It’s been nearly a decade since Nissan launched its car-based Pathfinder crossover, representing a risky move that replaced three generations of body-on-frame SUV predecessors, as well as the Quest…

Redesigned 2022 Nissan Pathfinder rolls off production line

2022 Nissan Pathfinder
Nissan just started production of its 2022 Pathfinder, a completely redesigned model that will hit Canadian showrooms this summer.

It’s been nearly a decade since Nissan launched its car-based Pathfinder crossover, representing a risky move that replaced three generations of body-on-frame SUV predecessors, as well as the Quest minivan that faded away five years later, but it proved positive for sales. Now those awaiting its replacement before trading up can take heart, because the all-new fifth-gen Pathfinder just started rolling off the automaker’s Smyrna, Tennessee assembly line.

“Start of production of the new Pathfinder marks another major milestone in our Nissan NEXT momentum story,” said Jeff Younginer, Vice President, Nissan Smyrna Vehicle Assembly Plant. “The Smyrna plant team is thrilled to put the newest version of this iconic vehicle on the road for customers.”

2022 Nissan Pathfinder
The 2022 Pathfinder is almost entirely new, keeping its 3.5-litre V6 yet boasting an all-new shape and fully updated interior.

The new Pathfinder, which has been built in the Nashville suburb since 2004, pulls its sole 3.5-litre direct-injection V6 engine from Nissan’s Decherd Powertrain Plant in Decherd, Tennessee, located about an hour south on Interstate 24. The drivetrain’s all-new nine-speed automatic transmission, on the other hand, hails from ZF’s production plant in Gray Court, South Carolina, but would-be buyers hoping for greater performance will likely be more interested to know that it’s not the continuously variable transmission (CVT) from the outgoing model.

2022 Nissan Pathfinder
The new Pathfinder receives Nissan’s Intelligent AWD system as standard in Canada once again.

The new nine-speed auto should provide quicker, more engaging shifts when performing passing manoeuvres or managing the three-row mid-size SUV through fast-paced corners, while Nissan promises smooth operation as well. Additionally, standard Intelligent 4WD with a seven-position Drive and Terrain Mode Selector means Canadian buyers will enjoy optimal traction year-round. This is especially important off the line thanks to the powertrain’s strong 284 horsepower, the torquey V6 partially responsible for the new SUV’s impressive 6,000-pound (2,721-kg) maximum towing capacity.

2022 Nissan Pathfinder
The new Pathfinder’s interior receives improvements in refinement, larger, modernized electronic displays, and much more.

Along with wholly renewed styling that should appeal to Nissan’s many truck buyers thanks to plenty of sharp angles and rugged details, the bigger and broader version of its trademark “U” shaped grille especially notable, a completely redesigned interior provides seating for up to eight, new available second-row captain’s chairs (which reduce seating to seven), plus an optional 10.8-inch head-up display that projects key info onto the windscreen ahead of the driver, a large 12.3-inch digital gauge cluster, and the brand’s ProPilot Assist semi-self-driving capability with Navi-Link, while the Nissan Safety Shield 360 suite of advanced driver assistive systems comes standard.

2022 Nissan Pathfinder
Second-row captain’s chairs will be optional for 2022.

The new 2022 Pathfinder will start showing up in Nissan Canada dealer showrooms this summer, although those wanting to take advantage of especially good savings may want to consider the outgoing 2020 Pathfinder which utilizes the same V6 engine. Nissan is currently offering up to $7,000 in additional incentives when purchasing a 2020 model, and new zero-mileage examples are still available being that no 2021 version was produced. Be sure to check out CarCostCanada for all the details, and remember to download their free app so you can access timely info on available factory rebates, manufacturer financing and leasing deals, and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands on any new car, truck or SUV.

2022 Pathfinder and Frontier Reveal (14:39):

Dévoilement du Pathfinder et du Frontier 2022 (14:39):

The All-New 2022 Nissan Pathfinder ​(0:06):

2022 Nissan Pathfinder LIVE Walkaround & Review (5:31):

Design Spotlight | Nissan Design Director Ken Lee on All-New 2022 Pathfinder (8:55):

How many seats does the Pathfinder have? | 2022 Nissan Pathfinder Q&A (0:55):

How many trims are available? | 2022 Nissan Pathfinder Q&A (0:31):

What’s the towing capacity? | 2022 Nissan Pathfinder Q&A (0:39):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Nissan

It’s no secret that trucks aren’t updated as often as cars, although this has been changing in recent years due to peoples’ tastes shifting from sedans, coupes and wagons to more utility-oriented…

Redesigned 2022 Nissan Frontier will have you quickly forgetting its antiquated predecessor

2022 Nissan Frontier
The entirely new 2022 Frontier says goodbye to 16 years of the previous model, and hello to a much more modern and exciting design.

It’s no secret that trucks aren’t updated as often as cars, although this has been changing in recent years due to peoples’ tastes shifting from sedans, coupes and wagons to more utility-oriented offerings. No matter, because no one, including those within Nissan’s inner circle, could’ve likely guessed the Frontier would still be trucking along mostly unchanged after 16 years of production.

Currently the oldest non-commercial design available new, Nissan will pass this baton down to its own 370Z when the all-new 2022 Frontier arrives later this year, unless the Japanese automaker shocks us all with an earlier than expected release of the legendary sports car, of which today’s version now has a dozen years to its credit. Both will be important to Nissan’s success, albeit the new 400Z (as most are calling it) is more about enhancing the brand’s performance image, while the Frontier should do a good job of bolstering its bottom line.

2022 Nissan Frontier
The redesigned Frontier presents a fairly unique look within a hotly contested mid-size pickup truck market.

Of course, trucks are important for a mainstream brand’s image too, and just by appearances the Frontier should appeal to the masses. That will be important, as Nissan has lost a lot of market share to mid-size pickup competitors, most of which have introduced multiple redesigns since the last Frontier was new. Toyota’s Tacoma remains top of the list, followed closely by GM’s Chevy/GMC Colorado/Canyon (fraternal) twins and more distantly by Ford’s Ranger, which were all discontinued and resuscitated in recent years, and while no definitive word has surfaced about a revised Dodge (Ram) Dakota, Jeep anted up with its highly successful Gladiator a few years ago. Even Honda’s Ridgeline, the only mid-size pickup truck the Frontier still outsells, has seen upward sales momentum since its more rugged 2021 refresh, so it’s a good thing Nissan’s new Frontier will soon be ready to do battle.

2022 Nissan Frontier
Rugged looking and fully capable, the new Frontier should be a force to be reckoned with.

The 2022 Frontier arrives with boxier styling that pays some angular homage to the brand’s old Hardbody pickups of the ‘80s and ‘90s, albeit the new look gives more respect to Nissan’s full-size Titan, particularly the front door window cutouts that, like Ford’s F-150, are kinked to aid visibility. It seems influenced by GMC’s just-noted Canyon too, at least before the domestic truck said goodbye to its arguably better-looking rectangular grille and hello to a much deeper, chunkier version this year. Any resemblance to the Canyon will hardly be an issue for Nissan fans, however, as the new Frontier’s styling will be unique enough, is plenty rugged, and boasts lots of up-to-date LED touches.

2022 Nissan Frontier
Nissan uses LEDs to give the new Frontier’s headlamps special character at night.

Speaking of up-to-date, nothing from the old Frontier will be pulled forward into this new iteration’s cabin, which is a very good thing. The new model’s styling has been completely reimagined, and appears so refined that Nissan should really be considering a new Xterra based on the same platform. Where the old truck’s dash is rounded in retrospect, the new design is just as bold and blocky as the exterior styling, although in a more conservatively tasteful way. Stitched soft-touch synthetic appears padded ahead of the front passenger, as do the grip-like sides of the lower centre console, the example shown no doubt in higher-end Pro-4X trim thanks to its sporty orange/red highlights and premium-level finishings.

2022 Nissan Frontier
Pro-4X trim gets a sportier appearance package with lots of blacked out trim.

A mostly analogue gauge cluster features a large colour multi-information display at centre, par for the course these days, which should come packed full of functions, while the sizeable standard 8.0-inch touchscreen atop the centre stack boasts Android Auto, Apple CarPlay and all the other expected base functions, backup camera included, with that parking camera upgradable to an Around View surround monitor seen within a larger 9.0-inch display in higher trims. Likewise, wireless charging (albeit no wireless CarPlay) is now on the options menu, as is nine-speaker Fender audio in the Pro-4X.

2022 Nissan Frontier
The Frontier’s bed can be had with a track-mounted tie-down system, plus bright LED lighting.

Speaking of the Pro-4X, which is Nissan-speak for a serious professional-grade mud-slinging, rock-crawling 4×4, improvements include a special set of Bilstein shocks plus underfloor skid plates covering the transmission and gas tank, while cool red tow hooks can be found up front, and a special orange/red-enhanced version of Nissan’s new logo gets stamped front, back and inside.

2022 Nissan Frontier
Seen here in sportier Pro-4X trim, the Frontier gets modernized electronics and much more luxury than the outgoing model.

The 2020 Frontier (there is no 2021 model) included S, SV and Pro-4X trims (and can be had with zero-percent financing right now), plus a Midnight Edition that won’t likely be repeated for the 2022 model year, but may be revisited at a later date. Reportedly, a sporty Nismo edition will arrive at some point in the future too. The three main trims will once again be offered for 2022, although a more simplified lineup will discontinue two-wheel drive variants in Canada, other than a fleet-only base King Cab S work truck.

2022 Nissan Frontier
A nine-speed automatic comes standard, while wireless phone charging is available.

This last point clarifies that the smaller King Cab and more accommodating Crew Cab will both make a return, with the former available across the entire model range and the latter only unavailable with base S trim. This said, Canadian Frontier buyers can get Pro-4X with the King Cab, which will be a bonus for those preferring bed space over interior roominess.

Once again, the King Cab provides a six-foot bed, leaving the shorter five-foot bed for the Crew Cab, other than when the long-wheelbase SV model is chosen, which increases the span between axles from 3,200 mm (126 in) to 3,550 mm (140 in).

2022 Nissan Frontier
The new Frontier should definitely improve comfort and refinement.

Unlike the US-spec Frontier that received a new 3.8-litre V6 and nine-speed automatic two years ago, this all-new 2022 model will be Canada’s introduction to the much more advanced, fuel-friendlier combination. The engine puts out 310 horsepower and 280 pound-feet of torque, which should be plenty of fun off the line, highly capable during highway passing manoeuvres, and especially enjoyable when attacking the wild.

Off-roading in mind, all retail Frontiers get Nissan’s part-time shift-on-the-fly 4WD system featuring 2WD, 4HI and 4LO driving modes that connect through to an electronically-controlled transfer case. Hill start assist and hill descent control are included too, while the Pro-4X receives an electronic locking differential.

2022 Nissan Frontier
Rear seat roominess should be competitive.

Standard four-wheel drive means the Canadian-spec Frontier’s maximum tow rating will be limited to just 2,944 kilograms (6,500 lbs), compared to US-specified two-wheel drive models that are good for up to 3,408 kg (7,500 lbs). Both trailer weights are impressive, however, especially when comparing some in this class that can only tow up to 2,268 kg (5,000 lbs).

Wholly on the positive, Nissan’s Safety Shield 360 suite of advanced driving assistive technologies come standard in Canada, including automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection, blind spot warning, lane departure warning, rear cross-traffic alert with auto-braking, high beam assist, and adaptive cruise control.

The new 2022 Frontier will arrive this summer, with pricing and trim details expected before launch. Until then, make sure to check out our full photo gallery above, and enjoy all the videos Nissan provided below.

 

 

The All-New 2022 Nissan Frontier​ (0:06):

All-New 2022 Nissan Frontier (0:15):

2022 Pathfinder and Frontier Reveal (14.39):

2022 Nissan Frontier LIVE Walkaround & Review (6:40):

How big is the truck bed? | 2022 Nissan Frontier Q&A (0:37):

How much can the Frontier tow? | 2022 Nissan Frontier Q&A (0:33):

2007 Nissan Frontier Driven More Than 1 Million Miles (5:34):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Nissan

Remember the Micra? How about the Versa Note? Both were subcompact hatchbacks from Nissan, and both were discontinued from our market in 2019, at least partially due to our collective love affair with…

Nissan toughens up Kicks design while providing improved infotainment for 2021

2021 Nissan Kicks
The refreshed 2021 Nissan Kicks sports a larger, bolder grille and totally reworked front fascia design.

Remember the Micra? How about the Versa Note? Both were subcompact hatchbacks from Nissan, and both were discontinued from our market in 2019, at least partially due to our collective love affair with SUVs.

While probably more profitable for Nissan, this is not necessarily great news for entry-level car buyers, as the days of new $10,500 Micras and $14,500 Versa Notes are long gone. As it is, today’s $16,498 Versa sedan is the Japanese brand’s least expensive option.

Nissan’s entry-level hatchback is in fact the Kicks SUV, available from $19,398 plus freight and fees last year, and soon starting from $19,898 in refreshed form for 2021. They should be arriving at Canadian Nissan retailers soon, at which point Nissan will likely update its website to reflect their availability (only 2020 models were showing at the time of publishing).

2021 Nissan Kicks
A redesigned bumper provides an updated look from the rear.

A quick glance at the new 2021 Kicks and it will be easy to see that the auto industry’s bigger is better trend doesn’t seem to be slowing down, with the new models’ grille augmented significantly over the original design it replaces. This makes for a more imposing visual presence, albeit with a feistier, more impish attitude than the brand’s larger SUVs. The chromed grille surround nicely flows up and outward into a sharply shaped set of horizontal headlight clusters, while new LED fog lamps can be found just below on the model’s sportiest and priciest SR trim line. Changes are less noticeable down each side and in back, the former including new LED turn signals integrated into the side mirror caps, and the latter including a redesigned bumper.

2021 Nissan Kicks
The updated look ties in well with the rest of Nissan’s refreshed and redesigned SUVs.

Making the slight bump in pricing still more palatable, new standard exterior features include automatic on/off headlights, heated side mirrors, and a rear wiper/washer, while updates to the interior include a new standard 7.0-inch infotainment display with standard Android Auto and Apple CarPlay smartphone integration. This gets upgraded to a larger 8.0-inch touchscreen in mid-range SV and top-line SR trims, while additional options include a leather-wrapped steering wheel rim and shift knob, a single-zone automatic climate control system, plus Bose audio.

2021 Nissan Kicks
LED fog lamps are added to the Kicks’ sportiest SR trim.

Those wanting more power will need to be satisfied for the time being, as the Kicks’ sole 122 horsepower 1.4-litre four-cylinder engine remains unchanged, including its 114 lb-ft of torque. This entry-level model is more about fuel economy than all-out performance anyway, aided by an efficient continuously variable transmission (CVT) the continues into 2021 as standard equipment. Although fuel economy details have yet to surface for the 2021 model, today’s Kicks is rated at 7.7 L/100km in the city, 6.6 on the highway and 7.2 combined with its front-wheel drivetrain, and take note Nissan doesn’t offer an all-wheel drive upgrade for this model.

2021 Nissan Kicks
New side mirror housings incorporate LED turn signals.

Along with excellent fuel economy, the 2021 Kicks comes well equipped with advanced safety and convenience features including standard automatic emergency braking, rear automatic braking, lane-departure warning, blind spot warning, rear cross-traffic alert, and high-beam assist. Moving up to SV or SR trims adds driver alertness monitoring and a rear door alert system that warns when something or someone may have been left in the rear seating area, while top-line SR Premium trim includes a 360-degree surround parking camera.

2021 Nissan Kicks
The updated interior includes larger standard 7.0-inch and optional 8.0-inch infotainment displays.

At nearly $20k, the 2021 Kicks is priced right for a small SUV. In fact, the Kicks remains one of the most affordable new sport utilities on the Canadian market. Then again, the Kicks is now the entry point for a Nissan hatchback, which means Nissan no longer has anything to compete with the likes of Chevy’s super-cheap $10,198 Spark (which replaces the Micra as Canada’s most affordable car), Mitsubishi’s $13,858 Mirage, Hyundai’s $14,949 Accent, Kia’s $17,295 Rio 5-Door, or Honda’s now discontinued $16,390 Fit and Toyota’s similarly cancelled $17,290 Yaris Hatchback (2020 models of each are still available at some retailers), these last two joining Ford’s Fiesta that was shuffled out of blue-oval showrooms the year prior. Can you see a theme here?

2021 Nissan Kicks
Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration is standard across the line.

Giving the Kicks a serious run for its SUV money is the Hyundai Venue, a direct hit at $17,599, while Kia’s $21,195 Soul, Hyundai’s $21,299 Kona, Mazda’s $21,300 CX-3, Nissan’s own $21,598 Qashqai, and Chevrolet’s $21,998 Trax don’t cost much more, nor for that matter does Kia’s $23,095 Seltos, Mitsubishi’s $23,198 RVR, Subaru’s $23,795 Crosstrek, Chevy’s $23,798 Trailblazer, or Toyota’s $23,950 C-HR.

If you think this market segment is packed full of competitors, consider that Ford’s EcoSport, Honda’s HR-V, Jeep’s Compass and Renegade, plus Fiat’s 500X and Mini’s Countryman (arguably a premium subcompact SUV) weren’t even mentioned because they’re all priced over $25k (some well over), while Dodge and Volkswagen don’t even offer anything in this category, but the domestic and German brands should ante up something soon if they want to build their brands with first-time new car buyers, and thus remain relevant.

2021 Nissan Kicks
The Kicks continues to offer a roomy interior for good SUV value.

Look for the 2021 Kicks to arrive at Nissan Canada retailers later this month, or if you’re hoping to get a great deal you may want to check out the 2020 Kicks that’s not only priced lower, but can currently be had with up to $3,000 in additional incentives. Go to the 2020 Nissan Kicks Canada Prices page at CarCostCanada to find out how you can save big time, whether on manufacturer rebates as well as factory leasing and financing deals when offered, plus dealer invoice pricing all the time, the latter potentially saving you thousands off of any new vehicle. What’s more, make sure to download the free CarCostCanada app from Google Play Store or the Apple Store, so you can have all of this vital money saving information at your fingertips when you need it most.

Also, make sure to check out the complete photo gallery above, and enjoy the official Nissan-supplied videos that follow.

 

2021 Nissan Kicks Connected Technology (1:15):

2021 Nissan Kicks Safety and Driver Assistance Technologies (1:08):

2021 Nissan Kicks Overview (2:24):

2021 New NISSAN Kicks LIVE Walkaround & Review (4:44):

New 2021 Nissan Kicks | Limitless Possibilities (0:15):

2021 Nissan Armada and Kicks Walkaround with Nissan U.S. CMO Allyson Witherspoon (9:58):

Live: New Nissan Kicks Japan Premiere (48:25):

 

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Nissan

When an automaker creates a sports car as immediately classic as the now legendary 240Z, it’s often all downhill from there. It’s like the band that has a top-10 hit on their first album, and never…

Nissan’s latest concept is the Z car we want

2020 Nissan Z Proto Concept
The new Nissan Z Proto concept combines design cues from past and present into an all-new form.

When an automaker creates a sports car as immediately classic as the now legendary 240Z, it’s often all downhill from there. It’s like the band that has a top-10 hit on their first album, and never achieves the same level of musical genius again. Could the next Z be the one that finally outdoes the original?

Sometimes we forget that Nissan (then Datsun in North America) had already experienced relative success with another great sports car before the 240Z arrived in 1969. In fact, the 1965–1970 1600 roadster (and predecessors), named Fairlady in Japan and raced in SRL 2000 form by actor Paul Newman at the very beginning of his motorsport career, was the 240Z’s (Fairlady Z’s) predecessor despite looking nothing like it. Where the 1600 roadster looked and performed similarly to British and Italian sports cars of the era such as the MGB, Triumph TR4/TR5, Alfa Romeo Duetto/Spider and Fiat Spider, the 240Z left every other entry-level competitor in the visual and literal dust, and became an instant hit because of it.

1969 Nissan (Datsun) 240Z
The now legendary Nissan (Datsun) 240Z was introduced to the world in 1969.

The Zs that followed gained displacement to overcome pollution equipment and therefore weren’t quite as appealing, while the 280ZX added luxury and weight, a scenario that continued to play out with the 300ZX, although the second-generation 300ZX was absolutely gorgeous and extremely powerful for the era, and is therefore considered by many as the best Z since the 240. This said the 350Z was lauded for styling and performance when it arrived, while the 370Z added more luxury and weight, and has kind of worn out its welcome after 12 years on the market. This brings us to the here and now, with hopes that the yellow beast before us all is a thinly disguised seventh-gen Z.

2020 Nissan Z Proto Concept
Long overhangs have caused a 5-inch increase in the Z Proto’s length.

The Z Proto, as it’s called, appears more than just a concept. The name Proto is short for prototype after all, which outside of sports car racing circles means a near production ready concept designed to test the waters before a full introduction. Nissan has a history of near-production concepts, which bodes well for this car becoming the new 400Z, as netizen pundits are calling it.

Nissan has been teasing the next-gen Z for quite a while, first with a teaser video showing the car in silhouette a few months ago. This caused quite the stir, with many expecting a production-ready car to appear, but alas we only have a concept, albeit a nicely fleshed out one at that. The Z Proto looks like it could easily be a production model, from its graceful lines that pay greater respect to the original than any Z since the ‘70s, to its fully formed interior that continues forward with many of the key design elements that have always been part of Nissan’s much-loved super coupe.

2020 Nissan Z Proto Concept
The rear design incorporates styling from the 300ZX, as well as a roofline that pays tribute to the original.

From the front, the Z Proto immediately reminds of the early 240, 260 and 280 Z cars, particularly the blocky, rectangular grille that seems to pay tribute to a popular mod of the era which saw owners removing the thin chromed front bumper (this practice became even more popular amongst 280Z owners due to its larger safety regulated front bumper), but also shares similar sizing to the current 370Z’s frontal opening. Just the same, this has been the new Proto Z’s most criticized design element, with some thinking it’s just too big and square.

2020 Nissan Z Proto Concept
The Z Proto’s creased and domed hood pulls some cues from the first-gen Z.

The Proto’s elegantly formed hood plays off early Zs too, but with a much wider domed centre section that begins farther rearward after a more pronounced crease down the middle. The ovoid headlights are entirely new, however, sharing some circular symmetry with the first Z, particularly the daytime running lights that are supposed to represent the circular reflection of the transparent headlamp fairings used on Japanese-domestic-market (JDM) models (and aftermarket upgraded North American cars). Their flush glass-covered sealed beam look is more in-line with the fourth-generation Z32, mind you, which incidentally housed the Z’s first Xenon HIDs as part of its 1998 makeover, but the new concept uses LED technology.

2020 Nissan Z Proto Concept
Some classic design details separate the Proto from all Z cars after the first generation.

The Z Proto’s roofline, rear quarters and hatch, on the other hand, pull cues from a variety of eras, albeit mostly from the ‘70s due to moving most of its visual weight to the rear, which sees nicely upswept quarter windows as well as pillars with integrated “Z” logos, paying direct homage to first-generation models. This said, the rear lighting elements and back panel garner more influence from both the refreshed 1987-1989 Z31 and all Z32 300ZX models thanks to their large, horizontal taillight treatments, while the entire car is a major departure from both 350Z and 370Z models, necessary to provide a fresh approach to such an outdated model.

2020 Nissan Z Proto Concept
This full fleshed out interior combines classic Z styling cues with modern electronics and refinement.

For those wanting a return to what arguably made the original 240Z a great car to drive, its superb power to weight ratio, the Z Proto’s five-inch longer body won’t be good news unless Nissan constructs it from lightweight metals and composites. Doing so, of course, would drive the price up substantially, which means we’re only likely to see the same types of high-strength steels and alloys used in the platform-sharing Infiniti Q60’s body structure, with any exotic materials allocated to the much pricier GT-R.

The new Z Proto measures 4,381 mm (172.5 in) long, 1,849 mm (72.8 in) wide, incidentally, which is exactly the same width as the Q60, plus it’s 1,310 mm (51.6 in) tall. We can expect a production version to use at least as much aluminum for its body panels as the current 370Z, which gets a lightweight hood, door skins and hatch. Aluminum suspension components will make the grade too, the current Z already using an aluminum-alloy front subframe, engine cradle, and forged aluminum control arms (upper and lower in the rear), steering knuckle, radius rod, and wheel carrier assembly.

2020 Nissan Z Proto Concept
The fully digital gauge cluster modernizes the entire cabin.

Within that just-noted engine cradle will be Nissan’s impressive twin-turbo 3.0-litre VR30DDTT engine, an advanced power unit that delivers superb performance and much better fuel economy than the 3.7-litre V6 currently in use. It comes in two states of tune in the Q60, including 300 and 400 horsepower variants, with most pundits expecting a 400Z nameplate to accompany the most potent version. This said it would be an unusual move to limit the upcoming Z to just the top-line engine, as a 300Z’s lower price point would allow for many more sales, while a potential 300ZX could denote available all-wheel drive, currently standard in Canada in the Q60, while provide an ideal marketing connection to the aforementioned historical Z models. A six-speed manual is shown in the concept, nothing new here, while it’s possible the new Z will debut more forward gears for the automatic, which currently houses seven.

2020 Nissan Z Proto Concept
The usual trio of dash-top dials is included, albeit with a new turbo boost gauge.

As has mostly been the case through the decades, the new Z Proto’s interior is heavily influenced by first-gen Z cars, albeit with modern-day refinement and technology that far surpass today’s model. A key giveaway includes the sport steering wheel with its classic circular centre pad endowed with a “Z” logo instead of Nissan’s usual crest, but fans will appreciate the trio of driver-canted ancillary gauges atop the centre dash even more. Along with the usual oil pressure and voltmeter dials, the Z Proto replaces the current model’s digital clock with a boost gauge, a nod to the twin-turbo V6 housed just ahead.

2020 Nissan Z Proto Concept
A large state-of-the-art infotainment touchscreen will be included in any new Z.

The digital gauge cluster and large high-definition infotainment touchscreen are the most notable improvements over all predecessors, the former necessary for respect in this segment, and allowing for much more driver usability due to the ability to incorporate sophisticated performance readouts, while the latter should come equipped with all the usual modern amenities including Android Auto and Apple CarPlay smartphone integration, a big, clear backup camera with the possible option of a 360-degree overhead bird’s-eye view, and more.

The three rotating dials used for the heating and ventilation system strangely don’t appear to provide dual-zone capability, but it is automatic so this version is at least up to par with the current car.

2020 Nissan Z Proto Concept
The Z Proto’s 6-speed manual and single-zone automatic climate control are nothing new.

Speaking of the current car, the Z Proto’s side-window defog vents on the outside corners of the dash, and its uniquely shaped door handles with integrated air vents, appear directly pulled from today’s Z, a strange choice if the brand wants to wholly differentiate the upcoming model from the one it replaces.

The seats look fabulous, but such can be said for the current model’s top-tier Recaros too, all of which help to make the new Z Proto appear like a production model in waiting. Then again Nissan is calling it a “development study vehicle,” so we shouldn’t get our hopes up too high, even though the 2001 Z Concept ended up looking a lot like the 2003 350Z. Reports claim the production vehicle has been signed off and development is well under way, but so far we haven’t been given a launch timeline. Considering today’s Z is now the oldest generation of any model sold in Canada, they may want to get a move on.

On that note, the 2020 Nissan 370Z is available with up to $1,000 in additional incentives. Find out about this and other info at CarCostCanada, where you can learn about manufacturer rebates, leasing and financing deals, and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands. See how the CarCostCanada system works, and remember to download the free CarCostCanada app from the Apple Store or Google Play Store.

Also, make sure to check out our full photo gallery above and the three available Z Proto videos below:

Unleash the #PowerOfZ (2:18):

Hear the Z Proto roar (0:33):

Get ready for the Nissan Z Proto (0:29):

Did you see the new Z (check out the gallery above)? The Z Proto, which dropped on September 16, isn’t production ready, but its level of interior detail, its prototype-referencing name (prototypes…

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo Road Test

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
Still looking good after all these years, the 370Z is even more attractive in top-line Nismo trim.

Did you see the new Z (check out the gallery above)? The Z Proto, which dropped on September 16, isn’t production ready, but its level of interior detail, its prototype-referencing name (prototypes normally refer to near production cars, rather than concepts that may only be built to gauge public reaction to a proposed design language or garner some press for a brand while having a little fun), and Nissan’s history of building production vehicles that closely resemble their prototypes/concepts, make it appear more like the real deal than merely a dream car. Either way one thing is clear, the 2020 370Z Nismo I’m reviewing here has quickly become last year’s news, if not the last decade’s news.

Unfair? That’s what I’ll try to determine in this review. After all, if you’re reading this review, you’re obviously still interested in a car that’s been around for a very long time. Nothing I can tell you here will be any different than what I could’ve told you a couple of years ago, other than news you may have missed about the 2020 370Z 50th Anniversary model, that gets two, thick diagonal stripes on each door along with special badging and some other nice extras.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
Nismo trim adds black and red trim details along with more aggressive bodywork.

Nice, but I’m reviewing a Nismo, which is the best Z currently available. Its seasoned 3.7-litre V6 gets an extra 18 horsepower over lesser trims’ 332 for a total of 350, plus 6 more lb-ft of torque for a maximum of 276, and can only be had with a six-speed manual gearbox, a seven-speed automatic with paddles available in lesser trims. This is a performance purist’s machine after all, so why bother with a slush-box?

It costs a lot more than the $30,498 base Z too, at $48,998, but for that money you get special red and black accented trim, a gorgeous set of 19-inch Nismo Rays forged alloy wheels wrapped in 245/40YR19 front and 285/35YR19 rear Dunlop SP Sport MAXX GT600 performance tires, a Nismo-tuned suspension setup comprised of increased spring, dampening and stabilizer rates, front and rear performance dampers, a reinforced three-point front strut tower brace, and a rear underbody V-brace, plus a Nismo-tuned free-flow dual exhaust system with an H-pipe configuration.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
We’ll never see LED headlights on this generation of Z car.

Fabulous black leather Recaro sport seats with red perforated Alcantara inserts and harness slots on their backrests are included too, as well as numerous comfort and convenience features pulled up from lower trims, a shortlist including auto on/off HID headlamps, LED DRLs, LED taillights, proximity entry with pushbutton start/stop, an auto-dimming rearview mirror with an integrated backup monitor, a HomeLink universal garage door opener, automatic climate control with an in-cabin micro-filter, navigation with SiriusXM NavTraffic, Bose audio with satellite radio, a USB port, and much more.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
Gorgeous 19-inch Nismo Rays wheels frame upgraded performance brakes.

For all points and purposes the 2020 370Z Nismo is a great value proposition, that is until factoring in its age. In automotive terms its 11 years without a significant update make it ancient. In the entire consumer industry, Nissan’s own Frontier pickup truck is the only vehicle that’s has lasted longer, having arrived in 2004. A new Frontier is expected sometime in the near future, as is the redesigned Z noted earlier, and both will likely be much pricier than the vehicles they replace due to more sophisticated body shells, powertrains and electronic interfaces. The big question is whether the introduction of the new 400Z, as most are starting to call it, will cause today’s 370Z values to crash or, alternatively, allow them to hold in place thanks to the current model’s reasonably priced range. There’s no way this can be predicted, so we’re left with the gamble of choosing an ultra-old-school sports car that’s soon to be replaced.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
LED taillights are standard, but the Nismo badge denotes something truly special.

Still, it’s a very good car with plenty to offer performance fans. Acceleration is strong, with its zero to 100 km/h time coming in under five seconds, which might seem like a laggard when put side-by-side with a GT-R Nismo that achieves the same in the low threes, but it’s still pretty good. Likewise, where the GT-R Nismo tops out at 321 km/h (200 mph), the 370Z Nismo hits its terminal velocity at a respectable 286 km/h (178 mph). Nothing wrong with that.

Fortunately braking is equally impressive, thanks to four-piston opposed aluminum front calipers clamping down on 14- by 1.3-inch vented discs, and two-piston calipers biting into 13.8- by 0.8-inch rotors in back, plus high-rigidity brake hoses and R35 Special II brake fluid. Stomp down on the centre pedal and speed gets scrubbed off quickly, but I recommend doing so in a straight line as the car’s 1581-kg (3,486-lb) mass can be a bit unsettling when diving too deeply into a corner without reducing speed enough first.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
The Nismo provides nice detailing from front to rear.

Of course, this can be said for a long list of performance cars, many of which cost a great deal more than this Z. Hidden below the shapely bodywork is a double-wishbone suspension in front and four-link design in the rear that collectively ride smoothly considering the higher spring and stabilizer bar rates, plus stiffer roll calibrations and increased damping levels. The Nismo even gets a 0.6-inch wider track than non-Nismo trims, which together with a carbon-fibre composite driveshaft and viscous limited slip differential that come standard across the range, add to that planted feel I noted earlier.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
The 370Z interior, filled with plush suede-like Alcantara, leather and stitched, soft-touch surfaces, is quite refined.

All of this is great, but the aforementioned six-speed manual is even better. It features SynchroRev Match, a technology that instantly spins engine revs up to the ideal rotation in order to synch up with the upcoming downward gear before it arrives, as if perfectly blipping the throttle yourself. It makes any driver feel and sound like a pro, and provides a nice, clean engine-transmission match-up in order to minimize drivetrain jolt. Shifter feel is excellent too, with a wonderfully tight, crisp, notchy feel and positive engagement, while clutch take-up is superb, and the overall pedal arrangement ideal for applying the right-foot’s heel and toe simultaneously on the brake and throttle, a useful technique for modulating engine revs when braking into a corner.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
Old-school, but still very nice. The entire gauge cluster tilts with the steering wheel too, but the column offers no telescopic ability.

Those pedals are aluminum with rubber grips, incidentally, and look great, Nissan even finishing the dead pedal in vertically striped brightwork. There’s more brushed and bright metal throughout the cabin, but the theme is more of a red on black affair, the Nismo getting crimson red thread highlighting most of its key visual points, not to mention a red centring stripe at the top of the leather and psuede steering wheel rim, red gauge accents and those fiery red ultra-suede seat inserts mentioned earlier.

Suede-like Alcantara trims off the door inserts and armrests too, not to mention the sides of the lower centre stack, the latter protecting inside knees from chafing, while the dash top and door uppers were nicely wrapped in a thickly padded stitched leatherette for a premium feel. Following that theme is red-stitched leatherette flowing around the gearshift lever, and no I’m not just talking about the boot. Nissan actually finishes the top of the lower console in what appears like leather, making the car feel more like a luxury-lined Maxima than anything so sporty.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
We love the ancillary gauges… even the digital clock.

Back to those lightweight Recaro sport seats, along with superb support all over, their backrests get a set shoulder harness holes that look fabulous. The driver’s seat is eight-way adjustable and the passenger’s just four, and true to its performance mission these aren’t power-adjustable, but instead require hand-wrenching via a set of dials in the usual positions. Once set they deliver the goods, but those with oddly shaped bodies (like mine that has longer legs than arms) might find the steering column’s lack of telescopic reach disconcerting. This forced me to twist my seatback rake farther forward than I would normally have liked off the track in order to maintain optimal control, but it was never uncomfortable, just not as comfortable as it could’ve been.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
The next-generation Z will update the infotainment display, which is much needed.

If merely offering tilt steering wasn’t already enough of a faux pas, the 370Z’s gauge cluster and infotainment touchscreen are throwbacks to a bygone era. The former is actually quite nice for any lover of classic sports cars, thanks to a lovely set of analogue dials that include a centre-mounted tach and a right-side speedo, plus a tiny little red liquid-crystal display for the odometer (yah, an LCD, just like anyone old enough will remember from their high school calculator or better yet, early ‘70s digital watch, while the circular binnacle on the left is filled with two bizarre rows of tiny red diodes that light up to show the fuel tank level and engine temperature. This hover above and below another red readout, but this time more of a heavily-pixelated monochromatic Minecraft encounter trying to double as multi-information display, albeit with less convincing graphics.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
The 370Z’s six-speed shifter is superb.

Comparatively the centre touchscreen is advanced tech, but don’t get too excited just yet. Features include navigation, Bluetooth phone connectivity, and a number of car settings, but it’s displayed with yesteryear’s resolution quality, processing speed and graphic designs. My recommendation is to use its functions as required, because all work reasonably well, and then rest your eyes on the always wonderful row of ancillary oil pressure and voltmeter dials (plus a digital clock) just above (the upcoming Z Proto is showing off a boost gauge within its hooded threesome, hinting at the twin-turbo V6 ahead of the firewall).

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
Some cargo capacity is better than none at all, and the 370Z’s liftback design allows for easy access.

Cargo space isn’t the 370Z’s forte, but you should be able to throw in a weekend’s worth of bags for two if you pack light. Forget the clubs, of course, and don’t even think about going camping, the sporty Nissan’s gear-toting capacity just 195 litres (6.9 cu ft).

Nissan is offering up to $1,000 in additional incentives on 2020 370Zs, by the way, this useful info found at CarCostCanada that also provides info about available manufacturer rebates that dealers won’t necessarily tell you about, plus leasing and financing deals, and best of all dealer invoice pricing, or more specifically, the actual price your dealer pays for the car. This way you’ll know how far you can drive down the discount before even entering the dealership. I recommend learning how the CarCostCanada system works, and downloading their free app from the Google Play Store or Apple Store.

2020 Nissan 370Z Nismo
Check out this gorgeous engine cover and fabulous three-point front strut tower brace.

Getting a new 370Z for less than $30k would be quite the bargain, or for that matter lopping a couple of grand off the price of this Nismo model, or one of the 2020 370Z 50th Anniversary editions if any are still available. None provide fresh styling or new-edge tech, but each one looks great, delivers superb performance and pampers with a reasonable level of refinement.

Photos and story by Trevor Hofmann