaf Plus is 13 percent quicker off the line than the regular Leaf, which Nissan says will allow its drivers to “confidently pass slower-moving vehicles, exit corners faster and more seamlessly, and merge easily with fast-moving traffic.” What’s more, the Leaf Plus’ top speed is 10 percent higher, which Nissan says is beneficial “for comfortable cruising.”

Many will find its faster charging capability an even better reason to ante up for the Leaf Plus. It comes with a new standard 100kW-capacity quick charging system that allows more efficient charging of up to 80-percent in only 45 minutes (according to the Nissan Canada’s retail website). If you can only find a 75-kW DC quick charger it will take just 5 minutes longer (50 minutes) to reach that 80-percent total, or an hour with a 50-kW DC quick charger (the regular Leaf needs about 40 minutes for an 80-percent charge with the same 50-kW DC quick charger, but can’t hook up to either 75-kW or 100-kW DC faster chargers). 

2019 Nissan Leaf Plus
The new Leaf Plus comes standard with a 100kW-capacity quick charging system that dramatically reduced the time it takes to recharge. (Photo: Nissan)

Lastly, a regular 240-volt home charging station will completely fill the new Leaf Plus’ battery after approximately 11.5 hours, which is only 3.5 hours more than the regular Leaf requires, and take note the Leaf Plus can also receive an extra 35 km of range after about 60 minutes of being plugged into this less potent charging station. 

Utilizing resources in mind, both Nissan EVs are incredibly efficient, with their energy equivalent ratings measuring 1.9 Le/100km in the city and 2.4 on the highway for the regular Leaf, or 2.1 Le/100km city and 2.5 highway for the Leaf Plus. Of course, litres of gasoline never enter the picture, but the Le/100km rating can be used as a guide to help those new to electric vehicles understand how their energy consumption more directly compares with an equivalent gasoline-powered vehicle, and how the energy use of EVs compare to each other.

2019 Nissan Leaf Plus
Whether or not the new Leaf Plus will keep Nissan ahead of the barrage of new and upcoming EVs is anyone’s guess, but variety certainly can’t hurt in this burgeoning market. (Photo: Nissan)

Also important, the more capable Leaf Plus battery doesn’t impact interior passenger or cargo volume one iota, with front and rear seating still generous in all dimensions, and the rear cargo area capable of swallowing up a sizeable 668 litres (23.6 cubic feet) with its 60/40-split rear seatbacks upright, and 849 litres (30.0 cubic feet) when they’re folded flat. 

If saving a few thousand is more important to you and your budget than increasing performance and range, or alternatively purchasing a more luxurious Leaf SL for considerably less money, make sure to contact your local Nissan dealer as they may have regular 2019 Leaf S and SL stock still available. Then again, if the charging benefits, extended range and added performance of the new Leaf Plus appeal more, these new models are now starting to arrive at said retailers across Canada. 

To learn more about all 2019 Nissan Leaf and Leaf Plus trims, packages and standalone options, including pricing on each, plus find out about available rebates and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands, make sure to check out CarCostCanada.

It’s déjà vu all over again, or at least that’s how I felt when picking up my 2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum AWD tester. I’d spent a week with an identical model less than a year prior; even down…

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD Road Test

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
The 2019 Rogue SL Platinum looks just like the 2018 Rogue SL Platinum, but Nissan has made some key features more affordable. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

It’s déjà vu all over again, or at least that’s how I felt when picking up my 2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum AWD tester. I’d spent a week with an identical model less than a year prior; even down to its top-line trim level and most popular Pearl White paint. 

Then I got inside, however, and was reminded of a near identical model I test drove the year prior in lovely Scarlet Ember livery, and therefore also remembered that last year’s SL Platinum wasn’t fully loaded, missing this SUV’s $500 SL Platinum Reserve Interior Package that includes a stylish stitched leatherette dash pad and replaces the regular Charcoal black or Almond beige leather upholstery with special quilted leather in an even richer looking Premium Tan hue, which comes across more like caramel or saddle brown. Either way it looks great, and ideally complements the white exterior paint, although the upgrade package is no longer available with the special metallic red exterior paint, or for that matter Nissan’s beautiful Caspian Blue. A shame. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
The Rogue’s rear design remains attractive, while SL Platinum trim’s 19-inch alloys enhance the look. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Not to start this review out on a negative, because there’s very little to fault this popular compact crossover SUV on. As noted, the Rogue is Nissan Canada’s most popular model, and one look should make it easy to understand why. It was refreshed for the 2017 model year with Nissan’s wider, more U-shaped Vmotion 2.0 grille that I happen to like a lot more than the original V, while its then-new quad-beam headlamps with LED daytime running lights, and its updated LED brake lights added premium-level sophistication to the design. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
Some of the Rogue SL Platinum’s key elements, including LED headlamps, fog lights and 19-inch alloys, make a big difference to its outward appearance. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

That face-lifted 2017 model included additional styling tweaks on the outside plus updates within, a personal favourite being its flat-bottom steering wheel that still makes a sporty statement in the otherwise elegantly appointed top-line 2019 Rogue SL Platinum Reserve model. So equipped, that steering wheel is leather-wrapped with a heatable rim, a much appreciated mid-winter feature, as are the Quick Comfort heated front seats that come standard across the entire Rogue line, albeit the Platinum’s perforated leather upholstery is exclusive to this model. 

There’s actually more to the SL Platinum Reserve Interior’s seat design than quilting and the caramel colour change. The quilting is only used for the centre inserts, with perforated leather added to the inner bolsters and contrast-stitched black leather on top of those bolsters for a little more of a sport look mixed in with the luxury. The seats’ upholstery is complemented by the same Premium Tan on the door armrests, centre armrest, padded knee protectors on each side of the lower centre console, and even the aforementioned dash facing, which incorporates a similarly classy looking stitched leatherette pad ahead of the front passenger. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
The $500 SL Platinum Reserve Interior Package includes this classy looking Premium Tan interior motif. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Icing on the proverbial cake comes in the form of Piano Black interior door inlays surrounding the usual chromed door handles, which match up nicely next to the same glossy black treatment rimming the dash vents, centre console, gear lever surround and otherwise leather-wrapped shift knob. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
The Rogue SL Platinum’s nicely sorted cockpit includes a heatable leather-wrapped flat-bottom steering wheel. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

As you may have guessed, the latest Rogue SL Platinum Reserve doesn’t just look like a premium crossover SUV, but in addition its standard feature set is replete with top-drawer gear that one-ups plenty of luxury brands. For instance, the official name given to this trim level is Rogue SL Platinum with ProPilot Assist, the latter technology standard with all SL Platinum models and really quite impressive. It’s a semi-autonomous “hands-on-wheel” driving system, which means it has the ability to completely drive itself, but due to safety concerns only lets you remove your hands from the steering wheel for about eight seconds at a time—it warns you to put your hands back on the wheel after that. Still, it’ll impress your friends and might be useful to those who find highway driving intimidating, as it helps keep the Rogue centered within its lane and, along with its Lane Departure Warning (LDW) and Intelligent Lane Intervention systems, may even help avoid an accident. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
A traditional analogue gauge cluster includes a colour TFT multi-info display at centre. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

These latter two advanced driver assistance systems get pulled up to the SL Platinum from mid-range SV trim, as does Intelligent emergency braking with pedestrian detection, and adaptive cruise control, while high beam assist, rear parking sensors, Moving Object Detection (MOD), backup collision intervention and rear autonomous emergency braking join ProPilot Assist as options with the SV and standard equipment with the top-line SL Platinum model. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
The centre touchscreen is filled with plenty of noteworthy features, but the dual-screen Around View parking monitor is the highlight. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Along with all the usual active and passive safety features, some advanced tech incorporated into upper trims from the base Rogue S include Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) with a display showing individual tire pressures and an Easy-Fill Tire Alert, Intelligent Forward Collision Warning (FCW), Intelligent Emergency Braking (IEB), plus two features normally relegated to top-line trims, Blind Spot Warning (BSW) with Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA), while Rear Door Alert is an oddly named albeit very welcome feature that actually warns against leaving something or someone in the back seat unattended after turning off the engine, by remembering that you opened a rear door before setting off on your drive. Now that’s smart. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
The unique saddle/caramel coloured leather upholstery looks rich, and the seats provide good comfort and support. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

As cool as some of this tech is, especially watching the Rogue drive itself, applying hands to said wheel while on the highway, and then winding through some twisting backroads after tooling through town is my usual course of action. As always the Rogue didn’t disappoint, but let me insert a caveat here, I’ve never set my performance expectations too high. This is an SUV built primarily for comfort rather than all-out speed, and to that end it delivers in spades, with a nice compliant ride, smooth, progressive acceleration, and an easy, controlled demeanor on the open freeway. It can manage curves too, and provides strong braking when needed, but if you’re looking for performance there are sportier SUVs in this class, yet few are smoother than the Rogue, such refinement its specialty. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
A large powered panoramic sunroof adds an open, airy ambience to an already spacious interior. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Behind that V-motion grille is the Nissan’s dependable 2.5-litre four-cylinder engine, which continues to make a totally acceptable if not breathtaking 170 horsepower and 175 lb-ft of torque, while its standard continuously variable transmission (CVT) is one of the reasons behind that just noted smooth factor. It’s also partially responsible for the Rogue’s commendable Transport Canada fuel economy rating that comes in at 9.6 L/100km in the city, 7.5 on the highway and 8.7 combined with its as-tested all-wheel drivetrain, or 9.1 city, 7.1 highway and 8.2 combined when opting for front-wheel drive. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
The rear seating area is very accommodating. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

As is mostly the case in this class, all-wheel drive is more about tackling slippery pavement than anything off-road, although traveling to campsites over logging roads or light-duty trails can benefit from AWD, as well as its various electronic all-weather features, such as Vehicle Dynamic Control (VDC) with Traction Control System (TCS). This said others in the class are starting to broaden their appeal, with the latest RAV4 Trail featuring some real 4×4-like go-anywhere technologies, and the Subaru Forester long offering its X-Mode for extracting itself from rougher situations. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
Nissan provides handy storage for the retractable cargo cover under the load floor. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Back to earth, or rather asphalt, the Rogue is ideal for slogging through Canadian winters, hitting the slopes, or alternatively heading out on that summer camping vacation. It can tow a small camp trailer or lightweight boat weighing up to 500 kilos (1,100 lbs), plus it can carry plenty of gear in back, up to 1,112 litres (39.3 cubic feet) in the dedicated cargo area and 1,982 litres (70.0 cubic feet) when its 60/40-split rear seatbacks are folded flat. That rear bench is made more passenger and cargo friendly via a centre pass-through that doubles as a centre armrest with cupholders, which allows longer items like skis to be stuffed down the middle while rear passengers enjoy the benefit of the window seats, although take note they might be grumbling on the way back from the ski hill due to a surprising lack of available rear seat heaters. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
A shelf-like removable load floor offers plenty of cargo space versatility. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Along with all of the features already mentioned, the $37,398 top-line SL Platinum gets a lot of premium-level upgrades that really make a difference when it comes to performance, safety, convenience and luxury, such as AWD, 19-inch alloy wheels, LED headlamps, an electromechanical parking brake, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a heated leather steering wheel rim and leather-wrapped shift knob, memory for the six-way powered driver’s seat and side mirrors, a four-way powered front passenger’s seat, a powered panoramic sunroof, dual-zone automatic climate control, navigation, a surround parking monitor, great sounding Bose audio with nine speakers including two subs, Radio Data System (RDS) and speed-sensitive volume control, a gesture activated liftgate, and more. 

2019 Nissan Rogue SL Platinum Reserve AWD
The Rogue provides more larger cargo capacity than average. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

I won’t tire you by scrolling through lists of everything that gets pulled up to SL Platinum trim from the other two grades, but some highlights from both include remote engine start, proximity-sensing access with pushbutton ignition, auto on/off headlights, fog lamps, LED turn signals within the side mirror caps, roof rails, the aforementioned six-way powered driver’s seat with power lumbar, a retractable cargo cover and more with the $29,098 SV, plus variable intermittent wipers, overhead LED map lights and sunglasses storage, a colour multi-information display, a 7.0-inch centre touchscreen, NissanConnect featuring Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, SiriusXM Traffic, hands-free text messaging assistant, Bluetooth, mood lighting, and more with the $26,798 base Rogue S. By the way, all pricing was sourced from CarCostCanada, where all the trims, packages and individual features are itemized, plus otherwise hard to find rebate info and dealer invoice pricing is provided. 

For the most part our 2019 Rogue SL Platinum Reserve was well equipped, especially when it came to advanced driver assistance systems, plus it provided more than enough performance, a smooth, quiet ride, great fuel economy, and a fairly luxurious and comfortable cabin, while it was extremely accommodating for driver, passengers and cargo. I like the way it looks, especially as my tester was kitted out, which, along with all of the above, is likely why it’s such a strong seller, and also why it’s easy to recommend.

It might look the same from the outside, but Nissan has nicely updated the 2019 Qashqai despite only arriving on our market two years ago.  As noted most changes go unseen, such as the adoption of Intelligent…

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
In our garage: the 2019 Nissan Qashqai in top-line SL Platinum trim. So what do you think? (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

It might look the same from the outside, but Nissan has nicely updated the 2019 Qashqai despite only arriving on our market two years ago. 

As noted most changes go unseen, such as the adoption of Intelligent Emergency Braking (IEB), Blind Spot Warning (BSW), Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA), and Nissan’s smart Rear Door Alert (RDA) system (that reminds if you’ve left something or someone in the back seat), across the entire Qashqai line, while the little utility’s interior now benefits from a new NissanConnect centre touchscreen that’s now 2.0 inches larger at 7.0 inches and features standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration, satellite radio, live navigation, plus mobile apps and services, while the base Qashqai also includes a second USB port within the centre console, and Nissan’s useful Divide-N-Hide cargo system in the storage area. 

19 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
Like its subcompact crossover SUV peers, the Qashqai offers a little more ground clearance than a regular sedan or wagon, ideal for trips to the cottage. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Even more impressive, all of these new features have been added without impacting the base Qashqai S model’s base price that still starts at just $19,998 plus freight and fees, making it the second-most affordable sport utility available in Canada behind Nissan’s own Kicks. 

19 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
No doubt, styling has helped the Qashqai jump into first place in its class. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Standard features that continue forward into 2019 and by doing so make the latest Qashqai seem like an even better deal include projector headlamps with integrated led daytime running lights, heated power-adjustable side mirrors with integrated LED turn signals, power windows, power door locks with a switchblade-style remote key fob, an electromechanical parking brake (which oddly reverts to a foot-operated one on S CVT and SV CVT trims), a tilt and telescopic steering wheel, a colour TFT multi-information display, variable intermittent wipers, sun visors with extensions and integrated vanity mirrors, overhead sunglasses storage, micro-filtered air conditioning, a rearview camera that’s now easier to use thanks to the larger centre display, Bluetooth phone connectivity with audio streaming, text message read and response capability, Siri Eyes Free, four-speaker AM/FM/CD/MP3/WMA audio with illuminated steering wheel controls, speed-sensitive volume, Radio Data System (RDS), fabric upholstery, two-way Quick Comfort heatable front seats, a rear-seat centre armrest, 60/40 split-folding rear seatbacks, a cargo cover, six cargo area tie-down hooks, tire pressure monitoring with Easy Fill Tire Alert, all the expected passive and active safety and security features, plus much more. 

19 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
The top-tier SL Platinum comes stocked with some upscale features. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

The Qashqai is once again available in three trims, the aforementioned base S model joined by the SV and SL, my tester being in the latter. Before delving into its new upgrades, standard features list and various options, the $25,998 SV is a good choice for those not needing the premium-level pampering offered by the SL, thanks to 17-inch alloys replacing the base model’s 16-inch steel wheels with covers, automatic on/off headlights, plus fog lamps, roof rails, remote engine start, proximity-sensing keyless access, pushbutton ignition, high beam assist, rear parking sensors, illumination added to the vanity mirrors, a powered moonroof, a heatable leather-wrapped steering wheel rim, a leather-wrapped shift knob, cruise control, two more stereo speakers, dual-zone automatic climate control, rear passenger air vents, etcetera, while a host of new advanced driver assistance systems get added including enhanced autonomous emergency braking with pedestrian detection, Lane Departure Warning (LDW) with Intelligent Lane Intervention, and Rear Intelligent Braking (R-IEB). 

19 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
We’ll talk fit, finish, materials quality, and how all the features work in our upcoming road test review. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

My tester’s top-line SL trim starts at $31,198 yet really helps to make it feel like a mini luxury ute thanks to standard 19-inch alloy wheels, the electromechanical parking brake again (the only trim that mates it to the CVT), a 360-degree Intelligent Around View Monitor, navigation with detailed mapping, voice recognition, SiriusXM Traffic and Travel Link, leather upholstery, an eight-way power driver’s seat including two-way powered lumbar, and a front driver’s seatback pocket, while Intelligent Cruise Control (ICC), enhanced rear auto braking with Moving Object Detection (MOD), and ProPilot Assist semi-automated self-driving capability are new to the SL’s standard list. 

19 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
A sporty leather-wrapped flat-bottom steering wheel is just one element of the Qashqai SL Platinum’s comprehensive feature set. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Lastly, my tester featured the $2,100 SL Platinum Package that includes LED headlights, an auto-dimming interior mirror with an integrated Homelink garage door opener, plus a nine-speaker Bose audio system, and NissanConnect Services. 

By the way, all pricing for the 2019 Qashqai, including trims, packages and individual options, was sourced at CarCostCanada, where you can also find money saving rebate info and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands.

SV and SL models also come standard with Nissan’s Xtronic CVT (continuously variable transmission), not to mention Intelligent Engine Braking, and while this will likely be preferable to the majority of Qashqai buyers you may enjoy the six-speed manual that comes standard in base S trim. I tested it last year and came away smiling, as it’s a well sorted manual gearbox that adds a lot of sport back into this utility’s character, which is more about smooth, quiet, comfort in its higher trims. 

19 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
Infotainment has become a key decision making differentiator in today’s new vehicle market. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

I won’t go into too much experiential detail in this garage report, being that we just brought it home from Nissan’s detail team today and haven’t spent anywhere near enough time in it to comment, but this is hardly the first Qashqai at our weeklong disposal so already have a good idea of what we’re about to live through. Suffice to say the 2019 Qashqai SL hasn’t disappointed us thus far, but rather reminded us why Nissan is quickly taking the lead in this all-important entry-level crossover SUV segment. 

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
Here’s a close-up of the top-line 360-surround parking camera. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

The Qashqai is Nissan Canada’s second-best-selling vehicle behind the larger compact Rogue, and quite frankly its growth in popularity throughout 2018 has been staggering. Sales were up by 119.2 percent to 19,662 units last year compared to just 8,970 in calendar year 2017, making it tops in its segment and after passing the Subaru Crosstrek that’s been on a 30.2-percent sales surge of its own, albeit with only 14,539 units down the road, while the new Hyundai Kona is close behind at 14,497 deliveries. Interestingly, Mazda’s CX-3 grew sales by 13.8 percent to 12,445 units, while the redesigned Jeep Compass found 46.4 percent more buyers in 2018 for a total of 9,434. 

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
Make sure to come back to read our road test to find out how the Qashqai SL Platinum’s standard CVT measures up. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Trending the other way is the once best-selling Honda HR-V that saw its sales fall by 35.9 percent to 9,071 units (although some of this results from a flood in its Mexican plant that shut down operations for quite a while), whereas the recently introduced Toyota C-HR made significant gains of 57.8 percent yet only managed a rather lacklustre 6,819 deliveries, and the entirely new (to us) Ford EcoSport enjoyed its first full year of sales, but found just 6,315 takers. 

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
Comfortable and roomy enough? We’ll comment on both in our upcoming review. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Moving in the opposite direction, a subcompact crossover SUV segment loser was the somewhat stale Mitsubishi RVR that experienced a sales decline of 17.5 percent to 5,750 units, while the Chevy Trax lost 25.1 percent to post 4,465 deliveries, which is just ahead of the aforementioned Nissan Kicks’ 4,362 sales despite that model’s mid-year arrival. The final two to make gains were the new Kia Niro, in hybrid and plug-in forms, with 2,659 deliveries for growth of 67.2 percent, and the Mini Countryman that’s also available in plug-in guise, and possibly due to this saw its sales rise by 36.9 percent to 2,479 units. 

Lastly, the biggest losers are Jeep’s Renegade with a downgrade of 60.4 percent to 1,193 units, and that same model in Fiat 500X form that saw its sales jump off the proverbial cliff by 90.8 percent to a completely pathetic 79 units, despite being a nice little SUV that I quite liked last time I tested it. 

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
Here’s a look at the Qashqai SL Platinum model’s rear quarters. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

The Qashqai makes more sense though. It costs less, and provides a lot more comfort and size. It’s actually quite large for its subcompact SUV class, reason enough for Nissan to slot the Kicks in down below, yet compared to the Rogue it’s a small fry, despite riding on a version of the same chassis architecture, complete with a fully independent front strut, rear multi-link suspension setup with stabilizer bars front and back. 

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
Cargo space is a big consideration in this small SUV class. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Under the hood is an efficient 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine good for 141 horsepower and 147 lb-ft of torque, while its previously noted CVT drives the front wheels or all four. To reiterate and clarify, base S trim makes the CVT optional, while SV and SL trims include it as standard equipment, whereas AWD is optional with both lower trims and standard with the SL. 

As you may have expected the 2019 Qashqai remains a fuel economy leader with a claimed 10.0 L/100km city, 8.1 highway and 9.2 combined with the FWD manual, 8.8 city, 7.3 highway and 8.1 combined with FWD and the CVT, or 9.0, 7.5 and 8.4 with the CVT and AWD. 

2019 Nissan Qashqai SL Platinum
60/40 split-folding rear seatbacks come standard. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

As usual I’ll wait to talk about driving impressions, interior quality, fit, finish and everything else in my upcoming road test review, although if you just can’t wait go ahead and check out my review of the 2018 Qashqai S with a manual transmission or my review of a top-line 2017 Qashqai SL, which is much the same as this new 2019 version except for a foot operated parking brake and some additional upgrades mentioned earlier in this garage review. Also, enjoy the photo gallery of this 2019 Qashqai SL above…