I’m not going to lie to you. As curious as I am to spend a given week with seriously important big market cars like the recently redesigned Toyota Corolla, and as interested as I am to find out how…

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR Road Test

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR
Beautiful enough for you? Jaguar’s F-Type Coupe SVR drives even better than it looks. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

I’m not going to lie to you. As curious as I am to spend a given week with seriously important big market cars like the recently redesigned Toyota Corolla, and as interested as I am to find out how far I can go on a single charge with Kia’s latest Soul EV, nothing gets me out of my editor’s chair as quickly or as enthusiastically as a hopped up muscle car, a high-revving super-exotic, or something along the lines of Jaguar’s F-Type SVR, which might be the perfect combination of both. 

Regular readers will remember that I spent a blissful week with this very same car last year in its more eye-arresting Ultra Blue paintwork, so having this 2019 model gifted to me for yet another seven heavenly days was a welcome surprise made better due to its stealth Santorini Black bodywork that thankfully doesn’t attract quite as much attention. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR
Gorgeous from all angles, the F-Type SVR makes a formidable visual statement. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

It’s not that I was embarrassed to be seen in it, quite the opposite of course, but rather that this car coaxes my most juvenile impulses from their hardly deep recesses all too easily, which can quickly get a person deep into trouble. 

How quickly? Well that depends on whether you’re thrown into a stupor or moved into action when first laying eyes on the F-Type SVR, as well as which sense moves you most. If you’re visually stimulated first and foremost, you might be stopped dead in your tracks as soon as it comes into view, but then again if your receptors respond more to an auditory trigger you’ll move right past first sight to initial startup, resulting in the rasp of one of the more sensational exhaust notes in autodom, which will either send you to the moon in a momentary daze or turn you toward the street to put some of that wound up energy to good use. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR
The SVR’s many finely crafted details impress. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

I’m jaded, or maybe it’s just that experience tells me not to waste a moment gawking inanely at something I can relive later in pictures. Certainly one can recall memories of moments well spent, but the more one collects such moments makes recalling them a helluvalot easier. A quick glance of appreciation, out of respect, immediately followed by a quicker descent into a familiar body hug, the SVR’s performance seats are as wholly enveloping as they’re sinfully comfortable. Foot on brake pedal, finger on start button, mechanical machinations ignited and ahhh… glory hallelujah! What a sound! 

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR
These stunning 20-inch alloys come as part of a $13k carbon ceramic brake upgrade. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann)

Nothing roadworthy this side of an XJR-15 sounds as brutally raw, as purely visceral as an F-Type SVR being brought to life, that is until you’ve given the throttle a few more blips after opening up its two-mode titanium and Inconel active exhaust system via a wee little console-mounted button that makes a great big noise. Any sort of right foot twitch capable of spinning the crank above 4,000 revolutions per minute lets loose a cacophony of crackling barks and blats, the kind of song that’ll have gearheads singing along in dissonant unity, and zero emissions folks sneering. 

Allowing spent gases to exit more freely isn’t exactly the Tesla mantra, and to think the minds behind this wondrous high-test glutton are the very crew responsible for the Model X-beating I-Pace (well, it beats the entry-level Tesla crossover, at least). We’ve all got to love the bizarre dichotomy running rampant in today’s automotive market, where the cars we all lust after are paying for the ones that government mandates are forcing down our throats. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR
The SVR’s interior comes filled with red-stitched Suedecloth and quilted leather. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Of course, thanks to companies like Jaguar and Tesla we’re all beginning to realize that going electric isn’t the end of motorized fun, but potentially a new beginning. Could there be an electrified F-Type in our future? Likely, and it’ll be the quickest Jaguar sports car ever. Still, the good folks at Castle Bromwich will need to expend terahertz levels of energy in their artificial sound lab to recreate the auditory ecstasy this SVR composes. Let’s hope they succeed, because we all know that as sensational as this 5.0-litre supercharged V8 sounds, and as fabulously fast as this Jaguar becomes when powered by it, the still impressive yet nevertheless 23-year-old AJ-8 power unit’s days are numbered. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR
Equal parts luxury and down-to-business performance. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

As it is, this 575 horsepower beast catapults from naught to 100km/h in just 3.7 seconds before attaining the seemingly unattainable terminal velocity of 322 km/h (200 mph)—that’s 1.1 seconds quicker and 122 km/h (75.8 mph) faster than the I-Pace, in case you were wondering. Certainly a driver’s license would be unobtainable for the remainder of my sorry life if I were so foolish as to attempt the former speed on public roads, and being that no such track is long enough within close proximity of my home we’ll all just need to take Jaguar’s word for it. Suffice to say that zero to all other cars at the stoplight looking like tiny coloured dots happens all of a shockingly sudden, so you’d better gather your stunned thoughts, get into the game and prepare for upcoming corners or you’ll fast be shuffled off this mortal coil. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR
I’ll never complain about a beautifully designed set of analogue gauges, while the 5.0-inch MID provides good functionality. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Fortunately the F-Type SVR manages all roads serpentine as easily as it’s guided down the straight and narrow, its brilliantly quick-shifting eight-speed automatic as ideally suited to flicking up through the gears as for rev-matched downshifts. Remember when I mentioned muscle car credentials earlier? That was strictly referencing the engine, its prowess over undulating, curving backroads the stuff of mid-engine exotica. Just look at the meaty 305-section Pirelli P-Zero rubber at back and plentiful 265/35s up front, both ends supported by the lightweight aluminum chassis and riveted, bonded body shell noted earlier, and then factor in that suspension’s Adaptive Dynamics system, the electronic active rear differential, and the brake-sourced torque vectoring. Tap the carbon ceramic brakes to load up the front tires, enter the apex, add throttle and enjoy as the SVR’s backside locks into place while catapulting this leather-lined beast toward the next bend, a process I repeated over and over, as often as opportunity would allow. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR
New for 2019 is this large 10.0-inch infotainment touchscreen. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

All said, you’d think something as fabulously fast as the F-Type SVR would be a handful around town, but that’s where its exotic nature ends and more upright practicality enters. It’s actually a very comfortable coupe to spend time in, while visibility is quite good considering its sleek greenhouse and thick C pillars. The 12-way powered driver’s seat and steering column fit my long-legged, short torso five-foot-eight frame well, and due to much more movement in all directions should provide good adjustability for all sorts of body types, and I certainly had no complaints from my various co-drivers. 

On the practicality question, Jaguar provides a large hatch opening for loading in all kinds of gear, with up to 408 litres (14.4 cubic feet) in total and about half that below the removable hard cargo cover. It’s beautifully finished, as one would expect in this class, but remember that unlike the old XK the F-Type is strictly a two-seater with no rear seats to fold, so there’s no way you’ll be able to fit skis or any other long items aboard, unless you slot them down the middle between driver and front passenger. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR
All F-Type switchgear is above par. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

I remember stuffing my significant other and kids into an XKR coupe years ago, and while its 2+2 grand touring profile wasn’t carried forward into the F-Type’s design, the interior’s fine workmanship and beautiful attention to detail continues. In fact, I’d say this SVR’s cabin is even better, with rich red stitching and piping providing colour to the otherwise black Suedecloth and quilted leather surfaces, while its electronic interfaces are beyond comparison. 

Classic analogue dials flank a large 5.0-inch colour TFT multi-information display at centre, unchanged from past years, albeit the Touch Pro infotainment touchscreen on the centre stack is all new for 2019, growing from 8.0 to 10.0 inches in diameter and now flush-mounted without buttons down each side. It’s properly outfitted with navigation, a backup camera with active guidelines, Pro Services, InControl Apps, 770-watt 12- speaker Meridian surround audio, satellite and HD radio, and the list goes on, while Jaguar also added Apple CarPlay and Android Auto for $300. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR
Fabulous looking SVR sport seats are comfortable and supportive. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

You can get into a 2019 F-Type Coupe SVR for just $140,500, or go topless for an extra $3,000, either of which is a bargain when compared to the Porsche 911 Turbo that will set you back $43,700 more for the hardtop or an additional $54,700 for the drop-top. That easily pays for the aforementioned $13,260 Carbon Ceramic Brake Pack with plenty left over, which includes 398 millimetre rotors up front and 380 mm discs at back, plus massive yellow calipers encircled by a stunning set of 10-spoke 20-inch diamond-turned alloys. Plenty of options were included with my test car and a yet more, like LED headlights, a heated steering wheel, rain-sensing wipers, auto-dimming centre and side mirrors, auto climate control, front and rear parking sensors, autonomous emergency braking, and lane keeping assist, comes standard, so make sure to check out all the 2019 F-Type trims, packages and options at CarCostCanada, not to mention rebate info and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type Coupe SVR
A supercar that’s practical too. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

It’s difficult not to write an epic for such a phenomenal sports car, but instead of running on at the mouth I recommend you head to your local Jaguar retailer and ask them to start one up in the showroom or on the lot, turn on the switchable active exhaust, rev the throttle and then listen to the snap, crackle and pop of the exhaust. If you’re not raring to go for a drive after that, you might be better off moseying down the road to the Lexus store for a smooth, comfortable ride in ES 300 hybrid.

We’ve got the lovely Jaguar XF in our garage this week, and despite its elegantly classic sport sedan lines, beautifully deep, rich Rossello Red metallic paint, luxuriously appointed Ebony leather and…

2019 Jaguar XF S

2019 Jaguar XF S
The beautiful XF S fits its majestic background perfectly, and thankfully it’s in our garage this week. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

We’ve got the lovely Jaguar XF in our garage this week, and despite its elegantly classic sport sedan lines, beautifully deep, rich Rossello Red metallic paint, luxuriously appointed Ebony leather and Light Oyster grey contrast-stitched cabin with beautiful Grey Figured Ebony veneers, full assortment of standard and optional features, some of which are new for 2019, and the list goes on, it’s difficult to be 100 percent positive. 

The truth of the matter is, no matter how entertaining and informative I try to make this review out to be, you are one of a very small number of Canadian consumers showing any interest in this car at all. It’s partially a sign of the crossover SUV times, the success of Jaguar’s E-Pace and F-Pace plus interest in its new I-Pace EV verifying that, but to be totally honest, it’s also due to Jaguar’s declining fortunes overall. 

2019 Jaguar XF S
The XF S is long, low and lean, making a nicely proportioned mid-size statement. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

This is where I give kudos to Jaguar for sticking to its guns in the luxury car business, “car” being the key word I’m referring to in this respect. The brand grew legendary thanks to classics like the forever-beautiful Mk II and XJ Series I, II and III that followed, not to mention the B-Type, C-Type and E-Type sports cars that were the inspiration behind today’s fabulous F-Type, but times are tough for all but a few luxury sedans these days. 

Jaguar designers Ian Callum and Adam Hatton did a momentous job reinvigorating the XJ nameplate back in 2009, the first one I saw in the metal while descending the baggage claim escalator at Pearson International literally dropping my jaw in dumbfounded adoration, but that was a decade ago and as much as I still love that big, beautiful and surprisingly agile car the full-size luxury F-segment hasn’t exactly been twiddling its thumbs while waiting for Coventry to show us all something new. 

2019 Jaguar XF S
Lacking some distinctive character from the rear, at least when compared to the lovely Jaguar XJ, the XF’s backside is certainly tasteful. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

In the meantime, Jaguar introduced the Callum-designed compact D-segment XE in April of 2015 (a 2020 refresh was just revealed), designed to fight it out with the BMW 3 Series, Mercedes-Benz C-Class, Audi A4 and the like, plus the second version of its mid-size E-segment XF later that year, also penned by Mr. Callum—he does have a way with sculpted aluminum panels and composites. They’re all beautiful, more than capable of receiving compliments from true enthusiasts who appreciate special cars made by an even more endearing brand, but thumbs up and nods of appreciation from enthusiasts won’t pay the bills. 

As it is, Jaguar’s Canadian sales aren’t exactly on fire. Jaguar sold a grand total of 188 XJs in Canada last calendar year, representing 17.5 percent fewer than in 2017, while year-over-year XF sales were down a staggering 63.5 percent to just 173 units throughout all of 2018. The smallest XE was the only bright spot amongst Jag’s four-door sedan lineup with 571 sales and a downward trend of just 27.8 percent. 

2019 Jaguar XF S
That’s a powerful looking front fascia, backed up by 380-hp in top-line S trim. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Making matters worse, if it weren’t for the Alfa Romeo Giulia the just-noted XE would be dead last in its class, while the XF has the Acura RLX and Infiniti Q70 to thank for not bringing up the rear in the E-segment. On that happy note I’m glad to report my favourite XJ had a more respectable showing amongst its peers last year with the Audi A8, Maserati Quattroporte and Genesis G90 left far behind, but factoring in that Mercedes sells nearly five times as many S-Class models as XJs, and more than 20 times as many C-Class and E-Class variants than XEs and XFs, makes even this tiny positive a tad disconcerting. 

Year-over-year F-Type sales were down in 2018 too, but just by 4.8 percent to 373 units, causing the still gorgeous sports car to slip from fourth to fifth amongst its premium rivals (when including the Corvette), but take heart the F-Pace saw growth of 2.3 percent to 2,419 units last year, while the E-Pace found 572 new buyers despite only arriving on the scene in, um, February (of last year). 

2019 Jaguar XF S
Full LED headlamps boast auto high beams and more. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Yah, not quite the compact crossover SUV response Jaguar was hoping for. Interestingly, the new plug-in electric I-Pace might actually become the major league out-of-the-ballpark grand slam hit Jaguar’s been longing for, but we’ll have to wait and see as the 41 units they managed to sell toward the end of last year was hardly a sizeable enough sample to make judgement on. Overall, the 4,349 Jaguars sold in Canada throughout calendar year 2018 (the vast majority F-Paces) represented a 5.9-percent decline from the year before, and if it weren’t for the F-Pace, E-Pace, and an 11.5-percent gain experienced by Land Rover, resulting in JLRC growth of 5.7 percent overall, this wouldn’t be a positive story at all. 

2019 Jaguar XF S
This is one seriously sporty looking luxury sedan. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

To be fair the BMW brand only saw Canadian sales growth of 1.2 percent, Audi grew by just 2.5 percent, and Porsche by a pretty impressive 7.9 percent, while Mercedes-Benz sales actually fell by 4.8 percent. Last year’s biggest luxury brand success story goes to Volvo, mind you, but its amazing 29.8 percent growth is more representative of a phoenix rising from the ashes than anything resembling market dominance. Likewise, Alfa Romeo’s sales are up 26 percent thanks to its new Stelvio SUV, but with 1,402 total units (compared to Mercedes’ 49,413) it’s not causing many competitors concern. The same goes for Genesis, up 174.5 percent to 1,441 total cars sold (they don’t have any SUVs yet), but Tesla’s 386.4-percent year-over-year rise should cause brands like Jaguar to quake in their Doc Martins, if the California-based brand’s numbers can be trusted, and its completely unhinged, egomaniacal CEO doesn’t drive the “tech” company’s valuation underground one idiotic, questionably drug-induced “funding secured” tweet at a time. 

2019 Jaguar XF S
These glossy black twinned five-spoke alloys cost another $770 over the XF S trim’s standard 20-inch rims. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

So to make a short story long, the XF is Jaguar’s slowest selling vehicle in a market segment that’s also losing ground, which makes me (crossing my fingers) hopeful that we’ll be fortunate enough to lure in 10 percent of this model’s current ownership base (Jaguar sold 2,242 XFs over the past five years) for a total of 224 readers, plus another 100 or so interested lookie-loos, so that advertising can pay for our efforts (fat chance, I know). 

Of course, if we were to base our coverage on this type of business model I’d only be writing about full-size pickup trucks, plus a few compact sedans and crossover SUVs, so suffice to say the XF is worthy of much more attention than it’s currently receiving in this country, and no doubt Jaguar hopes that changes made to this 2019 model will help increase sales back to its 2013 levels at best (604 units), or 2017 levels at least (494). 

2019 Jaguar XF S
The XF’s narrow strips of wraparound LED taillights might best be described as tastefully understated. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

So without further ado, new for 2019 is Jaguar’s updated 10.0-inch InControl Touch Pro centre display that provides a lot more area to enjoy its oh-so-British red telephone booth in a field graphics and much easier to see backup camera… but wait… the backup camera is there, but where are the graphics? Hmmm. I suppose most would rather have a larger non-graphical touchscreen than something smaller and more interesting, and you’ll probably have your smartphone hooked up to Apple CarPlay or Android Auto anyway, which are now part of the package. Then again, those who’d rather set their navigation instructions via the InControl Touch Pro interface will appreciate that voice recognition has been added to the mix, both standard in the XF’s second-rung Prestige trim. 

2019 Jaguar XF S
The XF includes all of the premium sector’s requisite ingredients, but what about design, fit, finish, and quality? We’ll tell all in our upcoming road test. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Lastly, Jaguar’s luxurious Suedecloth is now standard for the roof pillars and headliner across the entire XF line, as is a set of aluminum treadplates with illuminated Jaguar branding, premium carpeted floor mats, metal-enhanced foot pedals, chromed power seat switchgear, plus a classy and classic looking frameless auto-dimming rearview mirror. 

Now that we’re talking XF trims, for 2019 they include the $59,100 Premium, $64,500 Prestige, and $67,800 R-Sport when choosing the 247 horsepower base 2.0-litre direct-injection turbocharged four-cylinder; $67,000 Prestige, $70,300 R-Sport, $72,300 300 SPORT and $79,100 Portfolio with the 296 horsepower version of the same gasoline-powered engine; $66,500 Prestige and $69,800 R-Sport with the 180 horsepower 2.0-litre four-cylinder diesel; and lastly $75,300 for my tester’s 380 horsepower 3.5-litre supercharged V6-powered model’s sole S trim. All prices, trims and standalone options can be found at CarCostCanada, incidentally, where you can also save thousands by learning about available rebates and otherwise hard to find dealer invoice pricing. 

2019 Jaguar XF S
It looks like an ideal performance driver’s cockpit, but how does it drive? (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Additionally, all XF sedans utilize an eight-speed electronic automatic transmission with Jaguar Sequential Shift manual mode, plus all-wheel drive, Jaguar Drive Control with Standard, Eco, Dynamic (sport), and Rain/Ice/Snow modes, and Torque Vectoring by Braking (TVBB), hill launch assist and more, while my XF S tester also included Adaptive Surface Response (AdSR) plus Configurable Dynamics and Adaptive Dynamics that let you choose personal engine, suspension, steering, and transmission settings. 

After this ultra-long-in-tooth intro I won’t bore you with too many more details about each and every trim level, other than to say it’s a mid-size E-segment Jaguar so all of these various XF grades are finished to a higher degree than anything in the mainstream volume mid-size class, but I’m not going to go so far as to say the XF is segment leading when it comes to fit, finish, materials quality, digital interfaces, features, roominess, etcetera. It’s very good in all of the above respects, however, and due to offering a wholly unique look and feel, plus a very different driving experience than any rival it deserves your attention. 

2019 Jaguar XF S
This fully digital gauge cluster provides a bevy of bright, colourful information. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

So let’s take a quick look at some of the features found on my specific XF S tester, such as its special “S” body kit boasting a sports front bumper, gloss black side sills and rear valance, plus a rear deck lid spoiler, 20-inch alloy wheels, 350-mm front brakes and red calipers all-round, while inside it receives special metal sill finishers with “S” branding, unique Dark Hex aluminum inlays on the instrument panel, a leather-like Luxtec-wrapped dash top, “S” embossed 18-way power-adjustable sport seats, and more. 

Other features not yet mentioned that are incorporated into the XF S include proximity-sensing access, pushbutton ignition, an acoustic layer windshield, automatic headlights, rain-sensing wipers, an electromechanical parking brake, a power-adjustable steering column, auto-dimming, power-folding, heatable side mirrors with approach lights and puddle lamps, memory for those mirrors as well as the front seats, front seat heaters, mood lighting, a Homelink garage door opener, a 10.0-inch capacitive touchscreen, a rearview camera, navigation with detailed mapping, InControl Apps, Pro Services, Bluetooth telephone connectivity and audio streaming, a USB charge port, dual-zone automatic climate control, a 40/20/40 split-folding rear seatback, front and rear parking sensors, and more. 

2019 Jaguar XF S
New 10-inch infotainment touchscreen is a big step up in size and functionality. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Additionally, along with all the expected active and passive safety features the XF S comes standard with autonomous emergency braking, lane keeping assist, blindspot monitoring, closing vehicle sensing, reverse traffic monitoring, driver condition monitoring, and more. 

On top of the all the XF S standard items, my tester featured $670 worth of gorgeous Rossello Red paint, a fabulous looking $770 set of glossy black twinned five-spoke alloys, a $460 Black package with a gloss black mesh grille and surround, gloss black side vents and the same treatment for the trunk garnish; a $2,200 Comfort and Convenience package with a hyperactive gesture control for that trunk’s powered deck lid (more on this in my upcoming review), as well as soft closing doors, three-way active ventilated front seats, and heatable rear outboard seats; a $1,030 Technology package with 12.3-inch digital gauge cluster, Pro Services, and a CD/DVD player; a $3,680 Driver Assistance package with a 360-degree surround camera, a forward facing camera, 360-degree Park Distance Control, Park Assist semi-autonomous self-parking, adaptive cruise control with Queue Assist, blindspot assist, and traffic sign recognition with an intelligent speed limiter; a head-up display for $1,330; a heated windshield and heated washer jets for $410; plus satellite and HD radio for $210. 

2019 Jaguar XF S
Comfortable and supportive? Come back for our full review to find out what we think… (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

All it was missing in order to be fully and completely loaded was a $2,230 Premium Interior Upgrade package featuring four-zone climate control with an air quality sensor and automatic air re-circulation, a lockable cooled glove box, manual side window sunshades, a powered rear sunshade, and configurable interior mood lighting; and optional interior décor trim (the carbon fibre would’ve been nice); yet even as is the base XF S model’s $75,300 asking price moves up $10,550 to $85,850, plus freight and fees of course (again, check out CarCostCanada for details). 

As good as all of this sounds, and the XF arguably delivers a lot of value for the money asked, we need to face the reality that Germany leads this category by a country mile for good reason (as does Tesla for different cult-like electrified reasons), and despite Jaguar investing quid by the whollops into the XF’s lightweight and ultra-rigid bonded and riveted aluminum body shell, which is arguably one of the most attractive in its class, and offering more engine options than the majority of rivals (albeit no longer a supercharged V8), it would need to perform barrel rolls on the spot if it really wanted to get noticed. 

I’ll cover all that’s good and my few gripes in an upcoming road test review, so until then enjoy our photo gallery above. Like I said, it’s a beautiful sedan that deserves a lot more interest than it gets, so thanks for giving it some of yours…

Most will agree that Jaguar’s F-Type is one of the most beautiful sports cars to come along in decades, and this sentiment would be reason enough to make it one of the most popular cars in its class,…

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible Road Test

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
Even in its most basic P300 trim, the Jaguar F-Type Convertible is gorgeous. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Most will agree that Jaguar’s F-Type is one of the most beautiful sports cars to come along in decades, and this sentiment would be reason enough to make it one of the most popular cars in its class, which it is. Yet there’s a lot more to the F-Type’s success than jaw-dropping bodywork, from its lightweight aluminum construction that aids performance, supported by a wide variety of potent powertrain options, to its high quality luxuriously appointed interior, there are few cars that come close to matching the F-Type’s styling, capability or value. 

Yes, it might seem strange to be talking value with respect to a near-exotic sports car, but the F-Type, already an excellent buy throughout its initial four years of availability, became an even better deal since Jaguar installed its new in-house Ingenium 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine under its long, elegant hood for the 2018 model year. While the formidable turbocharged and direct-injected engine makes a very healthy 296 horsepower and 295 lb-ft of torque, it provides a considerable economical edge over its V6- and V8-powered counterparts and all rivals, while a significantly reduced base price of $68,500 didn’t hurt matters either. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
The F-Type is almost entirely constructed of lightweight aluminum, making for an ultra-rigid body structure. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Last year’s starting point represented a $10k advantage over the F-Type’s previous base price, which resulted in a much more attainable point of entry and a whole new opportunity for Jaguar. In fact, the new F-Type P300 Coupe and Convertible instantly became prime 718 Cayman and Boxster competitors, whereas pricier more powerful F-Type trims, which include the 340 horsepower supercharged 3.0-litre V6 in base form, 380 horsepower supercharged 3.0-litre V6 with both base and R-Dynamic cars, 550 horsepower supercharged 5.0-litre V8 in R guise, and 575 horsepower version of the latter V8 in top-tier SVR trim for 2019, plus rear or all-wheel drive and six-speed manual or quick-shifting paddle-shift actuated eight-speed automatic transmissions, continue to fight it out with the Porsche 911 and others in the premium sports car segment, including plenty that cost hundreds of thousands more. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
These LED headlamps with LED signature lighting come standard. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

The car in question in this review, however, is the 2019 F-Type P300, which starts at $69,500 in Coupe form and $72,500 as a Convertible this year. With close to 300 horsepower of lightweight turbocharged four-cylinder cradled between the front struts it should provide more than enough performance for plenty of sports car enthusiasts, especially when considering that key competitors like Audi, Mercedes-Benz, BMW, and Alfa Romeo don’t offer anywhere near as much output from their entry-level four-cylinder sports models, with 220 horsepower for the TT, 241 for the SLC, 241 for the (2018) Z4, and 237 for the 4C, while F-Type P300 numbers line up right alongside Porsche’s dynamic duo that are good for 300 horsepower and 280 lb-ft of torque apiece. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
Jaguar offers a variety of optional alloy wheels, with these 20-inch rims on sticky Pirelli rubber particularly impressive. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

If you’re wondering whether the F-Type P300’s performance will match your need for speed, it can zip from zero to 100km/h in just 5.7 seconds before attaining a top speed of 250 km/h (155 mph), and it feels even quicker with Dynamic sport mode engaged and its available active sport exhaust turned on. Jaguar makes its eight-speed Quickshift automatic standard in this rear-wheel driven model, and the steering wheel paddle assisted gearbox delivers super-fast shift intervals that combine with the brilliantly agile chassis to produce a wonderfully engaging seat-of-the-pants driving experience. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
The triple-layer cloth roof provides excellent soundproofing, raises and lowers in just 12 seconds, and looks fabulous. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

The agile chassis just noted refers to a mostly aluminum suspension mounted to the bonded and riveted aluminum body structure noted at the beginning of this review, a lightweight and ultra-rigid construct that certainly isn’t the least expensive way to build a car, but results in satisfyingly capable handling no matter the corner the F-Type is being flung into. The stiffness of the monocoque allows Jaguar to dial out some of the suspension firmness that competitors are stuck with in order to manage similar cornering speeds, which allows this little two-seater to be as comfortable over uneven pavement as it’s enjoyable to drive fast. Specific to the P300, less mass over the front wheels from the mid-mounted four-cylinder aids steering ease and potential understeer, making this one of the best balanced sports cars I’ve driven in a very long time. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
Of course the F-Type’s slender taillights are filled with LEDs. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

My tester’s $2,550 optional Pirelli P-Zero ZR20s on glossy black split-spoke alloys certainly didn’t hurt matters, hooking up effortlessly after just that little bit of slip only a rear-wheel drivetrain can deliver when pushed hard through hairpins. What an absolute delight this car is. 

I love that it’s so quick when called up yet so effortlessly enjoyable to drive at all other times too. Even around town, where something more exotic can be downright tiresome, the F-Type is totally content to whisk driver and passenger away in quiet comfort. It helps that its interior is finished so nicely, with soft-touch high-grade synthetic or leather surfacing most everywhere that’s not covered in something even nicer, the cabin accented in elegant satin-finish aluminum and sporty red contrast stitching throughout. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
Myriad colours are available for upholstery and stitching, but this classic red on black motif is hard to beat. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

The Windsor leather covered driver’s seat is multi-adjustable and plenty supportive too, while the leather-wrapped multi-function sport steering wheel provided enough rake and reach to ideally fit my long-legged, short-torso five-foot-eight frame resulting in an ideal driving position that maximizes comfort and control. I’m sure larger, taller folk would fit in just fine as well, thanks to plenty of fore and aft travel plus ample headroom when the tri-layer Thinsulate filled fabric top is powered into place, a process that takes just 12 seconds at speeds of up to 50 km/h no matter whether raising or lowering. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
The F-Type truly deserves the word “cockpit” when describing its driving environment. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Doing the latter doesn’t infringe on trunk space, incidentally, which measures 200 litres (7.0 cubic feet) and is a bit awkward in layout. If you want more I’d recommend the F-Type Coupe that has one of the largest cargo compartments in the luxury sports car class at 308 litres (10.9 cu ft) with the cargo cover in place and 408 litres (14.4 cu ft) with it removed. 

Back in the driver’s seat, Jaguar provides a classic dual-dial analogue gauge cluster centered by a sizeable colour TFT multi-information display, which while not as advanced as some fully digital driver displays on the market is probably more appropriate for a sports car that focuses on performance. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
Full digital instrumentation can be nice, but these analogue dials suit a traditional sports car like the F-Type best. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

The big change for 2019 was the addition of a 10-inch Touch Pro infotainment display, which replaces the 8.0-inch centre touchscreen used previously. Its larger size makes for a more modern look, while it’s certainly easier to make out obstacles on the reverse camera. The larger screen benefits all functions, with the navigation system’s map more appealing and easier to pinch and swipe, and only the home menu’s quadrant of quick-access feature not making use of all the available space (a larger photo of the classic red British phone booth would be nice). 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
The multi-info display in the gauge cluster features a full list of useful functions. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

The standard audio system is from Meridian and makes 380 watts for very good sound quality, while additional standard features include pushbutton ignition, an electromechanical parking brake, automatic climate control, powered seats, and leather upholstery on the inside, plus 18-inch alloys, LED headlights with LED signature lighting, rear parking sensors, a powered retractable rear spoiler, and more on the outside. 

The Windsor leather and contrast stitching noted earlier came as part of a $2,250 interior upgrade package that improves the upholstery overtop special performance seats while finishing the top of the instrument panel, console and door trim in the same Windsor leather for a thoroughly luxurious experience, while my tester’s heated steering wheel and heated seat cushions come as part of a $1,530 Climate pack, with an extra $300 adding ventilated seats to the mix if you prefer, while Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration was added for an additional $300. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
This sizeable 10-inch touchscreen now comes standard. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Lastly, proximity-sensing keyless access made entering and exiting more convenient for $620, heatable auto-dimming side mirrors with memory made nighttime travel easier on the eyes for just $210, as did automatic high beams for oncoming traffic at $260, whereas blind spot assist might have definitely proved worthwhile at $500, as would front parking sensors at $290, while the aforementioned switchable active exhaust system was well worth the investment for another $260. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
This nicely decorated switch sets Dynamic sport mode. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Incidentally, all prices were sourced from CarCostCanada, where you’ll find pricing on trims, packages and individual options down to the minutest detail, plus otherwise hard to find manufacturer rebate information as well as dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands when negotiating your deal.

At the risk of this sports car review becoming terminally practical, the F-Type P300’s fuel economy is so good it deserves mention too, with both Coupe and as-tested Convertible achieving a claimed 10.2 L/100km in the city, 7.8 on the highway and 9.2 combined, which beats all Porsche 718 and 911 variants by a long shot, not to mention hybrid sports cars like Acura’s new NSX. 

2019 Jaguar F-Type P300 Convertible
These are the comfortable and supportive performance seats that come with the $2,250 interior upgrade package. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Of course, F-Type efficiency takes a back seat when moving up through the aforementioned trims, but the more potent V6 is still pretty reasonable at 11.9 L/100km city, 8.5 highway and 10.4 combined, at least when it’s mated to the automatic. This engine allows for a six-speed manual too, which isn’t quite as praiseworthy at 14.9, 9.8 and 12.6 respectively. 

Enough silliness, because we all know buyers in this class don’t care one iota about fuel economy despite all the effort that Jaguar puts into such regulatory concerns. The F-Type is really about titillating the five senses via near overwhelming visual stimulation when parked and endorphin releasing on-road acrobatics when active. Of course, 296 horsepower can’t excite to the same levels as 550 or 575, but this F-Type P300 is the perfect way to make each day more enjoyable without breaking the bank. It’s an affordable exotic that’s as worthy of the “Growler” emblem on its grille and wheel caps as the “Leaper” atop its rear deck lid.

Most of the “important” Jaguar F-Type news centered around two new trims for 2018, and despite the model year quickly coming to a close I was only able to test the fresh new turbocharged four-cylinder…

2018 Jaguar F-Type SVR Coupe Road Test

2018 Jaguar F-Type SVR Coupe
The already fabulous looking Jaguar F-Type SVR Coupe looks even more sensational in optional Velocity Blue with added carbon fibre trim. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Most of the “important” Jaguar F-Type news centered around two new trims for 2018, and despite the model year quickly coming to a close I was only able to test the fresh new turbocharged four-cylinder P300 base trim in 2019 guise, and never had opportunity to drive the special limited edition 400 Sport at all. 

It won’t be the first or last time I missed out on a new car, but I probably would’ve cried if I’d been forced to skip my test week in this stunning Velocity Blue painted F-Type SVR Coupe. First off, the colour is stunning and worth every one of its extra $4,590. My tester’s version was in a gloss finish, but Jaguar will make it matte for $9,690. 

That might sound like a lot for paint, but when you’ve already spent $139,500 plus freight and fees for a new 2018 F-Type SVR Coupe or $142,500 for the same model in Convertible form (see all prices, trims, features, dealer invoice pricing and rebate info at CarCostCanada), despite this being $2,500 more affordable now than last year’s equivalent SVR, not to mention an unfathomable $44,700 less than the Porsche 911 Turbo that still comes up short some 35 horsepower, what’s another $10k?

2018 Jaguar F-Type SVR Coupe
Yowza, that’s one hot looking car. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

No doubt the same reasoning gets used when choosing to swap out the standard composite front chin moulding, louvred hood vents, mirror caps, side fender vents, and rear diffuser venturi blade with CFRP by adding the $5,100 SVR Carbon Fibre Exterior Package (the carbon fibre rear wing is standard), or for that matter upgrading the already impressive standard brakes to the optional SVR Carbon Ceramic Brake Pack for $13,260, which uses a gorgeous set of 10-spoke 20-inch diamond-turned alloys with satin black pockets to frame massive 398-mm front and 380-mm back carbon ceramic rotors clamped down on by big yellow brake calipers. 

2018 Jaguar F-Type SVR Coupe
The LED headlamps are standard across the entire F-Type line, but the carbon fibre hood louvres aren’t. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Jaguar didn’t stop there either. I would’ve been quite happy with the stock interior that’s already more opulently attired than most premium-branded sports cars available in this class, yet they added a $2,810 Full Premium Leather Interior Pack with a gorgeous Reims blue double-stitched leather and Suedecloth-wrapped instrument panel and console, and the leather was of the highest quality and softest grade. 

Such could be said of the blue-stitched hides used for the steering wheel, centre console, armrests, plus the intricately quilted door panels and seats too, while Jaguar also included some sporty carbon fibre inlays to complement all the beautifully detailed aluminum trim inside. 

2018 Jaguar F-Type SVR Coupe
There’s no bad angle, while these optional 20-inch alloys framing carbon ceramic brakes are a feast for performance-focused eyes. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Some of these finishes are new for 2018, and come as part of a slight refresh that updated the steering wheel, air vent bezels, centre stack and door panels inside, not to mention exterior details like the front bumper, air intakes, lower fascia, plus standard LED headlamps and taillights. All the changes are positive, if only noticeable to true F-Type aficionados. 

Life with any F-Type is good, from the aforementioned P300 Coupe that starts at just $68,500 or $71,500 with the roof removed, to this supercar thrashing grand tourer. The SVR delivers a lot of wow factor, but compared to something that might be able to keep up, like the AMG-Mercedes GT or Lamborghini Huracán, it’s more visually subdued. This is made more evident in a subtler colour like Santorini Black, where if it weren’t for the quad of crackling exhaust pipes out back it might even be able to sneak past the authorities unnoticed. 

2018 Jaguar F-Type SVR Coupe
This carbon fibre rear wing is standard kit. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

The auditory ensemble is gearhead nirvana, even without pressing the amplification button on the centre console that pumps up the volume when getting hard on the throttle by opening bypass valves within the exhaust so spent gases can exit more freely. The lightweight two-mode titanium and Inconel (an austenitic nickel-chromium-based super-alloy) active exhaust system is exclusive to the SVR, and above 4,000 rpm it snaps, crackles and pops to the delight of driver, passenger and enthusiastic passersby. 

2018 Jaguar F-Type SVR Coupe
Snap, crackle and pop, the SVR’s standard two-mode titanium and Inconel active exhaust is exquisitely obnoxious. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Maybe it’s the sound, but the F-Type SVR feels even quicker at takeoff than Jaguar’s claimed three and a half-plus seconds. The big fat 305/30ZR20s do their duty, with wheel spin easily kept in check thanks to standard all-wheel drive. It’s rear-wheel biased if you prefer to get unruly, but you won’t be able to modulate the eight-speed ZF automatic’s clutch yourself, so you’ll be forced to nix traction control and work the steering wheel and throttle to will its tail end sideways. I prefer the steady and smooth approach that allows the SVR to hold its ground with uncanny resilience, Jaguar claiming more than a G of lateral grip on the skidpad. This lets you get hard on the go-pedal mid-corner and experience all of its 575 horses immediately, without hair-raising consequences. 

2018 Jaguar F-Type SVR Coupe
You won’t find a better interior until you move up into ultra-exotics. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

With a body made from riveted and bonded aluminum and equally lightweight and rigid chassis construction you’d think the F-Type would at least fit into the welterweight category, but its 1,705 kilos (3,759 lbs) means that it fights it out like a middleweight in comparison to the 1,595 kg (3,516-lb) 911 Turbo. Still, the steering provides good feedback and the SVR feels plenty agile when flung hard through fast-paced S-curves, almost rambunctiously nimble. It looks long and lean and therefore more like a highway cruiser, but its reasonably short 2,622-mm wheelbase means that turn-in is quick and reactive, while high-speed stability still feels grounded and composed. 

2018 Jaguar F-Type SVR Coupe
The well laid out cockpit combines good ergonomics for optimal comfort and control. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

The F-Type SVR is an easy car to drive too. Of course, any sports car approaching 600 horsepower requires respect, but the SVR doesn’t need subservient reverence when coaxing the most from its formidable performance in a quest for its nether regions. I certainly wasn’t able to find a point of no return even with its configurable Dynamic sport mode engaged, but then again I wasn’t forcing it beyond rationality and only defeated its electronic driving aids for testing. 

2018 Jaguar F-Type SVR Coupe
Sporty analogue gauges flank a standard 5.0-inch multi-information display. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Jaguar includes an adaptive suspension benefiting further from an electronic active differential with brake-induced torque vectoring, so when driven within the realms of reason the SVR was downright docile, responding to the subtlest of inputs with predictable precision. Likewise, driving around town wasn’t the type of chore such mundanities are in a low-slung exotic. In fact, the SVR needs no more concentration than any other F-Type, but glides through traffic easily while riding comfortably. 

The slimline sport seats are wonderfully cosseting too, while their door-mounted 12-way multi-adjustable controls featured memory settings that, when combined with side mirror presets and the ideal positioning of the powered steering column, provided an ease of daily use that was much appreciated. 

2018 Jaguar F-Type SVR Coupe
The redesigned centre stack was upgraded with carbon fibre inlays. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Other items worthy of note include the well-organized and feature-filled 10-inch InControl Touch Pro infotainment touchscreen, which even includes a GoPro ReRun app that videotapes your drive before overlaying it with performance data. This would be brilliant at the Nürburgring Nordschleife, let alone Calabogie. Of course, a backup camera with dynamic guidelines, navigation and other functions are included within the touchscreen too, while climate controls can be adjusted from a separate interface just below. 

2018 Jaguar F-Type SVR Coupe
Nothing particularly fancy, but the backup camera did its job well. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Jaguar might want to give its collective head a shake, but believe it or not dual-zone automatic climate control is optional, available as part of the Climate Package 2 upgrade that also includes heatable or cooled seats plus a heated windshield. Fortunately, the standard HVAC system is automatic and pollen filtered yet just single-zone, while additional standard features not yet mentioned include auto-dimming interior and side mirrors, the latter power-folding and heated as well, plus proximity access with pushbutton ignition, an electromechanical parking brake, rain-sensing wipers, a heatable steering wheel, front and rear parking sensors, 10-speaker 380-watt Meridian audio, satellite and HD radio, configurable ambient lighting, and more. 

2018 Jaguar F-Type SVR Coupe
Believe it or not, dual-zone auto HVAC is optional. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Standard Intelligent Start/Stop meant that even fuel economy was kept in check, although at 15.6 L/100km city, 10.4 highway and 13.3 combined it was hardly as miserly as the P300 that achieves a claimed 10.2, 7.8 and 9.2 respectively in both Coupe and Convertible guise. 

Of note, autonomous emergency braking, blindspot monitoring, closing vehicle sensing, reverse traffic detection, lane keeping assist, adaptive cruise control, a driver condition monitor and traffic sign recognition all require a modestly priced $870 Drive Pack, worth it just for the upgraded cruise control. 

2018 Jaguar F-Type SVR Coupe
The 12-way powered seats are comfortable and leatherwork commendable. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Likewise, auto high beams are a worthwhile upgrade at just $260, while I’d probably choose the $3,680 carbon fibre roof over the $1,230 fixed panoramic glass roof my tester included, just because I prefer the lightweight performance benefits and general appearance of gorgeous composite weave more than seeing sunshine or stars overhead. My tester’s powered liftgate was an extra $510 that I could do without too, as it’s a small, lightweight hatch that requires little effort and less time to open if left to its standard manual devices, and I’m sure the standard setup saves weight as well. 

2018 Jaguar F-Type SVR Coupe
This fixed panoramic glass roof is optional, as is a carbon fibre roof panel. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

I could babble on about standard features and options, but that would be boring and might deprive you the joy of Jaguar’s online configuration tool, so suffice to say you won’t feel shortchanged from the SVR’s standard kit, and can easily upgrade you personal ride with the many aforementioned items, as well as 770 watts and 12 surround speakers of superb Meridian sound, semi-autonomous self parking, a garage door opener, and more, plus colour options galore. 

2018 Jaguar F-Type SVR Coupe
Cargo capacity is 408 litres, but only about half that much resides under the hard cover. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

I’d take my F-Type SVR in Velocity Blue with a few of the changes noted earlier, although I’d hardly find time to complain if Jaguar conveniently forgot I had this one on loan for another week, month or year. If wishes were horses, beggars would ride, as the saying goes, and this journalist’s humble life was certainly made a lot more enjoyable thanks to this absolutely brilliant bit of British kit. I recommend the new F-Type SVR wholeheartedly, as both a performance icon and a great value proposition. It truly measures up in both respects and then some.

The all-new, all-electric 2018 Jaguar I-Pace is already getting rave reviews from the automotive press, and soon we should be seeing them silently whisking through better neighbourhoods across Canada. …

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400 Buyer’s Guide Overview

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
The 2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400, shown here in First Edition trim, promises shockingly quick performance from a 100-percent EV drivetrain. (Photo: Jaguar)

The all-new, all-electric 2018 Jaguar I-Pace is already getting rave reviews from the automotive press, and soon we should be seeing them silently whisking through better neighbourhoods across Canada. 

Part of the praise has been lauded on styling, the compact luxury crossover SUV benefiting from trademark Jaguar design cues currently in use by the new E-Pace sport utility, its larger F-Pace brother, and pretty well every other Jaguar within the iconic luxury brand’s lineup, including the beautiful F-Type sports car. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
Many I-Pace styling cues can be found on other Jaguar models, but some are completely unique. (Photo: Jaguar)

The new I-Pace arrives on the market as one of only two fully electric luxury crossover SUVs available, not to mention the sole compact luxury SUV to be sold without an internal combustion engine (ICE). Its only competitor is the slightly larger Tesla Model X, and both have the clear advantage of targeting the EV marketplace with crossover SUV body styles. This said Audi and Mercedes are preparing SUV EV challengers that could make life difficult for the upstart Jaguar, so it had better get up to speed while it can. 

Get up to speed it will, and quickly. Standstill to 100km/h takes a mere 4.8 seconds, which makes it the quickest of all Jaguar “Pace” models. The fastest new E-Pace R-Dynamic can manage zero to 100km/h in a spirited 6.4 seconds, while the F-Pace S is capable of the same feat in 5.5 seconds. Top speed is limited to 200 km/h (124 mph), but pegging one’s foot to the floor can seriously impinge on maximum EV range. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
The I-Pace is long, wide and roomy inside. (Photo: Jaguar)

Estimated EV range is a considerable 386 km (240 miles) when driven more modestly, which should allow most users multiple days without the need to recharge, as well as the ability to undertake short road trips. Of note, 386 km (240 miles) is also 5 km (3 miles) farther down the road than the base Tesla Model X 75D. 

As long as you go easy on the go-pedal while maximizing the use of regenerative braking when coasting downhill, and spending as little time as possible at highway speeds, such range would allow someone living in Vancouver to drive all the way to Whistler, tour around a bit, and then come back again with enough battery storage left over for running some errands when you return. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
With a zero to 100km/h sprint time of just 4.8 seconds, get ready to see the I-Pace’s backside more often than not. (Photo: Jaguar)

The new I-Pace houses a 90-kWh liquid-cooled battery in an aluminum casing within the floor’s structure, and requires just 40 minutes to fill from a fully drained state to 80-percent capacity when hooked up to a 100-kW DC quick charger. On a regular 240-volt Level 2 home charger you’ll need about 10 hours to achieve the same results, or slightly less than 13 hours (12.9) to fully top it up. Still, considering the range available, a single night of charging, or alternatively multiple nights during off-peak hours makes the I-Pace easy to live with. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
The I-Pace interior provides the best in genuine materials as well as state-of-the-art electronics. (Photo: Jaguar)

On the other hand, it’s quite possible you’ll appreciate I-Pace performance even more than its range if access to a charger isn’t an issue. As noted earlier, the British premium brand’s newest creation has no problem leaving the majority of stoplight drag racers far behind when red turns to green, this thanks to an electric motor at each axle resulting in the tarmac gripping traction of standard all-wheel drive, plus the accumulated output of 394 horsepower and 512 pound-feet of torque. 

Also in the I-Pace corner is the British automaker’s expertise in lightweight engineering, shown in a monocoque body shell comprised mostly of aluminum. This is nothing new for Jaguar, which makes all but one of its production models from the light yet rigid metal. Underpinning this is a totally unique EV architecture that embeds the aforementioned battery within the floor’s structure. This allowed for much more flexibility when it came designing the cab-forward cabin. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
Jaguar dubs the two infotainment touchscreen displays InControl Touch Pro Duo. (Photo: Jaguar)

To put the new I-Pace into a measured perspective within the Jaguar family, it starts out 287 millimetres (11.3 inches) longer than the E-Pace and 49 mm (2.0 inches) shorter than the F-Pace, with a wheelbase that’s 309 mm (12.2 inches) and 116 mm (4.6 inches) longer respectively, for much greater front and rear legroom than either. Additionally, the roof of the I-Pace is 84 mm (3.3 inches) lower than that on the E-Pace and nearly 86 mm (3.4 inches) down on the F-Pace, resulting in a sleeker, sportier profile. Added to this is much greater width for a sportier stance and more interior spaciousness side-to-side, the I-Pace some 155 mm (6.1 inches) wider than the E-Pace and 69 mm (2.7 inches) more so than the F-Pace. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
Jaguar supports the I-Pace’ superb performance with a well laid out driving environment. (Photo: Jaguar)

The unique layout allows for a cab-forward design featuring a windshield that reaches far over the front wheels, as well as a shorter more steeply raked hood, plus shorter front and rear overhangs, with each wheel pushed out as far to its corner as possible, resulting in much greater interior volume and a strong, athletic stance. 

With much of its weight down low, which reduces the centre of gravity, and benefiting from the lower roof height just mentioned, plus the increased wheelbase and more substantive track that comes from the greater width just noted as well, it’s no wonder the automotive press is glowing about I-Pace handling. The standard chassis rides upon an Active Air Suspension featuring auto-leveling as well as the ability to reduce the I-Pace’ drag by automatically lowering a half inch at highway speeds, which reportedly combines for an exceptionally good ride quality and handling compromise. Additionally, the I-Pace achieves ideal 50:50 weight distribution, so expect a particularly well-balanced EV. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV4002018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
This fully configurable 12.3-inch primary gauge cluster is standard. (Photo: Jaguar)

Jaguar’s driver-configurable continuously variable Adaptive Dynamics system is optional, which analyzes vertical wheel positions, vehicle acceleration, steering inputs, plus throttle and braking actuation before it automatically adjusts the suspension damping settings depending on your personal drive mode choice (Dynamic being sportiest), while Adaptive Surface Response is also available, this system harvesting info from myriad sensors in order to calculate approximate adhesion levels on low-grip surfaces, such as ice, before you even apply steering input, and then after making your turn it minimizes understeer and oversteer levels by controlling throttle and braking inputs. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
I-Pace infotainment appears graphically clean and sophisticated. (Photo: Jaguar)

Braking in mind, two levels of regenerative brakes come as part of the standard I-Pace package, with either its high or low settings providing different degrees of “engine braking” when lifting off the throttle. It’s in the nature of EVs to slow down when removing one’s foot from the accelerator pedal, but providing firmer automatic powertrain braking makes using the brake pedal less necessary, easing everyday driving and saving on brake maintenance plus otherwise expensive repair costs. 

While performance is a critical element with any new Jaguar model, anyone familiar with the brand will also appreciate its rich heritage in luxury. Following in this tradition the new I-Pace combines contemporary design with beautifully finished, authentic fabrics, leathers, metals and woods, as well as state-of-the-art digital interfaces. Depending on trim, contrast stitched padded leather covers the majority of surfaces that aren’t finished in standard metals or hardwoods. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
The floating centre stack houses a separate touchscreen for climate controls and more. (Photo: Jaguar)

Specifically, the four leather-covered cabin motifs include Ebony (black), Light Oyster (light grey), Mars Red (crimson), and Siena Tan (caramel/saddle), while light beige and black headliners are available in woven cloth or Suedecloth. Even the steering wheel rim can be had in Suedecloth or traditional leather, while decorative inlays, which highlight key areas on the instrument panel and doors, include Gloss Charcoal Ash veneer, a piano black lacquer Gloss Black, a patterned Monogram Aluminum, and Aluminum Weave Carbon Fibre. 

A head-up display, which projects key information onto the windscreen ahead of the driver, is optional, but get ready to be impressed because a fully configurable 12.3-inch primary gauge cluster is standard fare, as are two infotainment touchscreen displays that Jaguar dubs InControl Touch Pro Duo, the main top screen measuring 10 inches diagonally and second, a 5.5-inch display used primarily for the climate controls, fixed lower on the sloped centre console. Available voice activation comes via Amazon’s Alexa, which was designed to promote the use of hands-free interaction. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
Trim choices are generous and the quality of finishings reportedly superb. (Photo: Jaguar)

Latest tech in mind, I-Pace automatic climate control utilizes an artificial intelligence (AI) system that senses the number of occupants on board before adjusting the temperature, while the AI system is also capable of calculating remaining EV range based on climate control usage, weather conditions, topography, driving style, and traffic conditions. 

The heating and ventilation controls sit atop a centre console that slants up toward the main display upon two flying buttress-style supports that house controls for the gear selector and driving mode switchgear, this paying respect to a design theme used by Jaguar in its F-Type sports car and new E-Pace utility, although the overall look of the new climate control interface, which incorporates large dials that appear as if they’re floating on top of a digital background, is even more futuristic. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
I-Pace interior roominess is more like a mid-size SUV than anything compact. (Photo: Jaguar)

Follow that centre stack down to rearmost portion of the console and you’ll find 12.2 litres (0.43 cubic feet) of storage space under the centre armrest, its generous capacity due to the absence of a transmission tunnel, whereas the rear seating area incorporates trays for tablets and laptops, similar in concept to what Jaguar has long offered in its top-line XJ. 

A panoramic sunroof sheds light over both rows of occupants, with those in the rear having the option of another two automatic climate control zones for a total of four. Back passengers can also benefit from Jaguar’s “Click and Go” front seatback attachment system, which allows features such as display screens to be mounted quickly and easily, while plenty of cargo area add-ons help enhance load space functionality. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
The new I-Pace houses a 90-kWh liquid-cooled battery in an aluminum casing within the floor’s structure. (Photo: Jaguar)

That cargo area measures 656 litres (23.1 cubic feet), which makes it considerably larger than the E-Pace’s 577-litre (20.4 cubic-foot) rearmost compartment and similar to the F-Pace’s 685 litres (1,510 cubic feet) of usable luggage space when the rear seats are upright. The cargo area is finished as expected in the premium class, with high-grade carpets, chromed tie-down hooks, and 40/20/40 split-folding rear seatbacks that expand on its usability, the centre portion folding separately to allow a couple of rear passengers the benefit of window seats while longer items like skis are stowed down the middle. 

As far as trims go, Jaguar Canada is offering the I-Pace in S, SE, and HSE trims, plus a one-off First Edition that will only be available for the 2018 model year. Pricing for the base S model starts at $86,500 before provincial government incentive programs in Quebec and BC (Ontario no longer offers plug-in rebates), with some yet to be mentioned highlights from its long list of standard features including 18-inch 15-spoke alloy wheels, auto on/off LED headlights with automatic headlight levelling and follow me home lighting, LED taillights, heated side mirrors with approach lights, rain-sensing wipers, and more. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
The I-Pace comes standard with LED headlamps. (Photo: Jaguar)

Preset your desired temperature via electric cabin pre-conditioning ahead of climbing over the standard metal treadplates with Jaguar script and taking hold of the soft grain leather-wrapped sport steering wheel, at which point you’ll also find the aforementioned standard Interactive Driver Display, as well as an electromechanical parking brake, JaguarDrive Control mode selections, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a Homelink garage door opener, an always welcome sunglasses holder, a fixed panoramic sunroof, dual-zone automatic climate control, a rearview camera, voice control, Navigation Pro GPS, Bluetooth connectivity, a Meridian audio system, satellite and HD radio, six USB power points, eight-way semi-powered front seats, Luxtec upholstery, storage under the rear seats, and more. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
These 20-inch Technical Grey split-spoke alloy wheels are exclusive to the I-Pace First Edition. (Photo: Jaguar)

Standard advanced driver assistance systems including autonomous Emergency Braking, Lane Keep Assist, a Driver Condition Monitor, Traffic Sign Recognition, Rear Traffic Monitor, Clear Exit Monitor, and Park Assist semi-automated self parking, while the I-Pace is also filled with the usual types of active and passive safety equipment expected in this class. 

Options with the base S model include the Adaptive Dynamics, Configurable Dynamics and Adaptive Surface Response noted earlier, plus premium LED headlights with signature DRLs, fog lights, various alloy wheels measuring 18 to 22 inches in diameter, gloss black or carbon-fibre exterior trim, auto-dimming and power folding side mirrors with memory, a wearable Activity Key, a heatable steering wheel, heated front and rear seats, a head-up display, a 360-degree surround parking camera, four-zone climate control, a cooled glove box, configurable ambient lighting, cabin air ionization, Meridian surround sound audio, a powered liftgate, the same with keyless gesture control, as well as various metal, hardwood and woven carbon-fibre inlays, interior materials and colours, a cargo net, storage rails, a luggage retention kit, etcetera, while available advanced driver assistance features include Adaptive Cruise Control with Stop & Go, High-Speed Emergency Braking, Blind Spot Assist, Steering Assist, and more. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
Aerodynamic details help keep the I-Pace glued to the road at high speed. (Photo: Jaguar)

Moving up to $92,500 SE trim adds standard 20-inch alloy wheels, premium LED headlamps, auto-dimming power folding side mirrors, a powered tailgate, grained leather upholstery, and a Drive Pack consisting of Adaptive Cruise Control with Stop & Go, High-speed Emergency Braking, and Blind Spot Assist, while $96,500 HSE trim ups the ante with a different set of 20-inch alloy wheels, plus Windsor leather upholstery, Meridian surround sound audio, a powered gesture tailgate, and a Driver Assist Pack that adds the surround parking camera and steering assist to the SE’s Drive Pack. 

2018 Jaguar I-Pace EV400
This I-Pace First Edition, looking fabulous in exclusive Photon Red, is shown here breaking the Laguna Seca track record for EVs. (Photo: Jaguar)

A fully loaded I-Pace First Edition, like the one that just set a production EV lap record around California’s famed Laguna Seca racetrack, will set you back $103,500, but for that money you’ll get everything from the HSE as well as design details inspired by the stunning I-Pace Concept, including Photon Red exterior paint, 20-inch Technical Grey split-spoke alloy wheels, the choice of Ebony or Light Oyster interior colourways, an exclusive Suedecloth headliner, Gloss Charcoal Ash veneer inlays, unique First Edition branded floor mats, metal treadplates with First Edition logos, and more. 

If the new 2018 I-Pace sounds like your type of EV, make sure to contact your local Jaguar retailer to learn how you can put your name on one. It’s a very special electric crossover SUV from a brand that’s steeped in performance and luxury heritage, and therefore deserves your attention.