The all-new, all-electric 2018 Jaguar I-Pace is already getting rave reviews from the automotive press, and soon we should be seeing them silently whisking through better neighbourhoods across Canada. …

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400 Buyer’s Guide Overview

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
The 2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400, shown here in First Edition trim, promises shockingly quick performance from a 100-percent EV drivetrain. (Photo: Jaguar)

The all-new, all-electric 2018 Jaguar I-Pace is already getting rave reviews from the automotive press, and soon we should be seeing them silently whisking through better neighbourhoods across Canada. 

Part of the praise has been lauded on styling, the compact luxury crossover SUV benefiting from trademark Jaguar design cues currently in use by the new E-Pace sport utility, its larger F-Pace brother, and pretty well every other Jaguar within the iconic luxury brand’s lineup, including the beautiful F-Type sports car. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
Many I-Pace styling cues can be found on other Jaguar models, but some are completely unique. (Photo: Jaguar)

The new I-Pace arrives on the market as one of only two fully electric luxury crossover SUVs available, not to mention the sole compact luxury SUV to be sold without an internal combustion engine (ICE). Its only competitor is the slightly larger Tesla Model X, and both have the clear advantage of targeting the EV marketplace with crossover SUV body styles. This said Audi and Mercedes are preparing SUV EV challengers that could make life difficult for the upstart Jaguar, so it had better get up to speed while it can. 

Get up to speed it will, and quickly. Standstill to 100km/h takes a mere 4.8 seconds, which makes it the quickest of all Jaguar “Pace” models. The fastest new E-Pace R-Dynamic can manage zero to 100km/h in a spirited 6.4 seconds, while the F-Pace S is capable of the same feat in 5.5 seconds. Top speed is limited to 200 km/h (124 mph), but pegging one’s foot to the floor can seriously impinge on maximum EV range. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
The I-Pace is long, wide and roomy inside. (Photo: Jaguar)

Estimated EV range is a considerable 386 km (240 miles) when driven more modestly, which should allow most users multiple days without the need to recharge, as well as the ability to undertake short road trips. Of note, 386 km (240 miles) is also 5 km (3 miles) farther down the road than the base Tesla Model X 75D. 

As long as you go easy on the go-pedal while maximizing the use of regenerative braking when coasting downhill, and spending as little time as possible at highway speeds, such range would allow someone living in Vancouver to drive all the way to Whistler, tour around a bit, and then come back again with enough battery storage left over for running some errands when you return. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
With a zero to 100km/h sprint time of just 4.8 seconds, get ready to see the I-Pace’s backside more often than not. (Photo: Jaguar)

The new I-Pace houses a 90-kWh liquid-cooled battery in an aluminum casing within the floor’s structure, and requires just 40 minutes to fill from a fully drained state to 80-percent capacity when hooked up to a 100-kW DC quick charger. On a regular 240-volt Level 2 home charger you’ll need about 10 hours to achieve the same results, or slightly less than 13 hours (12.9) to fully top it up. Still, considering the range available, a single night of charging, or alternatively multiple nights during off-peak hours makes the I-Pace easy to live with. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
The I-Pace interior provides the best in genuine materials as well as state-of-the-art electronics. (Photo: Jaguar)

On the other hand, it’s quite possible you’ll appreciate I-Pace performance even more than its range if access to a charger isn’t an issue. As noted earlier, the British premium brand’s newest creation has no problem leaving the majority of stoplight drag racers far behind when red turns to green, this thanks to an electric motor at each axle resulting in the tarmac gripping traction of standard all-wheel drive, plus the accumulated output of 394 horsepower and 512 pound-feet of torque. 

Also in the I-Pace corner is the British automaker’s expertise in lightweight engineering, shown in a monocoque body shell comprised mostly of aluminum. This is nothing new for Jaguar, which makes all but one of its production models from the light yet rigid metal. Underpinning this is a totally unique EV architecture that embeds the aforementioned battery within the floor’s structure. This allowed for much more flexibility when it came designing the cab-forward cabin. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
Jaguar dubs the two infotainment touchscreen displays InControl Touch Pro Duo. (Photo: Jaguar)

To put the new I-Pace into a measured perspective within the Jaguar family, it starts out 287 millimetres (11.3 inches) longer than the E-Pace and 49 mm (2.0 inches) shorter than the F-Pace, with a wheelbase that’s 309 mm (12.2 inches) and 116 mm (4.6 inches) longer respectively, for much greater front and rear legroom than either. Additionally, the roof of the I-Pace is 84 mm (3.3 inches) lower than that on the E-Pace and nearly 86 mm (3.4 inches) down on the F-Pace, resulting in a sleeker, sportier profile. Added to this is much greater width for a sportier stance and more interior spaciousness side-to-side, the I-Pace some 155 mm (6.1 inches) wider than the E-Pace and 69 mm (2.7 inches) more so than the F-Pace. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
Jaguar supports the I-Pace’ superb performance with a well laid out driving environment. (Photo: Jaguar)

The unique layout allows for a cab-forward design featuring a windshield that reaches far over the front wheels, as well as a shorter more steeply raked hood, plus shorter front and rear overhangs, with each wheel pushed out as far to its corner as possible, resulting in much greater interior volume and a strong, athletic stance. 

With much of its weight down low, which reduces the centre of gravity, and benefiting from the lower roof height just mentioned, plus the increased wheelbase and more substantive track that comes from the greater width just noted as well, it’s no wonder the automotive press is glowing about I-Pace handling. The standard chassis rides upon an Active Air Suspension featuring auto-leveling as well as the ability to reduce the I-Pace’ drag by automatically lowering a half inch at highway speeds, which reportedly combines for an exceptionally good ride quality and handling compromise. Additionally, the I-Pace achieves ideal 50:50 weight distribution, so expect a particularly well-balanced EV. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV4002018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
This fully configurable 12.3-inch primary gauge cluster is standard. (Photo: Jaguar)

Jaguar’s driver-configurable continuously variable Adaptive Dynamics system is optional, which analyzes vertical wheel positions, vehicle acceleration, steering inputs, plus throttle and braking actuation before it automatically adjusts the suspension damping settings depending on your personal drive mode choice (Dynamic being sportiest), while Adaptive Surface Response is also available, this system harvesting info from myriad sensors in order to calculate approximate adhesion levels on low-grip surfaces, such as ice, before you even apply steering input, and then after making your turn it minimizes understeer and oversteer levels by controlling throttle and braking inputs. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
I-Pace infotainment appears graphically clean and sophisticated. (Photo: Jaguar)

Braking in mind, two levels of regenerative brakes come as part of the standard I-Pace package, with either its high or low settings providing different degrees of “engine braking” when lifting off the throttle. It’s in the nature of EVs to slow down when removing one’s foot from the accelerator pedal, but providing firmer automatic powertrain braking makes using the brake pedal less necessary, easing everyday driving and saving on brake maintenance plus otherwise expensive repair costs. 

While performance is a critical element with any new Jaguar model, anyone familiar with the brand will also appreciate its rich heritage in luxury. Following in this tradition the new I-Pace combines contemporary design with beautifully finished, authentic fabrics, leathers, metals and woods, as well as state-of-the-art digital interfaces. Depending on trim, contrast stitched padded leather covers the majority of surfaces that aren’t finished in standard metals or hardwoods. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
The floating centre stack houses a separate touchscreen for climate controls and more. (Photo: Jaguar)

Specifically, the four leather-covered cabin motifs include Ebony (black), Light Oyster (light grey), Mars Red (crimson), and Siena Tan (caramel/saddle), while light beige and black headliners are available in woven cloth or Suedecloth. Even the steering wheel rim can be had in Suedecloth or traditional leather, while decorative inlays, which highlight key areas on the instrument panel and doors, include Gloss Charcoal Ash veneer, a piano black lacquer Gloss Black, a patterned Monogram Aluminum, and Aluminum Weave Carbon Fibre. 

A head-up display, which projects key information onto the windscreen ahead of the driver, is optional, but get ready to be impressed because a fully configurable 12.3-inch primary gauge cluster is standard fare, as are two infotainment touchscreen displays that Jaguar dubs InControl Touch Pro Duo, the main top screen measuring 10 inches diagonally and second, a 5.5-inch display used primarily for the climate controls, fixed lower on the sloped centre console. Available voice activation comes via Amazon’s Alexa, which was designed to promote the use of hands-free interaction. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
Trim choices are generous and the quality of finishings reportedly superb. (Photo: Jaguar)

Latest tech in mind, I-Pace automatic climate control utilizes an artificial intelligence (AI) system that senses the number of occupants on board before adjusting the temperature, while the AI system is also capable of calculating remaining EV range based on climate control usage, weather conditions, topography, driving style, and traffic conditions. 

The heating and ventilation controls sit atop a centre console that slants up toward the main display upon two flying buttress-style supports that house controls for the gear selector and driving mode switchgear, this paying respect to a design theme used by Jaguar in its F-Type sports car and new E-Pace utility, although the overall look of the new climate control interface, which incorporates large dials that appear as if they’re floating on top of a digital background, is even more futuristic. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
I-Pace interior roominess is more like a mid-size SUV than anything compact. (Photo: Jaguar)

Follow that centre stack down to rearmost portion of the console and you’ll find 12.2 litres (0.43 cubic feet) of storage space under the centre armrest, its generous capacity due to the absence of a transmission tunnel, whereas the rear seating area incorporates trays for tablets and laptops, similar in concept to what Jaguar has long offered in its top-line XJ. 

A panoramic sunroof sheds light over both rows of occupants, with those in the rear having the option of another two automatic climate control zones for a total of four. Back passengers can also benefit from Jaguar’s “Click and Go” front seatback attachment system, which allows features such as display screens to be mounted quickly and easily, while plenty of cargo area add-ons help enhance load space functionality. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
The new I-Pace houses a 90-kWh liquid-cooled battery in an aluminum casing within the floor’s structure. (Photo: Jaguar)

That cargo area measures 656 litres (23.1 cubic feet), which makes it considerably larger than the E-Pace’s 577-litre (20.4 cubic-foot) rearmost compartment and similar to the F-Pace’s 685 litres (1,510 cubic feet) of usable luggage space when the rear seats are upright. The cargo area is finished as expected in the premium class, with high-grade carpets, chromed tie-down hooks, and 40/20/40 split-folding rear seatbacks that expand on its usability, the centre portion folding separately to allow a couple of rear passengers the benefit of window seats while longer items like skis are stowed down the middle. 

As far as trims go, Jaguar Canada is offering the I-Pace in S, SE, and HSE trims, plus a one-off First Edition that will only be available for the 2018 model year. Pricing for the base S model starts at $86,500 before provincial government incentive programs in Quebec and BC (Ontario no longer offers plug-in rebates), with some yet to be mentioned highlights from its long list of standard features including 18-inch 15-spoke alloy wheels, auto on/off LED headlights with automatic headlight levelling and follow me home lighting, LED taillights, heated side mirrors with approach lights, rain-sensing wipers, and more. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
The I-Pace comes standard with LED headlamps. (Photo: Jaguar)

Preset your desired temperature via electric cabin pre-conditioning ahead of climbing over the standard metal treadplates with Jaguar script and taking hold of the soft grain leather-wrapped sport steering wheel, at which point you’ll also find the aforementioned standard Interactive Driver Display, as well as an electromechanical parking brake, JaguarDrive Control mode selections, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a Homelink garage door opener, an always welcome sunglasses holder, a fixed panoramic sunroof, dual-zone automatic climate control, a rearview camera, voice control, Navigation Pro GPS, Bluetooth connectivity, a Meridian audio system, satellite and HD radio, six USB power points, eight-way semi-powered front seats, Luxtec upholstery, storage under the rear seats, and more. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
These 20-inch Technical Grey split-spoke alloy wheels are exclusive to the I-Pace First Edition. (Photo: Jaguar)

Standard advanced driver assistance systems including autonomous Emergency Braking, Lane Keep Assist, a Driver Condition Monitor, Traffic Sign Recognition, Rear Traffic Monitor, Clear Exit Monitor, and Park Assist semi-automated self parking, while the I-Pace is also filled with the usual types of active and passive safety equipment expected in this class. 

Options with the base S model include the Adaptive Dynamics, Configurable Dynamics and Adaptive Surface Response noted earlier, plus premium LED headlights with signature DRLs, fog lights, various alloy wheels measuring 18 to 22 inches in diameter, gloss black or carbon-fibre exterior trim, auto-dimming and power folding side mirrors with memory, a wearable Activity Key, a heatable steering wheel, heated front and rear seats, a head-up display, a 360-degree surround parking camera, four-zone climate control, a cooled glove box, configurable ambient lighting, cabin air ionization, Meridian surround sound audio, a powered liftgate, the same with keyless gesture control, as well as various metal, hardwood and woven carbon-fibre inlays, interior materials and colours, a cargo net, storage rails, a luggage retention kit, etcetera, while available advanced driver assistance features include Adaptive Cruise Control with Stop & Go, High-Speed Emergency Braking, Blind Spot Assist, Steering Assist, and more. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
Aerodynamic details help keep the I-Pace glued to the road at high speed. (Photo: Jaguar)

Moving up to $92,500 SE trim adds standard 20-inch alloy wheels, premium LED headlamps, auto-dimming power folding side mirrors, a powered tailgate, grained leather upholstery, and a Drive Pack consisting of Adaptive Cruise Control with Stop & Go, High-speed Emergency Braking, and Blind Spot Assist, while $96,500 HSE trim ups the ante with a different set of 20-inch alloy wheels, plus Windsor leather upholstery, Meridian surround sound audio, a powered gesture tailgate, and a Driver Assist Pack that adds the surround parking camera and steering assist to the SE’s Drive Pack. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
This I-Pace First Edition, looking fabulous in exclusive Photon Red, is shown here breaking the Laguna Seca track record for EVs. (Photo: Jaguar)

A fully loaded I-Pace First Edition, like the one that just set a production EV lap record around California’s famed Laguna Seca racetrack, will set you back $103,500, but for that money you’ll get everything from the HSE as well as design details inspired by the stunning I-Pace Concept, including Photon Red exterior paint, 20-inch Technical Grey split-spoke alloy wheels, the choice of Ebony or Light Oyster interior colourways, an exclusive Suedecloth headliner, Gloss Charcoal Ash veneer inlays, unique First Edition branded floor mats, metal treadplates with First Edition logos, and more. 

If the new 2018 I-Pace sounds like your type of EV, make sure to contact your local Jaguar retailer to learn how you can put your name on one. It’s a very special electric crossover SUV from a brand that’s steeped in performance and luxury heritage, and therefore deserves your attention.

Jaguar installed its potent yet economical gasoline-powered Ingenium turbocharged and direct-injected 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine into its gorgeous 2018 F-Type sports car last year, with an after effect…

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
The F-Type is $10k less expensive thanks to this new 296-hp 2.0-litre turbo powered entry-level P300 model. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Jaguar installed its potent yet economical gasoline-powered Ingenium turbocharged and direct-injected 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine into its gorgeous 2018 F-Type sports car last year, with an after effect being a significantly reduced base price of $68,500. That was a $10k advantage over the previous base price, and this car, in model year 2019 open-top form, is in our garage this week. 

Pricing for the car in question starts at $72,500 this year, while the Coupe’s price has been raised to $69,500. With such an attainable point of entry the new F-Type P300 Coupe and Convertible models become prime 718 Cayman and Boxster competitors, while pricier more powerful F-Type trims continue to fight it out with the Porsche 911 and others in the premium sports car segment. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
The F-Type is gorgeous from all angles. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

The turbocharged four-cylinder should provide more than enough performance for plenty of sports car enthusiasts thanks to a very healthy 296 horsepower and 295 lb-ft of torque combined with the F-Type’s nimble and lightweight aluminum chassis and body structure, especially when considering that key competitors Audi, Mercedes-Benz, BMW, and Alfa Romeo don’t offer anywhere near as much output from their entry-level four-cylinder sports models, with 220 horsepower for the TT, 241 for the SLC, 241 for the Z4, and 237 for the 4C, while F-Type P300 numbers line up right alongside Porsche’s dynamic duo that are good for 300 horsepower and 280 lb-ft of torque apiece. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
Jaguar delivers impressive interior quality and comfortable surroundings. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Jaguar makes its eight-speed Quickshift automatic transmission standard in this rear-wheel driven model, a steering wheel paddle assisted gearbox that delivers ultra-fast shift intervals that result in a particularly spirited 5.7-second sprint to 100km/h before attaining a limited top speed of 250 km/h (155 mph). 

But how does it feel from the seat of the pants? Make sure you check out my full review of the F-Type P300 Convertible shown here in the photos, where I’ll divulge just how well all of this turbocharged four-cylinder goodness comes together. And don’t think for a minute that it’s not going to be positive. 

Even considering all of the other more powerful F-Type iterations available, including the incredible 575 horsepower SRV that I spent a week with over the summer, the new P300 has many attributes that stand out above its low base price, making it worthy of the “Growler” emblem on its grille and wheel caps, plus the “Leaper” atop its rear deck lid…

Silence is golden, and in the case of the inherently quiet Jaguar I-Pace it’s also very fast thanks to plenty of all-electric power.  The legendary British luxury brand’s new electric-powered crossover…

New Jaguar I-Pace sets Laguna Seca lap record for production EVs

2019 Jaguar I-Pace
When Jaguar announced the 2019 I-Pace’ power output we knew it would be quick, but a lap record holder? (Photo: Jaguar)

Silence is golden, and in the case of the inherently quiet Jaguar I-Pace it’s also very fast thanks to plenty of all-electric power. 

The legendary British luxury brand’s new electric-powered crossover SUV just set a record for “showroom stock” production electric vehicles lapping Monterey, California’s renowned Laguna Seca racecourse, just before going on display at the 2018 Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion and the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. 

American racing driver and Motor Trend journalist Randy Pobst did the honours, and despite losing the back end and scrubbing off speed through turn 3 managed an impressive 1 minute and 48.18 seconds (1:48.18). 

2019 Jaguar I-Pace
The I-Pace is seen here plunging down from the Corkscrew and heading toward the Laguna Seca straight. (Photo: Jaguar)

The I-Pace driven was in top-line limited First Edition trim, which means it was filled with more features than lesser S, SE, or HSE trims and therefore heavier, while it was also bone stock, with “no modifications whatsoever” made to help it accelerate faster, handle better or stop quicker. 

A Tesla Model S P100D had previously claimed the fastest production EV record around Laguna Seca, completing a lap in 1 minute and 47.62 seconds, but it reportedly received upgrades to its brakes, so therefore wasn’t to factory specifications like the I-Pace First Edition shown in the in-car video verifying his record (see video footage below). 

2019 Jaguar I-Pace
The I-Pace is a good looking crossover SUV that should become popular amongst luxury EVs. (Photo Jaguar)

The entertaining two-minute clip shows just how potent the new I-Pace is, and just how much fun. Pobst even chuckles while the I-Pace drops downward into the famed corkscrew (turn 8), an experience that often leaves the uninitiated breathless and hanging on for dear life as the car plunges from an elevation of 283 metres (929 feet) to 265 m (870 ft) within seconds (it’s the equivalent of a 5½ storey drop in just 137 m / 450 ft of track distance), the rollercoaster ride continuing on its steep decline past turn 9 (250 m / 820 ft), turn 10 (236.5 m / 776 ft), and turn 11 (233.5 m / 766.3 ft) before exiting onto the finish straight. 

2019 Jaguar I-Pace
If the I-Pace drives this well on a racetrack as challenging as Laguna Seca, you can expect it to manage highways and byways even better. (Photo: Jaguar)

Pobst, 61, has more than 90 pro wins under his belt, and most notably was the 2003, 2007, 2008, and 2010 SCCA World Challenge GT championship winner, the 1996 North American Touring Car Championship title-holder, and the 2005, 2006 and 2007 SCCA World Challenge TC vice-champion. Additionally in 2001 and 2006, the Dayton, Ohio native was a two-time class winner of the 24 Hours of Daytona. 

2019 Jaguar I-Pace
The I-Pace looks to have an attractive, well-appointed cabin. (Photo: Jaguar)

The new 2019 I-Pace uses a 90-kWh pouch-cell lithium-ion battery pack plus a permanent magnet electric motor at each axle for standard all-wheel drive, the combination good for 394 horsepower and 512 pound-feet of torque, which means it can sprint from standstill to 100 km/h in just 4.8 seconds before maxing out at a top speed of 200 km/h (124 mph). 

On a more practical note, the new 2019 I-Pace has an EV range of 386 km (240 miles), which should provide most users with multiple days between charges, plus the ability to travel short distances or extend road trips longer when recharging stations can be found along the way. 

2019 Jaguar I-Pace eTrophy
Jaguar will introduce a new I-Pace eTrophy racing series in December. (Photo: Jaguar)

The I-Pace battery pack only needs 40 minutes to fill from a fully drained state to 80-percent capacity when hooked up to a 100-kW DC quick charger, while a regular 240-volt Level 2 home charger will require about 10 hours to achieve the same results, or slightly less than 13 hours (12.9) to fully top it up. 

Nelson Piquet Jr. (BRA), Panasonic Jaguar Racing, Jaguar I-Type II.
Once part of Formula 1, Jaguar is now heavily involved in Formula E, its car shown here with regular driver Nelson Piquet Jr. at the wheel. (Photo: Panasonic Jaguar Racing)

To draw more attention to I-Pace track prowess, Jaguar has put together the “world’s first all-electric production based international race series” dubbed Jaguar I-Pace eTrophy race series starting later this year. It will smartly support the fifth season of the ABB FIA Formula E championship set to kick off in Ad Diriyah, Saudi Arabia on December 15, a series that Jaguar has contested since inception (out of eleven entrants the Panasonic Jaguar Racing team was runner up at the close of the 2017/2018 season). Sports car and open-wheel racer Katherine Legge (UK) has been confirmed as the team’s first driver, showing the series is already attracting high-calibre talent. 

Deliveries of the 2019 Jaguar I-Pace begin later this year, with pricing starting from $86,500 before provincial government incentive programs in Quebec and BC (Ontario no longer offers plug-in rebates). A fully loaded First Edition, like the one raced around Laguna Seca, will set you back $103,500 plus freight and fees. 

To see Randy Pobst put the 2019 Jaguar I-Pace through its paces around Laguna Seca, check out the following Motor Trend video:

Few who have driven the new Jaguar XE have come away complaining. It’s arguably attractive, mostly well finished inside, filled with an impressive load of features including some nicely kitted out electronic…

Nürburgring dominating Jaguar XE SV Project 8 super sedan now in production

2019 Jaguar XE SV Project 8
Not your average Jaguar XE, the limited production XE SV Project 8 boasts 592-hp and track-ready capability. (Photo: Jaguar)

Few who have driven the new Jaguar XE have come away complaining. It’s arguably attractive, mostly well finished inside, filled with an impressive load of features including some nicely kitted out electronic interfaces, and plenty roomy, plus its lineup of powertrains, ranging from a 247 horsepower turbo-four to a 380 horsepower supercharged V6, make the most of its lightweight aluminum body shell and agile independent suspension. Just the same, a hyper-powerful SVR variant would be nice. 

SVR, which is a sportier marketing variation of the short-form for Special Vehicle Operations (normally called SVO albeit shown on JLR products as an SV with an O wrapped around the outside and an R following), is the Jaguar Land Rover answer for BMW’s M performance sub-brand, Mercedes’ AMG, Audi’s RS, Alfa Romeo’s Quadrifoglio, Volvo’s Polestar, Lexus’ F, Cadillac’s V, and so on. 

2019 Jaguar XE SV Project 8
That massive carbon-fibre wing is necessary to keep the tail planted on the asphalt at 322 km/h. (Photo: Jaguar)

A number of Jaguar and Land Rover products already boast the three-initial moniker, but the most recent is the Jaguar F-Pace SVR, a vehicle directly related to the XE. Unfortunately, Jaguar’s compact luxury D-segment sport sedan has yet to be given the usual 550- to 575-horsepower supercharged V8 SVR treatment in order to compete with the likes of the M3, C63 AMG, Giulia Quadrifoglio, ATS-V, etcetera, but this is about to change as enthusiasts plugged into the Euro performance car pulse will already know. For those not in the know, meet the new Jaguar XE SV Project 8. 

2019 Jaguar XE SV Project 8
Only 300 will be produced, at a price of $188,495 USD, the equivalent of $247,940 CAD at the time of writing. (Photo: Jaguar)

After a reasonably long gestation, which first saw the Warwickshire, England SVO outfit’s skunkworks project semi-debut in camouflage photos in May of last year; then receive an official web intro in June; arrive in the metal at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in July (where it won a “Showstopper” award); make its North American debut in August at the Monterey Car Week; record the fastest time ever of 7 minutes and 21.23 seconds on the Nürburgring Nordschleife for a sedan of production-intent specification in November (which bested the aforementioned Alfa Romeo Quadrifoglio’s time of 7 minutes 32 seconds, although despite the Alfa being a full production car, Jaguar plans to improve on the pre-production XE SV Project 8’s capability when the final street-ready version arrives), not to mention the fastest lap ever for a Jaguar; and debut near final production refinements in April of this year, which was quickly followed up later in April with some track time by legendary sports car racers Andy Wallace and Davy Jones on the Goodwood Motor Circuit; the finished Jaguar XE SV Project 8 is almost upon us. 

2019 Jaguar XE SV Project 8
Legendary Jaguar sports car racers Andy Wallace and Davy Jones take the Project 8 for a spin on the Goodwood Motor Circuit (see the video below). (Photo: Jaguar)

“Most road-legal cars on track are a massive disappointment, but Project 8 is really something,” said Andy Wallace. “It’s absolutely staggering how it has been made to feel like a proper racing car. It keeps wanting you to push harder. It’s not bothered by Goodwood’s undulations, it just hunkers down and feels totally at ease, so you’re happy to get on the throttle earlier. It inspires confidence straight away.  

The brake pedal feel is fantastic. It is absolutely linear and you can feel what it’s doing. The steering too is brilliant. It feels like a car that’s developed after days and days, and hours and hours, of testing. You don’t just ‘luck’ something as good as this. Anybody can build a fast car. But to build a fast car that feels this good – that’s quite an achievement.” 

2019 Jaguar XE SV Project 8
The XE SV Project 8 doesn’t seem to have any problem hanging its tail out in controlled oversteer. (Photo: Jaguar)

“I’m used to powerful racing cars,” added Davy Jones. “But this feels really fast. The sheer acceleration didn’t feel all that different from a 700bhp racing prototype – and that really surprised me. It’s certainly Jaguar’s best track car I’ve driven since the sports prototype Jaguars of the 1980s and 1990s. 

There is no body roll, loads of grip, the braking is incredible. When you turn into a corner, it points in, when you step on the accelerator it wants to launch out of the corner. It doesn’t do anything to spook you. It’s such an accessible car to drive. The [8-speed automatic] gear shifts are so precise and so quick too.” 

2019 Jaguar XE SV Project 8
The XE SV Project 8 promises one of the best road/track four-door combinations ever created. (Photo: Jaguar)

It’s fair to expect the ultra-exclusive group of 300 XE SV Project 8 owners should be well pleased with their upcoming purchase, the custom-built hyper-sedan, hand-assembled at the SVO Technical Centre in Warwickshire, costing a cool $188,495 USD, the equivalent of $247,940 CAD at the time of writing. 

When it arrives the XE SV Project 8 will have the highest output of any street-legal Jaguar vehicle in the British brand’s long and illustrious history, its 5.0-litre supercharged V8 making a shocking 592 horsepower and 516 lb-ft of torque, while a sport-tuned eight-speed ZF automatic transmission promises the quickest possible shift intervals along with the ability to drop multiple ratios at once via non-sequential downshifts, which will quicken pre-corner setup to enhance circuitous road and track performance. 

2019 Jaguar XE SV Project 8
Expensive rubber no doubt, but the experience of finding the Project 8’s ultimate grip has got to be worth every penny. (Photo: Jaguar)

The eight-speed auto puts power down to all wheels, with a maximum of 30 percent motive power going to the front axle in order to produce rear wheel bias for maximum performance and feel. The all-wheel drive system will be torque vectoring, of course, while the electronic rear differential keeps temperatures low via an exclusive cooler situated within the rear diffuser. 

The XE SV Project 8 provides three driving modes, including Normal, Dynamic and Track, Eco not on the menu for obvious reasons, while this is the first time we’ve seen Track mode on an XE. SVO says that the drive modes adjust the throttle, torque vectoring control, dampers, steering, all-wheel drive system, and the stability control, which is about as comprehensive as such systems get. 

2019 Jaguar XE SV Project 8
“Project 8” is proudly displayed on the carbon-fibre wing. (Photo: Jaguar)

The regular XE already has an extremely agile, lightweight, aluminum-intensive double wishbone front and integral link rear suspension setup, but the SVO team has modified almost everything anyway. An in-house developed billet suspension knuckle includes ceramic bearings to reduce unsprung weight by 840 grams, while also improving steering response by minimizing friction and increasing rigidity. Speaking of stiffness, Warwickshire has uprated the suspension bushings, with those in the rear upper control arm replaced with ball joints, while both front and rear anti-roll bars have been modified to improve high-speed stability. 

2019 Jaguar XE SV Project 8
Only the front door skins and roof carry over from the stock XE, the Project 8 wearing mostly new aluminum and carbon-fibre body parts. (Photo: Jaguar)

The electrically assisted power steering and the continuously variable damper systems in the stock XE are both carried forward into the new Project 8, although they’ve been reprogrammed for quicker, more responsive reaction, while an available Track Pack provides manually adjustable spring platforms that let you lower the ride height by 15 mm to optimize handling. 

Nothing resembling the Project 8’s Brembo carbon ceramic discs can be found in any current XE, as the massive 400-mm front rotors are clamped down on with six-piston calipers and the 396 mm discs in back get grip from a large single piston caliper. Brembo claims that its new-tech brakes achieve temperature reductions of 38 to 93 degrees Celsius, which should all but eliminate fade even when on the track, important for a car that weighs in at 1,745 kg. 

2019 Jaguar XE SV Project 8
Is this the world’s quickest four-door? Its record fastest time ever of 7 minutes and 21.23 seconds on the Nürburgring Nordschleife makes a good argument in its favour. (Photo: Jaguar)

The larger V8 powertrain is responsible for most of the XE SV Project 8’s 24 kilos of extra weight over the otherwise sportiest supercharged V6-powered XE S (the aforementioned Track Pack reduces weight by 12.2 kg), but the aero bodywork, especially the massive wing on the rear deck lid, has got to account for something. It’s certainly necessary to keep the car planted at its 322-km/h (200-mph) top speed, whereas any weight gain hasn’t hampered its zero to 100km/h sprint time, which is claimed to take just 3.7 seconds (3.3 seconds to 60 mph). 

2019 Jaguar XE SV Project 8
The cabin looks beautifully finished with leathers, Alcantara suede, metals, carbon-fibre and more. (Photo: Jaguar)

“The SVO design and engineering team’s mission was to create the most track-focused road-legal Jaguar in history – not only the fastest, but also the most agile,” Mark Stanton, SVO Director. “As a result, only the roof and front door skins of the Project 8 body are carried-over unaltered from XE and 75 per cent of its mechanical hardware is new. This astonishing Nürburgring Nordschleife record validates the success of such extensive changes.” 

The rear door skins, unmentioned by Stanton, are formed from aluminum and much wider as they flare into the rear fenders, which are bulge outward by 55 mm to accommodate 305-width rear tires. Most of the other modified bodywork and aerodynamic aids are made from lightweight carbon-fibre, and the list of changes is far too long to itemize. 

2019 Jaguar XE SV Project 8
The optional Track Pack adds race seats, removes the rear seats in place of a roll cage, helping reduce weight by 12.2 kg, and adds manually adjustable spring platforms that lower the ride height by 15 mm. (Photo: Jaguar)

All the modifications result in a major difference to XE SV Project 8 styling, but those owners who still want to use their car as a regular driver will be happy to learn the interior hasn’t deviated much from the already spacious and comfortable stock XE. Rather than a third seat in the rear centre position, the SVO team has followed the usual rule for super sedans by providing two rear bucket-style seats. The previously noted Track Pack, on the other hand, loses its rear seats altogether for a track-ready roll cage. 

2019 Jaguar XE SV Project 8
Three hundred fortunate souls are going to have a fabulous summer. (Photo: Jaguar)

The “Project 8” embroidered sport seats up front are much more aggressively bolstered than those in the rear of the base car, although they’re still covered in leather with suede-like Alcantara insets. Rich Alcantara wraps the instrument hood, dash top, steering wheel rim and door inserts as well, while bespoke carbon-fibre lower console surfacing surrounds a conventional pistol grip gear lever in place of the regular XE’s rotating dial. 

The Jaguar XE SV Project 8 is currently in production, and will soon be available to 300 fortunate owners. Whether you’re waiting for yours to arrive or simply want to see one of the most powerful four-door sedans ever made in action, make sure you check out these fabulous Jaguar XE SV Project 8 videos: 
 
Jaguar XE SV Project 8 | World’s Fastest Saloon — the 7min 21.23 second record lap of the Nürburgring Nordschleife (7:58): 

  
Jaguar XE SV Project 8 | A Legend in the Making with Le Mans champions Andy Wallace and Davy Jones (2:51): 

  
Jaguar XE SV Project 8 | Laguna Seca and Pacific Coast Highway Debut (1:49): 

  
Jaguar XE SV Project 8 | Shelsley Walsh Hill Climb (1:27): 

  
Jaguar XE SV Project 8 | Wind Tunnel Testing (1:07): 

  
Jaguar XE SV Project 8 | Performance in Portimao (0:40): 

  
Jaguar XE SV Project 8 | Handmade by Special Vehicle Operations (1:00): 

  
Jaguar XE SV Project 8 | Portimao Track (0:41): 

  
Jaguar XE SV Project 8 | Pushing Boundaries (3:06): 

  
Jaguar XE Project 8 | Animated Build. (1:27): 

  
Jaguar XE SV Project 8 | Unleashed (0:57): 

  

When your head spins and eyes peel to catch a glimpse of the fabulous looking new Jaguar F-Pace sport utility driving by, you can be forgiven for not knowing whether it’s a 2017 or 2018 model. After…

2018 Jaguar F-Pace 25t AWD R-Sport Road Test

2018 Jaguar F-Pace 25t AWD R-Sport
Jaguar’s F-Pace looks no different for 2018, although under the hood in 25t trim is a new base 2.0-litre turbo-four capable of 247-hp. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

When your head spins and eyes peel to catch a glimpse of the fabulous looking new Jaguar F-Pace sport utility driving by, you can be forgiven for not knowing whether it’s a 2017 or 2018 model. After all, the larger than average compact luxury SUV has only been around since the former model year, so therefore its styling remains the same. Then again, if you hear the unique sound of a performance-tuned turbocharged four-cylinder engine, take note, as you’ve just witnessed a brand new 2018 F-Pace 25t or 30t blast past. 

The new gasoline-powered, turbocharged and direct-injected Ingenium 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine was first introduced to the 2018 Jaguar F-Type sports car last year, providing a new more affordable entry-level trim for attracting more sports car fans to the beautiful two-place coupe and convertible. Since then, both the F-Pace and the XE compact sport-luxury sedan have been given the same value-added treatment, which Jaguar hopes will make them more appealing in their respective market segments. 

2018 Jaguar F-Pace 25t AWD R-Sport
Hello good looking! The F-Pace looks great from all angles. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Specifically to the SUV being reviewed here, the already popular F-Pace receives a $650 price drop from $50,900 last year to $50,250 this year, while the 20d turbo-diesel, last year’s base engine, gets a minor $350 price increase to $51,250. 

Along with the reduced pricing comes dramatically improved performance in base trim, the 20d being highly efficient yet not as quick as the new gasoline-powered turbo-four. By the numbers, the new F-Pace 25t AWD model’s zero to 100km/h sprint time drops to just 6.8 seconds from 8.7, while its top speed increases from 208 to 217 km/h. 

2018 Jaguar F-Pace 25t AWD R-Sport
R-Sport trim includes these standard LED headlamps. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

This newfound energy is due to differences in the way gasoline and diesel engines make their power and torque, in this case the 25t good for 247 horsepower at 5,500 rpm and 269 lb-ft of torque from 1,200 to 4,500 rpm, while the 20d makes 180 horsepower at 4,000 rpm and 318 lb-ft of torque from 1,750 to 2,500 rpm. 

As noted the tradeoff is fuel-efficiency, with the F-Pace 25t AWD estimated to achieve a Transport Canada five-cycle fuel economy rating of 10.7 L/100km in the city, 8.8 on the highway and 9.9 combined, and the F-Pace 20d AWD good for a claimed 8.9 city, 7.2 highway and 8.1 combined, a considerable savings even before factoring in the price of diesel fuel, which is less expensive in most jurisdictions. Your choice will come down to priorities. The performance option is now standard, while a mere $1,000 bump upwards for the turbo-diesel makes it a viable option for those wanting to eke as much distance as possible out of a tank of fuel. 

2018 Jaguar F-Pace 25t AWD R-Sport
An available Black Pack removes some key chrome and body-colour trim and replaces it with glossy black. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

The new 2.0-litre turbo-four comes standard with aforementioned base Premium trim, as well as mid-range Prestige trim that starts at $54,750, and my test model’s performance-oriented R-Sport trim that can be had for $60,000. 

Earlier in this review I mentioned the F-Pace 30t, which is an even more potent version of the 2.0-litre Ingenium turbo-four. It starts at $52,750 and can be had in all of the above trims, while it also becomes the new base engine for the more feature-filled $67,200 Portfolio model, this engine putting out 296 horsepower and 295 lb-ft of torque for a 6.0-second sprint from zero to 100km/h and a top speed of 233 km/h. Despite the much-improved performance, fuel economy is only minimally affected at just 10.9 L/100km city, 8.7 city and 9.9 combined. 

2018 Jaguar F-Pace 25t AWD R-Sport
These 20-inch alloys come standard with the R-Sport. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Lastly, the F-Pace can also be had with a 3.0-litre supercharged V6 that’s good for 380 horsepower and 332 lb-ft of torque, making the so-named F-Pace S AWD a full half-second faster from zero to 100km/h than the F-Pace 30t AWD, with a quickest time of 5.5 seconds and higher terminal velocity of 250 km/h. 

As part of Jaguar’s overall value proposition, the F-Pace receives standard all-wheel drive, while this four-season advantage is also joined up to a highly efficient, quick-shifting eight-speed ZF automatic that includes auto start/stop, which shuts the engine off when it would otherwise be idling in order to save fuel and reduce emissions. Also included is the brand’s trademark space-saving rotating dial gear selector that wows passengers by powering upwards at startup, plus shift paddles on the steering wheel come standard. 

2018 Jaguar F-Pace 25t AWD R-Sport
Of course, the standard taillights incorporate LEDs. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Like most Jaguars, the F-Pace is built using lightweight, recyclable aluminum body panels, internal framework and chassis components, which sets it apart from the majority of its competitors. Of course, such significant mass reduction not only minimizes fuel usage, but also helps the F-Pace achieve all the straight-line acceleration numbers mentioned earlier, while benefiting braking and handling as well. 

My tester’s 255/50R20 Michelin Latitude Tour HPs on twinned five-spoke alloys were a step up from the base 19s, the wheel and tire upgrade part of R-Sport trim that also adds uprated 350-mm front brake rotors for improved stopping power if you opt for the more formidable 30t engine, while less potent models like my loaner rely on 325-mm front discs that still provided strong, linear braking capability with minimal fade after repeated stomps on the pedal. 

2018 Jaguar F-Pace 25t AWD R-Sport
Attractive interior design, superb digital interfaces, and an impressive assortment of features help us give a pass to some poor quality plastics. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

And there really is a need for better braking, as the combination of a lighter engine with stronger performance makes for a much sportier base F-Pace. When not trying to make the most of my tank of fuel by tapping the console-mounted JaguarDrive Control rocker switch into Eco mode, I kept it north of Normal in Dynamic sport mode, which stiffened the steering and energized the throttle mapping for a more exciting drive, the 25t AWD feeling even more athletically inclined than the 20d through the curves due to its ability to get more power down to the wheels mid-corner, while the note of the higher revving engine sounds more spirited as well. 

2018 Jaguar F-Pace 25t AWD R-Sport
Jaguar lays the cockpit out like a sports car, but the F-Pace’ excellent visibility makes its SUV roots known. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Jaguar also includes a Rain/Ice/Snow mode, important for the ever colder winters we’ve been experiencing lately, not to mention jaunts up the ski hill during that cold season or mucking ones way out of a muddy back road after a rainy summer weekend away at the cottage. Together with the all-wheel drive system, All Surface Progress Control for even more grip in slippery conditions, plus brake-system applied torque vectoring to improve handling and stability at higher speeds, the F-Pace is one of the more confidence inspiring SUVs in its class. 

Good visibility is as important a confidence builder as anything else, and to that end the R-Sport creates more day-like light at night than the base model’s halogen headlights with daytime running lights (DRLs), as well as the Prestige model’s bi-function Xenon headlights with signature “J” blade LED DRLs by adding full LED headlamps with adaptive corning capability and auto high beam assist, these also adding a more sophisticated look. 

2018 Jaguar F-Pace 25t AWD R-Sport
A fully configurable digital TFT gauge cluster is available. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Along with the LED headlamps the R-Sport gains visual impact via an exclusive body styling and exterior trim kit comprised of a sportier front bumper design, satin-chrome front fender “power vents” with R-Sport badges, body-colour R-Sport door claddings with grained matte black finishers, and more, which makes the addition of standard blindspot monitoring with reverse traffic detection all the more important—we wouldn’t want to scratch all that sporty bodywork now, would we? 

The front and rear parking sensors pulled up from Prestige trim help in this respect too, that mid-range model also providing the R-Sport with headlight power washers, a powered steering column with memory, cool soft glowing mood lighting, a very accurate and easy to program navigation system, and more. 

2018 Jaguar F-Pace 25t AWD R-Sport
The well sorted F-Pace centre stack can be optioned to include this 2.0-inch larger 10.2-inch infotainment touchscreen. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

All F-Pace R-Sport models get the most important advanced driver assistance systems too, including collision warning with autonomous emergency braking and lane monitoring with lane keeping assist, while a driver condition monitor makes sure you’re not falling asleep at the wheel. 

Additionally, you’ll be stepping over R-Sport branded metal treadplates to get inside, where you’ll also find exclusive bright sport pedals, a satin chrome console storage surround to go along with the satin chrome touchscreen surround that also gets pulled up from Prestige trim, perforated grained leather upholstery, and more. 

2018 Jaguar F-Pace 25t AWD R-Sport
The infotainment system comes loaded with features, navigation being optional. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Lastly, some highlights from base Premium trim that remain part of this R-Sport model include proximity access and ignition, an electromechanical parking brake, a garage door opener, rain-sensing wipers, touch-sensitive JaguarSense switchgear for the LED overhead lights, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, auto-dimming and power-folding heatable side mirrors with approach lights and memory, driver’s seat memory, dual-zone auto climate control, a large 8.0-inch infotainment touchscreen with attractive graphics and an easy-to-use layout, an excellent backup camera with dynamic guidelines, great sounding 11-speaker 380-watt Meridian audio, satellite radio, Bluetooth audio streaming, a massive panoramic sunroof, a powered liftgate, a reversible load floor that switches from luxury carpeting to a more washable rubberized surface, more convenient 40/20/40 split-folding rear seatbacks that allow longer items like skis down the middle while rear occupants enjoy the more comfortable window seats, a commodious 648-litre (22.9 cubic-foot) cargo compartment (948 litres or 33.5 cubic feet by U.S. EPA standards) that expands to a generous 1,798 litres (63.5 cubic feet), etcetera. 

2018 Jaguar F-Pace 25t AWD R-Sport
Jaguar’s rotating gear selector is smart, efficient and wow’s passengers as it powers up from its otherwise flush resting position on startup. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Incidentally, the fully configurable 12.3-inch HD TFT Virtual Instrument Display you may have already seen in a photo as part of this review isn’t standard with the F-Pace or this R-Sport trim, but rather it’s an upgrade (from a regular analogue gauge cluster with a 5.0-inch colour multi-info display) that comes as part of the $3,320 Technology Pack, which also includes an enhanced InControl Touch Pro Navigation system on a larger 10.2-inch widescreen display; InControl Pro Services featuring a door-to-door route planner companion app, the ability to share your ETA, a Commute Mode that learns your regular route and automatically advises of traffic problems and possible detours, plus an Arrival Mode that displays an interactive 360-degree street view of your destination; and a sensational Meridian surround sound system with Trifield Technology, 825 watts of power through 16 amplifier channels, 17 speakers including a sub, Advanced DSP, Audyssey MultEQ equalization, and dynamic volume control. 

2018 Jaguar F-Pace 25t AWD R-Sport
The R-Design’s seats are extremely comfortable and plenty supportive. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Jaguar also added a $440 heated front windshield, a factory-installed $720 tow hitch receiver, and finished the outer panels in no-cost Fuji White paint (one of 12 colour choices), while its complete lack of exterior chrome trim meant that a $510 Black Pack R-Sport trim package replaced the metal brightwork surrounding the grille, side power vents and side window surrounds with Gloss Black, while the mesh grille itself was also glossy black, as were the otherwise body-colour door cladding finishers. 

2018 Jaguar F-Pace 25t AWD R-Sport
Kudos to Jaguar’s interior design team for dreaming up this cool light green stitching on grey leather motif. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

My tester also featured no-cost Oyster medium grey leather with cool looking light green contrast stitching (Ebony with white stitching, two-tone Ebony/Pimento with red stitching, and two-tone Ebony/Light Oyster with light grey stitching are no-cost options too), this found across the dash, down the sides of the centre stack/console, on the door panels, the armrests and the seat upholstery, while the R-Sport model’s standard piano black lacquered instrument and door panel inlays were replaced with $260 Etched Aluminum ($410 worth of Satin Burr Ash hardwood is also available). 

While the F-Pace 25t AWD R-Sport that Jaguar loaned to me for my weeklong test was nicely outfitted, there were many more features that could have been added to this specific trim, such as an $1,130 Adaptive Dynamics Pack featuring configurable electronically controlled dampers and Adaptive Surface Response (ASR); a $2,040 Comfort and Convenience Pack with cooled front seats, heatable rear outboard seats, power-reclining rear seatbacks, rear seat remote release levers, and a gesture liftgate; a $2,350 Luxury Interior Pack with illuminated treadplates, a Suedecloth headliner, four-zone climate control, an air quality sensor, a cooled glove box, configurable mood lighting, premium carpet mats, and two 12-volt power sockets in the second row; a $3,320 Driver Assist Pack including a surround parking camera, a 360-degree Parking Aid, semi-autonomous Park Assist self-parking, traffic sign recognition, an Adaptive Speed Limiter, and Adaptive Cruise Control with Queue Assist and Intelligent Emergency Braking. 

2018 Jaguar F-Pace 25t AWD R-Sport
This massive powered panoramic sunroof comes standard across the F-Pace line. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Finally, standalone features not yet mentioned include $160 cargo storage rails, $360 InControl WiFi, a $410 waterproof Activity Key that wears like a bracelet while swimming or doing other outdoor activities, a $490 full size spare tire on a matching alloy wheel, a $1,020 head-up display, and myriad wheel and tire options. 

If I could find a weakness it’s the use of subgrade hard plastics in unusually visual areas, such as the shroud above the primary gauge cluster. Bizarrely, the Toyota Corolla I was testing during the same week featured a much more upscale surface treatment in the same area, but like the F-Pace its glove box lid and lower door plastics were also made from hard shell plastic, something you’d never find in a competitive BMW X3. Such blatant cost cutting is obviously not an issue for the thousands of luxury buyers that have stepped up to Jaguar’s largest and priciest SUV, but plenty of others may have been turned off, so the British brand may want to address this issue by upgrading key areas done better by competitors. 

2018 Jaguar F-Pace 25t AWD R-Sport
Rear seat roominess is very generous. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Speaking of market growth, before the F-Pace arrived Jaguar had zero SUV sales, but after just seven months on the market it had found 1,289 buyers, while after a full 12 months of sales ending on December 31, 2017 the F-Pace managed 2,612 deliveries, placing it eighth out of 14 competitors. What’s more, the F-Pace clearly leads all other Jaguar models in sales, proving once again how important sport utilities are to a brand’s bottom line. 

2018 Jaguar F-Pace 25t AWD R-Sport
The F-Pace is one of the more accommodating SUVs in its class. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

While the F-Pace is up against some serious competitors, the market segment led by Audi’s all-new Q5, Acura’s completely redesigned RDX, Mercedes’ still fresh GLC, Lexus’ edgy NX, and BMW’s fully reworked X3, just to name a handful, it’s easily one of the sportiest of its ilk, arguably one of the best looking, and no doubt one of the most practical due to its larger than average size. Its newfound increase in base performance and slight decrease in price should only help it gain more traction in its segment, which bodes well for a positive future. Now the question remains whether you’ll be part of its success story.