Few premium models mimic their mainstream volume branded donor platforms so closely as the QX60 does with the Nissan Pathfinder, and by that I’m not talking about exterior styling. Actually, Infiniti…

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory Road Test

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
Infiniti’s three-row mid-size QX60 moved into 2019 almost identical to its recent predecessors, except for a new trim naming convention. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Few premium models mimic their mainstream volume branded donor platforms so closely as the QX60 does with the Nissan Pathfinder, and by that I’m not talking about exterior styling. Actually, Infiniti does a pretty good job of separating the two at birth. The QX60 gets Infiniti’s trademark grille and snake eyes-like LED headlamps up front, plus its squiggly rear quarter window design, and its thinner, narrower wrap-around LED tail lamps, whereas the Pathfinder certainly looks more traditional SUV-like since its 2017 refresh. 

No, the most noticeable similarities are found inside, where the two SUVs are similar in design, layout, and general goodness. See how I did that? You probably thought I was going to say something negative, and while I’d like to see more differentiation between QX60 and Pathfinder cabins, they’re both very good at delivering what people want and need, the QX60 merely stepping things up when it comes to the quality and choice of materials, plus other refinements. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
Stylish from all angles, the QX60 looks especially nice with its top-line Sensory package. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

For instance, the QX60 dash top, instrument panel, glove box lid, lower console sides, and front door panels (from top to bottom) are made from high-quality soft-touch synthetics, whereas the Pathfinder leads its class for hard plastics, covering all of these areas except (strangely) for the front door panels that also get the pliable composite treatment all over. The QX60 takes these refinements into the back too, providing soft-touch rear door uppers, while hard shell plastic covers the Pathfinder’s inner doors. Infiniti even goes so far as to wrap all roof pillars in padded cloth, whereas Nissan doesn’t even cover the front pillars, like some close competitors do. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
The LED headlights and fogs come standard, but the stunning 20-inch alloys are part of the Sensory upgrade. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Of course, Infiniti adds some more obvious upgrades to the QX60 as well, such as real maple hardwood replacing the fake stuff, a higher grade of leather with intricate hourglass quilting on the seat inserts and contrasting piping around the edges, at least in my top line Sensory trimmed example, but the dated electronics are pretty well the same except for some digital branding, the primary gauge clusters identical except for Infiniti’s classic purple colouring inside the dials, plus the serrated metallic rims around their edges, this colour treatment carried over to the centre display as well, which incidentally is devoid of Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration, and while the buttons, knobs and switches that control these interfaces (and everything else) are mostly unique and nicer all-round, they’re laid out in more or less the same fashion. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
Elegant LED taillights are standard across the line. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Along with the rich hardwood and sumptuous leather upgrades, the $4,200 Sensory package adds three-way forced ventilation to the already heatable front seats, while the second-row outboard positions are now heated, and the third row gets a powered return to make loading cargo easier, while accessing the rear luggage area is more convenient thanks to a motion activated power liftgate. Back inside, everyone can enjoy the open airiness of a powered panoramic sunroof overhead, complete with powered sunshades, not to mention a 15-speaker surround-sound Bose audio system upgrade complete with 5.1-channel digital decoding, while they can also appreciate the Advanced Climate Control System (ACCS) that includes auto-recirculation, a plasmacluster air purifier and grape polyphenol filter. Last but not least, the Sensory package improves the QX60’s styling and handling with unique 15-spoke 20-inch alloy wheels on 235/55 all-season tires. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
The QX60’s interior is laid out similarly to its Nissan Pathfinder donor model, but it’s a lot more upscale inside. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Prerequisites for the new Sensory package are the equally new $5,000 Essential and $4,800 ProActive packages, the first including remote engine start, entry/exit assist for the driver’s seat and steering wheel, rain-sensing wipers, reverse tilt-down side mirrors, two-way power lumbar support for the driver’s seat, two-way driver’s memory with an Enhanced Intelligent Key, a 13-speaker Bose audio system, leather upholstery, Infiniti InTouch infotainment with navigation, lane guidance, and 3D building graphics, voice recognition, an Around View parking monitor with Moving Object Detection, front and rear parking sensors, SiriusXM Traffic, and more. 

The ProActive package adds auto-dimming side mirrors, high beam assist, full-speed range adaptive cruise control, distance control assist, active trace control, Lane Departure Warning (LDW) and Lane Departure Prevention (LDP), Blind Spot Intervention, backup collision intervention, front pre-crash seatbelts, and Infiniti’s exclusive Eco Pedal. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
It’s high time for a QX60 update, but everything is still logically place and mostly well made. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

All of this highfalutin gear gets added to a QX60 that’s already well equipped in renamed base Pure form, and competitively priced at $48,695, thanks to features such as auto on/off LED headlamps, LED daytime running lights, LED fog lamps, LED taillights, roof rails, power-folding side mirrors with integrated turn signals, proximity-sensing keyless access, pushbutton ignition, a heatable leather-wrapped steering wheel, a powered tilt and telescopic steering column, an eight-way power driver’s seat, a six-way power front passenger’s seat, an auto-dimming centre mirror, a HomeLink universal garage door opener, a (regular sized) powered moonroof, micro-filtered tri-zone automatic climate control, an 8.0-inch centre touchscreen with a backup camera, SMS/email display, satellite radio, three USB charging ports, a powered rear liftgate, Predictive Forward Collision Warning (PFCW), Forward Emergency Braking with Pedestrian Detection (PFEB), Blind Spot Warning (BSW), and more (see all 2019 and 2020 Infiniti QX60 pricing at CarCostCanada, with breakdowns of trims, packages and individual options, plus make sure to look for special manufacturer rebate info as well as dealer invoice prices that could save you thousands). 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
Classic analogue dials get filled with Infiniti’s hallmark purple/blue backlighting, while a sizeable multi-info display sits at centre. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Some of these features are available with the Pathfinder, incidentally, so it’s not like top-tier trims of the Nissan-badged utility are even remotely spartan, but Infiniti does go further as it should. Where it doesn’t seem to need much differentiation to remain popular is in mechanicals, where the two SUVs utilize the same 3.5-litre V6 and continuously variable transmission incorporating authentic feeling stepped gear ratios. It’s one of the best CVTs on the market, and perfectly suited to these models’ comfort-first focus, although all-wheel drive is standard with the QX60, unlike the Pathfinder that offers more basic front-wheel drive trims as well. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
The centre stack is well organized and filled with features, but it mimics the Pathfinder too closely. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

At 295 horsepower and 270 lb-ft of torque, the QX60’s direct-injection infused V6 also provides 11 more ponies and an identical 11 lb-ft of additional twist over the Pathfinder’s version of the engine, which makes for a bit more energy off the line and when passing on the highway, plus Infiniti massages the CVT with a manual mode in order to extract the most performance from those just-noted stepped gears, not to mention default (a best of all worlds compromise), Sport (that makes adjustments to the engine and transmission to enhance performance), Eco (that adjusts engine and transmission responses to improve fuel economy), and Snow (that controls engine output to reduce wheel spin) driving modes, whereas the Pathfinder pays respect to its more rugged styling by including an “i-4×4” selection on its rotating drive mode selector, this denoting Nissan’s Intelligent 4WD system lets you choose between 2WD, AUTO, and LOCK, the latter for getting out of deep snow, mud, sand, or other types of slippery situations. Nissan’s combination of drive settings is probably best off-road, not to mention its 7.0 inches of ground clearance versus 6.5, but Infiniti’s setup is automated more for slippery conditions and optimized further for pavement, which is where you’re more likely to be driving 99.9-percent of the time. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
While hardly the largest infotainment display in the class, its overhead camera is really helpful when parking. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

How do these differences affect fuel economy? The QX60 does very well with a claimed Transport Canada rating of 12.5 L/100km in the city, 9.0 on the highway and 10.9 combined, whereas a fully loaded AWD-equipped Pathfinder is good for an estimated 12.4 city, 9.2 highway and 11.0 combined; more or less the same. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
Beautifully finished genuine maple hardwood inlays add a lot of glamour to the QX60 Sensory interior. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The QX60 also rides on an identical fully independent suspension made up of front struts and a multi-link design in the rear, plus stabilizer bars and coil springs at both ends, but sameness aside it feels more substantive than its lower-priced alternative. It probably comes down to some of the aforementioned soft-touch surfaces quelling noise, vibration, and harshness levels, not that the Pathfinder I recently tested was particularly harsh. Additional sound deadening materials used where the eyes can’t see no doubt play a part as well, but whatever Infiniti did, the QX60 feels more upscale, effectively shielding occupants from the world outside. 

This makes its ride feel smoother and more comfortable too, and it very well could be due to suspension tuning, but if there’s a difference it’s very minor. Both are excellent when it comes to coddling occupants in suspension nirvana, no matter the road conditions, while the two SUVs are pretty decent at managing high-speed corners too, as long as you don’t get overzealous in your need to travel from A to B quickly. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
The special quilted leather Sensory upholstery is lovely, but the two-way lumbar support doesn’t cut it. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

A feature I would’ve liked to see Infiniti address more completely is lumbar support, the QX60’s two-way powered system identical to the Pathfinder’s, and not good enough for the luxury sector. They should have at least made a four-way system optional, because as it is you’ll either get sufficient pressure exactly where you need it on your lower back or not, the latter being the case for my five-foot-eight frame and particular pain. A four-way system allows upward and downward movement in order to satisfy all body types and conditions. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
The optional dual-pane rear panoramic sunroof adds a lot more light than just the standard one up front. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Other than this the driver’s seat is quite comfortable and should be large enough for most peoples’ requirements, while second-row seating is very accommodating thanks to plenty of room from side-to-side and the ability to slide each 60/40-split portion fore and aft as needed, plus a comfortable armrest with integrated cupholders in the middle. The third row isn’t the largest or smallest in the class, yet should be sufficient for all but large teens and adults. Better than size, access to that third row comes via Nissan/Infiniti’s innovative seat folding mechanism that lets you keep a child safety seat installed (without the child strapped in) while sliding it out of the way. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
The rear seats are very accommodating. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Speaking of this, the QX60 could use more child seat latches, particularly in the third row, but on the positive Nissan/Infiniti’s Rear Door Alert system is brilliant. It uses door sequence logic along with an instrument-panel message alert, plus multiple horn honks to remind its driver to check the rear seating area after parking and turning off the ignition. This is an important step towards eliminating child and pet injuries/death after being left behind to suffer in the summer heat of parked cars. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
The second row seats flip forward and slide out of the way for easy third-row access. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Cargo volume is good, with 447 litres (15.8 cubic feet) available behind the third row, this space made yet more functional thanks to a hidden compartment below the load floor that also houses a removable Bose subwoofer, while up to 1,155 litres (40.8 cubic feet) of gear-toting space can be created by dropping that 50/50-split third row downward via powered switches mounted on each cargo wall. Finally, the 60/40-split second-row seatbacks flip down completely flat via manual levers on their sides, providing a sizeable 2,166 litres (76.5 cubic feet) of maximum cargo volume. Some rivals offer automated second-row seats too, but this setup works well enough and the space provided is very generous. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
Not the largest in its class, but the QX60’s third row is still quite roomy. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

In the end the QX60 is showing its age, but being a bit older doesn’t necessarily mean it’s outdated. Yes, its instrument panel electronics could use a refresher and I’d like to see more visual separation from the lesser Pathfinder, but it looks good inside and out, is finished in high-quality materials, drives well, and offers seven-passenger luxury SUV buyers a lot of practicality for a very good price. This 2019 model is no different than the 2020 version arriving now, other than its previously noted packages transforming into four trim levels, plus a number of new option packages. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
No shortage of cargo space here. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

A complete redesign isn’t far away, however, said to be arriving next year as a 2021 model, but if you can’t wait that long this 2019 model, or the new 2020 version, are good choices that drive a hard bargain in the mid-size luxury SUV class, although I expect the upcoming 2021 QX60 to be improved enough not to need a discount.

The Infiniti Q50 has been one of few sport-luxury sedans that found continued success despite the unprecedented onslaught of crossover luxury SUVs, at least before Q1 of 2019. Last year, Canadian premium…

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition Road Test

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
With each new generation, Infiniti’s Q50 looks better and better. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The Infiniti Q50 has been one of few sport-luxury sedans that found continued success despite the unprecedented onslaught of crossover luxury SUVs, at least before Q1 of 2019. Last year, Canadian premium car shoppers said their unceremonious goodbyes to the BMW 3 Series, which saw its sales drop by 19.5 percent, and the Audi A4, that lost 20.3 percent, while Acura’s TLX, Cadillac’s ATS, and Jaguar’s XE gave up even more ground, but the Q50 actually grew its sales by 6.8 percent throughout 2018. 

Over the past few months, however, Q50 sales have gone off the deep end with a 36.3 percent downturn, and while this is no doubt cause for concern by the powers that be at the company’s Hong Kong headquarters, it’s still not as bad as BMW’s 3 that lost 37.7 percent compared to Q1 of 2018, and Audi’s A4 that’s seen 39.9 percent of deliveries taken off its order books. Even Mercedes-Benz’ mighty C-Class has fallen by 34.5 percent, while Lexus IS deliveries (which were down 10.9 percent in 2018) have now plummeted by 45.5 percent, and Jaguar XE sales are currently nose-diving by a staggering 78.1 percent (its sales were only off by 27.8 percent last year). 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The Q50 has a curvaceous body that looks especially nice from the rear. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

I suppose I should stop tapping away at the keys right now and point you to my review of the impressive new Infiniti QX50 compact luxury SUV instead, but in all seriousness, 2,576 Canadians purchased the Q50 sport-luxury sedan during 2018, plus an additional 517 over the first three months of 2019, so I can think of plenty of good reasons to continue writing this review. In fact, I find the Q50 one of the smartest choices in the compact luxury D-segment, even if this category isn’t exactly filled with optimism these days. 

As a bit of a backgrounder, Infiniti gave the Q50 a mid-cycle update for the 2018 model year, refreshing its grille, front fascia, headlamps, taillights, rear bumper design and more, so it continues forward into 2019 unchanged from a visual perspective, except for a new Canadian-exclusive “I-LINE” styling treatment that now comes standard with the renamed I-Line Red Sport 400 model. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
LED headlamps with LED daytime running lights come standard. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Infiniti chose the new I-Line nomenclature from the words “Inspired Line,” and just like eyeliner it blackens the grille surround similarly to last year’s gloss-black fog light bezels and diffuser-like rear bumper cap, while the spoiler on top of the trunk lid also gets an upgrade to high-gloss carbon-fibre, plus new “custom imported” glossy black 19-inch alloys trim out the lower regions. Possibly more important, I-Line trim helps to visually differentiate the sportiest 400-horsepower Q50 from lower trims within the lineup, an intelligent move when factoring in the $7,700 leap from the already fast 300 horsepower Q50 3.0T Sport. 

Of note, both 300 and 400 horsepower Q50 models utilize the same turbocharged 3.0-litre V6 engine, albeit with unique components and tuning. Engines in mind, an even bigger change for 2019 is the discontinuation of the Mercedes-Benz-sourced 2.0-litre turbocharged four-cylinder from the Canadian market, although it continues to make 208 horsepower in other world markets, including the U.S. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
With all the fine lower front fascia detailing, it would be a reasonable mistake to mistake this Signature Edition for one of the top-line Sport models. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Back here at home, both V6 engines use Infiniti’s advanced seven-speed automatic gearbox with manual shift mode and downshift rev-matching capability, the latter a rare and wonderfully fun enhancement to the Q50’s overall strong performance, while the Japanese luxury brand’s “Intelligent” rear-biased all-wheel drive also remains standard. 

Fuel efficiency has seen improvements since Infiniti replaced the naturally aspirated 3.7-litre V6 with the new 700-cc smaller turbocharged 3.0-litre engines, but now that the four-cylinder is no longer available the model’s base fuel economy, which measured 10.7 L/100km city, 8.6 highway and 9.7 combined last year, no longer sits amongst class leaders. Still, the new as-tested base 3.0-litre’s rating of 12.4 city, 8.7 highway and 10.8 combined remains competitive amongst six-cylinder rivals. 

Such practical elements covered, I should also point out that the 2019 Q50 now includes standard predictive forward collision warning and forward emergency braking, which certainly is a step in the right direction for helping the Q50 to eventually achieve an IIHS Top Safety Pick + rating. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
These 19-inch alloys are standard with Signature Edition and Sport trims. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

With the 2.0-litre four now gone for 2019, Q50 3.0T Luxe AWD trim replaces the Q50 2.0T Luxe AWD, with the base price commensurately moving up $5,000 to $44,995 plus destination and fees, which just happens to be last year’s entry price for the V6. The Q50 3.0T Signature Edition being reviewed here starts just a hair higher at $46,495, while the upper mid-range of the model lineup gets filled by the previously mentioned $48,495 Q50 3.0T Sport AWD, whereas the $56,195 I-Line Red Sport 400 ends up on the top spot. This said all trims are very affordable when factoring in everything that’s on offer. 

By the way, each price noted is available in detail, along with trim, package and option information, from CarCostCanada, where you can also source money saving manufacturer rebate info and otherwise difficult to get dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The badge on the back gives this “Signature Edition” away. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Although mentioning the word “base” a moment ago, nothing about Q50’s twin-turbocharged V6 is remotely basic. To be clear, no rival offers a 300-horsepower base engine, or the direct-injected mill’s near equally impressive 295 lb-ft of torque. I’ve sung praises about this talented V6 before, plus gone on ad nauseum with respect to the seven-speed automatic and all-wheel drive setup it’s mated to, so rather than pore too much attention on the numerous technological advancements that make this combo worthy of your full attention, I’ll lay down a more experiential tone. 

For starters, the base engine feels even quicker off the line than those figures suggest, although those 300 and 295 output numbers are hardly insignificant. It just has more full-throttle jump from standstill than the majority of similarly rated cars, this probably due to the engine’s twin-turbochargers delivering most of that twist from only 1,600 rpm all the way to 5,200 rpm, which is considerably sooner in the rev range than a normally aspirated mill would be capable of, with a wider torque band as well. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
All Q50s provide a very upscale, luxury experience inside. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Those turbos spin at speeds of up to 240,000 rpm, incidentally, a thought I just can’t get my brain to comprehend, especially considering their almost silent operation and complete reliability. Also worth mentioning, the mostly aluminum and therefore lightweight V6 has been on the Wards “10 Best Engines” winner list since it was created, just as its 3.7-litre and 3.5-litre predecessors were, so I’m not alone with my accolades. 

Push the “START/STOP ENGINE” button just next to the gauge cluster and it purrs into action, a subtle rasp from the dual exhaust noting that this is no four-banger. Flick the “DRIVE MODE” toggle switch on the lower centre console to “SPORT” instead of “STANDARD” (SNOW, ECO and PERSONAL modes are included too), pull the contrast-stitched leather-wrapped shifter rearward into “D” and then over slightly for manual mode, and prepare yourself to shift via the gear lever as steering wheel-mounted paddles are only available with the 3.0T Sport and I-Line Sport 400 trims. No issue here, as I’ve been shifting stick for longer than I care to say. Then again, I’d appreciate having paddle-shifters too, but obviously Infiniti sees the Luxe and Signature Edition as its luxury-focused models, in spite of their quick response to throttle input and dynamic handling. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The Q50 instrument panel is well made and filled with top-tier features. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

This Signature Edition wears the same standard 245/40R19 all-season run-flat performance rubber as the Sport model, but as it was my test car purposely featured winter M+S tires that without doubt impacted its lateral grip on dry sections of roadway. Just the same Infiniti didn’t go cheap on its winter tires, skinning the standard triple-five-spoke alloys in Pirelli Sottozero 3s, which showed such prowess through wet and snowy conditions that nothing nearing the likes of an SUV was at all necessary. In fact, it was so good at managing wet Left Coast snow that this Q50 quickly became my default ride for a very cold and soggy Vancouver week, while it was not only a great help in overcoming inclement weather, but its wonderfully reactive steering, wholly capable suspension, and smooth, comfortable ride made each stint behind the wheel a joy. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
No digital gauge cluster here, but the Q50’s analogue dials are easy to read in any light. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Of note, additional Signature Edition upgrades include the same performance-oriented exterior design details as found on the Sport, such as a sharp-edged glossy black lip front spoiler and similarly black fog light bezels, as well as a slightly less aggressive variation on the black and body-colour diffuser-infused rear bumper theme noted earlier, while each mid-range model also utilizes of an identical set of silver-painted 19-inch alloy rims, which is an improvement over base Luxe trim’s 18-inch alloy wheels and 225/50 all-season run-flat performance tires. 

Finally, both mid-range Q50 trims get silver “S” badges on each front fender, but oddly the Signature Edition includes a special rear deck spoiler just above its own scripted “Signature” badge, but the Sport model doesn’t get a spoiler at all, although it does receive a silver “S” insignia beside its Q50 badge. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The Q50’s standard dual stack of infotainment displays is easy to use and highly functional. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Slide inside and you’ll quickly see that Signature Edition and Sport trims also share identical Sport Type seats featuring driver’s power lumbar and powered torso bolsters, plus manual thigh extensions for both front seats. The driver’s seat was thoroughly comfortable and provided superb lateral support, which is always appreciated when slinging such a capable car through fast-paced curves. Additionally, the Signature Edition’s Kacchu aluminum decorative inlays mentioned earlier are also found in the Sport model, a bonus as they look fabulous and feel substantive. 

Almost every other feature not yet mentioned is shared between the base Q50 Luxe model and the Signature Edition, which means the Q50 Signature Edition receives standard automatic LED headlamps with LED daytime running lights, LED fog lights and front turn signals, LED brake lamps, aluminum “INFINITI” branded tread plates, proximity keyless access, pushbutton start/stop, Infiniti’s “InTuition” for storing climate, audio and driving preferences within each “Intelligent Key”, welcome lamps on the front outer door handles, rain-sensing wipers, an auto-dimming centre mirror, a universal remote for your garage, micro-filtered two-zone automatic climate control, an Infiniti InTouch dual-display infotainment system featuring a bright, high-resolution 8.0-inch upper monitor and an equally clear and colourful 7.0-inch lower touchscreen, a reverse camera, Bluetooth phone and audio streaming, decent sounding six-speaker AM/FM/CD/MP3/satellite audio with HD playback, RDS and speed-sensitive volume control, dual USB chargers, a heated steering wheel rim (that truly responds quickly), heatable front seats (almost heating up a fast), power front seats, a power glass sunroof, plus more. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The top monitor displays the navigation system, rearview camera and more. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Notably, along with the move up to the base V6 engine a variety of features that were previously optional now come standard, such as remote engine start, Infiniti’s precise InTouch route guidance/navigation system with lane guidance and 3D building graphics, the Infiniti InTouch Services suite of digital alerts and remote services, voice recognition for audio, SMS text messaging and vehicle info, power-adjustable lumbar for the driver, and 60/40-split rear seatbacks with a handy pass-through down the middle. 

Moving upward in trims from this Signature Edition, the only significant improvements to the previously noted Sport model are performance oriented, with upgrades including the steering wheel-mounted paddle shifters I spoke of before, a special sport-tuned dynamic digital suspension, and an identical set of sport brakes as found on the Red Sport 400, which incorporate four-piston front and two-piston rear calipers, while the two sportiest Q50 models also include an exclusive set of front seat-mounted side-impact airbags. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The bottom display is a touchscreen for accessing audio, climate and other functions. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Features in mind, items not available with this Signature Edition include optional electronic power steering with the Sport model, while Infiniti’s exclusive drive-by-wire Direct Adaptive Steering (DAS) system can be had with all trims except for the Signature Edition. The same can be said for the auto-leveling adaptive front lighting system (AFS) with high beam assist, the power-adjustable steering column with memory, the Around View Monitor (AVM) with Moving Object Detection (MOD), the top-line 16-speaker Bose Performance audio system featuring Centerpoint technology, front and rear parking sonar, adaptive cruise control with full speed range, distance control assist, blindspot monitoring, blindspot intervention, lane departure warning and prevention with active lane control, and backup collision intervention with rear cross-traffic alert. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
This elegant knurled metal rotating dial is for controlling the top display. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Some features that are not available with the Signature Edition, are optional with the Sport, and come standard with the Red Sport 400 include auto-dimming exterior mirrors with reverse link and memory, plus Infiniti’s advanced climate control system with auto-recirculation, Plasmacluster air purifier and grape polyphenol filter. 

This puts the Q50 Signature Edition in a unique value position, by including much of the Sport trim’s features yet limiting choices to colours, which are identical to the five provided for the Sport, including Liquid Platinum silver, Graphite Shadow grey, Black Obsidian, Majestic White, and the beautiful deep Iridium Blue coating my test car; as well as interior themes, which just like with Sport trim come in Graphite (black) and Stone (grey). By the way, the base model’s interior can also be had in Wheat (tan), while available dark-stained gloss maple hardwood gives off a more traditional luxury ambiance. Additionally, those who move up to sportier Q50 trims lose the option of base Pure White and optional Mocha Almond (brown metallic) exterior paint, but the base model doesn’t offer Iridium Blue, while Red Sport 400 customers have the option of Dynamic Sunstone Red. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The Q50’s seven-speed automatic is truly and advanced gearbox. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Features aside, all Q50 trims are finished to a very high level. My test model included stitched leather across the dash top, instrument panel, both sides of the lower console, and the upper two-thirds of each door panel, while the glove box lid boasts a high-quality soft composite too. The materials are superb as well, from that leather surfacing to the finely upholstered premium leather seats, to the gorgeous Kacchu aluminum inlays, the plentiful satin silver accents, and other surface areas, while all switchgear looks good with nice tightly spaced fitment, and feels substantial with proper luxury-level damping. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The Sport Style driver’s seat provides powered lumbar, torso bolsters, and manual thigh extensions. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The Q50 is quiet too, whether rushing around town or speeding down the freeway, while it’s ideally spacious for all occupants. Adding size and roominess to a given market segment has long been part of Infiniti’s value proposition, and in the case of the Q50 it comes close to mid-size proportions when compared to a number of D-segment competitors. This benefits larger folk more than someone measuring a mere five-foot eight like me, but my longer legs and shorter torso often make it difficult to set up a comfortable driving position in other cars. Not so with the Q50, which provides extensive reach from the tilt and telescopic steering column, which when combined with the multi-adjustable driver’s seat allowed for optimal comfort and control. Improving on that, the power-adjustable lumbar support ideally fit the small of my back, the powered side bolsters snuggly kept me in place during hard cornering, and the thigh support adjusters nicely cupped under my knees. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The rear seating area is roomy and comfortable. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

As usual, I took the opportunity to sit behind my preset driver’s seat to find out how roomy the rear quarters are, and am happy to report that the rear left-side seat provided approximately five inches in front of my knees, a lot of space for my big winter boots below the driver, plus ample room side-to-side, while I had about three inches above my head, meaning six-foot-plus passengers should fit in back just fine. Rear passengers are treated to accommodations that are just as nice as the front compartment, with features including a flip-down armrest with cupholders at centre, overhead reading lamps, plus a set of air vents on the back of the front centre console. 

Trunk volume should be amply sized for most owners too, but its 382 litres (13.5 cubic feet) isn’t as large as some others in this segment. I’d prefer the European-style 40/20/40 split-folding rear seatback configuration too, rather than the Q50’s 60/40 division, but the rear pass-through is probably large enough for two or three pairs of skis, which may work well enough depending if skiing is your thing, or whether or not you ever load in long cargo. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The Q50 provides plenty of passenger and cargo flexibility. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

No car is perfect, but honestly the Q50 competes very well in this class, and easily deserves your earnest attention. On top of its list of virtues is value, which is always an important consideration, while Infiniti also has a very good record of dependability, makes beautiful interiors, provides arguably attractive styling, and has long been the go-to Japanese brand for performance. In the end, Infiniti will no doubt be more than happy to sell you a QX50 crossover SUV if you need more cargo capacity, but those who want the better performance of a low-slung sport sedan will appreciate that this Q50 continues to serve such purposes. Either way, Infiniti has you covered.

The QX50 always provided strong performance and a nicely finished interior, at least comparative to its peers in its earlier years, but its outward design never stirred my senses. Not so for the completely…

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory Road Test Review

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
The all-new 2019 Infiniti QX50 is one great looking compact luxury SUV, especially in near top-tier Sensory trim. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The QX50 always provided strong performance and a nicely finished interior, at least comparative to its peers in its earlier years, but its outward design never stirred my senses. Not so for the completely redesigned 2019 QX50, however, as styling is now its number one asset, critical for making a good first impression. 

It seems like I’m not alone in my thinking, because year-over-year Canadian QX50 sales growth is already up 59 percent as of December 31, and it only arrived partway through 2018, while during the first two months of 2019 the new Infiniti found 113.7-percent more buyers than the previous generation lured in for January and February last year. 

Most should find this ground-up second-generation redesign pleasant to the eyes, thanks to a particularly eye-catching version of Infiniti’s double-arch grille situated under a long, elegantly shaped hood, and bookended by sharp, animal-like LED headlamps. It all hovers over a clean and sporty lower fascia that nicely ties the frontal design together for an overall design that should cause many more would-be buyers to pay attention. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
All of Infiniti’s now trademark design details are rolled up into one stylish crossover. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Likewise, there’s plenty of muscular sculpting to the side panels, these passing by a handsome chromed engine vent garnish on each upper front fender, plenty of additional chrome trim around the side windows, the rearmost of which curves with the brand’s distinctive reverse kink, while at back it’s equally attractive, particularly at the LED taillights, while, depending on trim, a variety of 19- to 20-inch alloys finish off the look. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
Front or back? Which side looks best to you? (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

As visually appealing as the new QX50 is, Canadian SUV buyers need a generous cargo hold of practicality to keep their attention, not to mention premium levels of interior build quality, the latest electronic interfaces, and, of course, performance that matches or exceeds the best in this class. To that end, the new QX50 mostly delivers. 

As noted a moment ago, performance made the previous QX50 stand out, particularly its rear-wheel drive-biased handling, although the compact luxury crossover’s standard 3.7-litre V6, advanced seven-speed automatic, and Intelligent all-wheel drive were nothing to sneeze at either. And just how the new model’s exterior styling changes everything about the way the new QX50 looks, it is now powered by a comparatively tiny 2.0-litre turbocharged four-cylinder engine, uses a continuously variable transmission (CVT) to send torque to all four wheels, and rolls on a new front-wheel drive-based chassis, or in other words the new SUV is completely different than the outgoing model, down to its very core. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
Infiniti has found an attractive and distinctive grille design, while many of its contemporaries are struggling to stand out. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The move from rear-wheel to front-wheel drive platform architectures is nothing new in this class due to interior packaging improvements with the latter, especially when it comes to rear seating and cargo capacity, but how does it impact the way the QX50 drives? On the positive, the new QX50 now provides a more comfortable ride. It floats smoothly over rough patches of pavement, bridge expansions, and other types of road irregularities, while it also benefits from a quieter cabin, partially due to using active engine mounts ahead of the seemingly better insulated firewall and an acoustic windshield plus acoustic side glass. The result is a more refined experience overall, which should bode well for meeting the wants and needs of most premium buyers, but then again those who previously chose the QX50 for its road-holding prowess may be a tad disappointed. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
Full LED headlights are standard, but the Sensory gets even nicer signature LEDs with cornering capability. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Let’s face it. The old 2008–2017 QX50 (and prior EX35) was based on the old G35/G37 (Q50) sport sedan, and it felt like it, whereas the latest version rides on the Nissan Altima and Murano’s front-wheel drive-biased platform architecture, which while sporting a fully independent front strut and rear multi-link suspension design, plus standard Active Trace Control which autonomously increases brake pressure mid-corner to maintain a given lane, doesn’t provide enough help to turn this comfortable family hauler into a canyon carver. 

In a nutshell the new QX50 is a bit less planted to the road at highway speeds, especially when pushing hard through corners with broken pavement, and doesn’t achieve the same level of confidence on the open freeway either. This is the trade-off when choosing a front-biased layout, and while Infiniti has gone far to exorcise as many understeering demons from within, there was no way they could’ve make it feel as hooked up as the outgoing version. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
The QX50 Sensory’s styling details really catch the eye. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

This said the new variable compression turbo engine is brilliant. It provides more immediate power from its small displacement than the majority of rivals’ base engines, despite measuring an identical 2.0 litres. How much more? Try 268 horsepower and 280 lb-ft of torque delivered to all four wheels, resulting in quite a bit more output than its entry-level compact luxury SUV market segment’s peers. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
These gorgeous deep-tinted 20-inch alloys come standard on Sensory and Autograph trims. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The top seller is now Mercedes-Benz’ GLC, which only provides 241 horsepower and 273 lb-ft of torque, while the second-place Audi Q5 is good for just 248 hp and 273 lb-ft (which are identical numbers to the Porsche Macan that uses the same engine). Likewise, the third-place BMW X3 is capable of 248 hp and 258 lb-ft of torque, while the QX50’s mill is considerably more potent than Lexus’ latest base NX that can only achieve 238 hp and 258 lb-ft, while Cadillac’s fresh new XT4 is rated at a comparatively wimpy 237 hp and 258 lb-ft. All said the new QX50 isn’t the quickest in the segment, with the recently revitalized Acura RDX capable of 272 hp and 280 lb-ft of torque, and Alfa Romeo’s Stelvio leading the segment’s base engine output with 280 hp and 306 lb-ft of torque (both are more fun to drive, too). Still, the Infiniti CUV’s output is more than respectable. 

In fact, WardsAuto just included the VC-Turbo as on of this year’s 10 Best Engines. The new engine design took Infiniti’s engineering department a full four years to develop, and features special connecting rods between its pistons and crankshaft that vary the compression of the fuel and air mixture, with less increasing power output when called upon, and more improving fuel-efficiency under lighter loads such as when cruising and coasting. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
These front fender vents add a touch of class to an already well executed design. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

I know all this tech talk can be a bit dry, but I’m more concerned that I lost your interest earlier in this review when mentioning that Infiniti swapped out its seven-speed auto for a CVT, being that CVT is usual a three-letter acronym that correctly describes an economical and smooth yet dull and boring technology. Fortunately, however, along with tackling the problem of ever-increasing carbon tax-induced gasoline prices the new transmission is actually a strong performer. It utilizes a completely new shift-by-wire design that features manual shift mode, steering wheel paddles, Downshift Rev Matching (that blips the throttle to match a given gear ratio with engine revs), plus dual transmission fluid coolers, resulting in a fairly conventional feeling transmission. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
Of course, LED taillights are standard across the line. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The CVT responds better than expected when flicking through its paddles too, and is plenty of fun to drive with Sport mode engaged. The VC-Turbo’s power comes on quickly, but this is where the faux stepped-gear CVT doesn’t quite measure up to its multi-speed automatic rivals, as it allows engine revs to remain too high for too long, thus interfering with performance, adding to noise, vibration and harshness levels, and ironically impinging on fuel-efficiency. 

If driven like most of us do when behind the wheel of a compact crossover SUV, however, it’s a wonderfully smooth and refined transmission that combines a high level of day-in and day-out performance with claimed fuel economy that’s 30 percent better than the outgoing model, now rated at 10.0 L/100km city, 7.8 highway and 9.0 combined, compared to 13.7 city, 9.8 highway and 11.9 combined. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
Climb into one of the nicer interiors in the compact luxury crossover SUV class. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

If you were to ask me for one key complaint, it’s Infiniti’s Eco Pedal that pushes rearward on the gas pedal (and therefore your right foot) in order to try and influence you not to press too hard. I find it terribly annoying, and therefore never turn Eco mode on when using an Infiniti vehicle, so therefore I end up losing out on all the other benefits that the brand’s Eco mode provides, like the best possible fuel economy just noted. I’m guessing that I’m not alone, so Infiniti would do well to allow its owners to turn off the Eco Pedal when Eco mode is engaged. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
Quality materials set the QX50 Sensory’s cabin apart. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Those who don’t mind its interference can choose that Eco mode, as well as all of the QX50’s other drive settings from a “D-MODE” inscribed, metal-adorned rocker switch atop the lower console, just behind a totally new electronic shift lever design. Smaller and shorter, although well crafted from satin-silver aluminum and contrast-stitched leather, the new shifter provides a more normal gear selection process than some others in this class, particularly Acura and Lincoln that are obsessed with buttons. The only button Infiniti uses is a small black one with a “P” label for selecting park. 

Just above the shift lever on a separate lower console section is an elegantly stylish knurled metal infotainment controller surrounded by high-quality buttons, while a volume knob on the centre stack provides nearly the same level of luxury detailing. There’s no shortage of aluminized metal trim throughout the rest of the cabin either, albeit tastefully applied so it’s not overbearing, with personal favourites being the edges of each power window switch and the gorgeous geometrically drilled Bose speaker grilles. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
Where are the fully programmable digital gauges? So far, only traditional analog dials and a large TFT MID are available. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

This brings up the quality and fitment of all buttons, knobs and switches, which are well damped, tightly fitted, and made from dense composites when not covered in metal, allowing the QX50 to meet the level of refinement delivered by the majority of its rivals, and exceed some. 

Additional niceties include beautiful open-pore natural maple hardwood inlays (a Sensory trim exclusive) and lush black ultrasuede (also exclusive to the Sensory), both used on the instrument panel, centre stack, lower console, front seat bolsters and door uppers front to back, while the two front and second set of roof pillars, plus the roofliner itself, were covered in the charcoal ultrasuede alone. Lastly, classy contrast-stitched leather was also generously applied throughout the interior, the QX50 Sensory’s cabin truly a cut above. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
The dual-display infotainment system is a step in the right direction, with high quality screens and good functionality. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

To be clear, the QX50 provides high-grade premium surfaces, along with nice metal and wood accents above the waist, even coating its glove box lid with soft-touch paint, but like many in this class Infiniti stops pampering at this mid-point, instead applying hard plastics to the lower dash, sides of the centre console, and lower door panels. It’s a cost cutting measure for sure, but some will say the harder composite provides durability, weight savings and even recyclability, yet this is the luxury class, so therefore I think Infiniti should be doing more to measure up to leaders like the aforementioned BMW X3, which applies soft-touch to more surfaces. Still, the QX50 interior is much nicer than some other peers, and should impress most who step inside. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
A best of both world’s scenario, the Sensory’s Around View parking monitor provides multiple views. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Of course, it’s best in near top-line $56,490 Sensory trim, or when equipped with the more bespoke $57,990 Autograph model’s upgrades. These two trims are mostly the same when it comes to features, but differ in the application of some interior colours and materials. For instance, both use luxury-grade semi-aniline leather upholstery, those sumptuous ultrasuede accents just noted, and real hardwood inlays, but the Sensory’s colour theme is charcoal black and the Autograph is a two-tone blue and white motif, while its leather seats get a rich diamond-quilted pattern (in white) and its side bolsters are highlighted with blue piping. It’s a look you’ll adore, and therefore need to acquire, or not, and fortunately Infiniti makes it optional so it’s only a dealmaker, not a deal-breaker. 

Other features found with both trims include two-way front passenger powered lumbar support, three-way cooled front seats, advanced climate control (with auto-recirculation, a Plasmacluster air purifier and a Grape Polyphenol Filter), extended interior ambient lighting, rear side window sunshades, a gesture-activated hands-free liftgate, and metal cargo area trim, while exterior upgrades include a sweet looking set of 20-inch dark tinted alloys on 255/45 all-season run-flat tires, plus really nice looking cube design LED high/low beam headlamps with adaptive cornering capability. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
The QX50’s new electronic shifter is a really upscale bit of advanced kit. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The two top-line models utilize many of the features found in lesser trims too, such as the $52,990 ProActive model’s auto high beams, dynamic cruise control (with full speed range and hold), distance control assist, lane departure warning, lane departure prevention, blindspot intervention, rear cross-traffic warning, backup collision intervention, steering assist, the ProPilot Assist semi-autonomous self-driving system (which gets very close to full autonomy while traveling on the highway), Infiniti’s exclusive steer-by-wire Direct Adaptive Steering system (a first for an Infiniti SUV) that’s very reactive to steering input (other trims use vehicle-speed-sensitive power steering), a head-up display unit, and a superb sounding 16-speaker Bose Premium Series audio system. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
Check the previous photo to see this infotainment controller’s knurled metal sides. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Additionally, a bevy of items get pulled up from $48,990 Essential trim, such as rain-sensing windshield wipers, front/rear parking sonar, reverse-tilt side mirrors, Infiniti’s excellent 360-degree Around View parking camera with moving object detection, very accurate navigation routing with a superbly detailed mapping system, three-zone auto climate control with controls for the rear passengers (upgraded from the two-zone automatic HVAC system found in lesser trims), a power tilt and telescoping steering column, and memory for that steering wheel column, plus the front seats and side mirrors. 

Lastly, $44,490 base Luxe trim provides LED fog lights, LED turn signal repeaters integrated within the side mirrors, LED tail lamps (the Luxe is also standard with LED low/high beam headlamps), chromed outer door handles, chromed tailpipe finishers, a remote engine starter, proximity keyless entry, pushbutton start/stop, the previously noted drive mode selector featuring standard, eco, sport, and personal settings, a panoramic glass sunroof with a powered sunshade, a power liftgate (without hands-free), predictive forward collision warning, forward emergency braking with pedestrian detection, blindspot warning, plus plenty more. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
These comfortable seats provide plenty of support. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

Of note, all 2019 QX50 pricing for trims, packages, and standalone options were sourced from CarCostCanada, which also provides money-saving manufacturer rebate info and otherwise difficult to find dealer invoice pricing that could help save you thousands. 

For many, the new QX50’s advanced electronic interfaces will be most important, and I must admit they certainly help modernize the look of the interior and the SUV’s overall functionality. First and foremost is the new InTouch twin-display infotainment setup on the centre stack, boasting a bright, clear and colourful high-resolution 8.0-inch monitor on the upper position, and a 7.0-inch touchscreen underneath, plus InTouch safety, security and convenience services, etcetera. I found this system mostly easy to use, with the top display, which provides navigation info, various views from the backup/surround camera system and more, controlled by the beautifully made rotating dial on the lower console mentioned earlier, and the lower one by tablet-like tap, swipe and pinch finger gestures. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
Rich semi-aniline leather and soft ultrasuede can be found all over the Sensory model’s cabin. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

As for the primary gauge package ahead of the driver, I was somewhat dismayed that Infiniti didn’t take this opportunity to introduce a fully digital cluster, as this is now expected in top-tier trims (VW is even doing so with its latest Tiguan), but the mostly analogue dials the automaker provided worked well enough, and the large colour multi-information display certainly wasn’t short on functionality, all of which were easily controlled by a nicely organized set of steering wheel switches. 

Looking upward, a new overhead console includes the usual reading lights, buttons for the sunroof, plus a wholly redesigned sunglasses holder that, surprise, surprise comes without an intrusive nosepiece so that all of my sunglasses fit inside without issue. Just why previous versions were made with a nosepiece that was too big to hold regular glasses in place is beyond my scope of understanding, but fortunately Infiniti has remedied this problem once and for all. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
This big panoramic sunroof is standard across the QX50 line. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The sunglasses holder isn’t the only improvement made to passenger and cargo roominess, with rear passengers now benefiting from significantly more legroom and headspace. Infiniti actually claims that the QX50’s rear seating area is larger than both Audi’s Q5 and BMW’s X3, while rear passengers can now slide their seats forward and rearward in order to increase legroom or alternatively add to available cargo space. 

Unsurprisingly the rear outboard positions were very comfortable, while I had about eight inches of space for my knees when the driver’s seat was preset for my five-foot-eight long-legged, short-torso, medium-build body. Additionally, there was plenty of room for my winter boots, albeit not much for tucking them under the driver’s seat. Speaking of narrow spaces, the compact QX50’s compromised width was made evident by the lack of inches to the door panel, but the outer armrest was comfortable and my shoulder never felt hemmed in. Adults in back might find the flip-down centre armrest on the low side, but it’s perfect for children, and it includes a slot for storing your smartphone plus a pair of cupholders. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
Rear seat roominess and comfort is excellent, but where are the heated rear onboard seats? (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

The previously noted rear climate controls are about as minimalist as such items go, only combining a digital watch-sized black and white LCD display with single red and blue buttons for adjusting the temperature. Infiniti adds a USB device charger and 12-volt socket too, but oddly rear seat warmers aren’t even on the QX50 menu. 

On the positive, cargo capacity has generously increased by 368 litres (13.0 cubic feet) to 895 (31.6 cu ft) behind the standard 60/40-split rear seats, but remember you can slide them forward for another 153 litres (5.5 cu ft), increasing total capacity behind the rear seatbacks to 1,048 litres (37.0 cu ft). A helpful lever on each sidewall folds the respective rear seat flat, opening up a maximum of 1,822 litres (64.3 cu ft) when both sides are lowered. The weakness to the QX50’s 60/40-configured seatback design becomes apparent when wanting to stow longer items such as skis down the middle when family or friends are coming along for the ride, because there’s no centre pass-through or best-possible 40/20/40-division for optimizing passengers and cargo flexibility. If a higher level of real-life practicality matters to you, the Europeans tend to do a better job. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
This handy lever drops the right-side rear seatback down. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

As is now expected in this class, the standard powered liftgate is programmable for height, a very important feature if your parking garage is lower than average, and even more so if pipes hang down further (been there done that). This said I kept bumping my forehead into the open hatch until finding time to reprogram it, not a fault of Infiniti, but something new owners may want to watch out for. All should be happy with the cargo area’s finishings, mind you, thanks to attractive aluminum sill guards and carpeting most everywhere, while the cargo floor can be removed to store smaller items in two shallow stowage bins, the most forward one also housing the Bose amplifier and subwoofer. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
The cargo compartment is nicely finished, but the 60/40-split rear seatbacks don’t measure up to others that offer a centre pass-through or an even more convenient 40/20/40 configuration. (Photo: Karen Tuggay)

After a week with Infiniti’s new QX50 I’d say the pros more than outweigh the cons, but you’ll need to decide this for yourself when testing. Its styling should be universally positive, and most will probably praise its upgraded interior and much improved electronics too, while its host of advanced driver assistance systems will no doubt be lauded as well. I found it roomy and comfortable, plus its driving position is excellent, important for extracting all of its straight-line performance and maximizing support when pushing it through the corners, but this new QX50 is built more for comfort than speed when compared to the outgoing one, which will probably be just fine for the majority of its buyers. 

I won’t go out on a limb to say it’s best in class, and honestly would truly be hard pressed to claim this about any rivals either, but you really should spend some quality time with this new model before purchasing anything else. In other words, the new QX50 is worthy of your close attention, because it just might fit your wants and needs ideally, and save you a few thousand in the process.

Infiniti gave its only relevant sedan a mid-cycle refresh last year, updating the Q50’s grille, front fascia, headlights, taillights, rear bumper and more, so 2019 doesn’t see any visual changes other…

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The Q50 Signature Edition combines the performance-oriented styling of Sport trim without all of the actual performance upgrades. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Infiniti gave its only relevant sedan a mid-cycle refresh last year, updating the Q50’s grille, front fascia, headlights, taillights, rear bumper and more, so 2019 doesn’t see any visual changes other than a new Canada-exclusive standard “I-LINE” cosmetic treatment specifically for the now renamed I-Line Red Sport 400 model.  

Just like eyeliner, the I-Line upgrade, which was actually derived from “Inspired Line,” blackens the grille surround in the same fashion as last year’s glossy black fog lamp bezels and diffuser-style rear bumper cap, while the rear deck lid spoiler gets upgraded to high-gloss carbon fibre and wheel wells are filled with a special “custom imported” glossy black finish set of 19-inch alloys. I-Line trim further helps to visually differentiate Infiniti’s sportiest 400-horsepower Q50 from lesser trims in the lineup, a smart move considering the $7,700 leap from the already quick 300 horsepower Q50 3.0T Sport AWD. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The Q50 delivers big on design no matter the angle being viewed. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Both 300 and 400 horsepower versions of the Q50 source their power from the same turbocharged 3.0-litre V6 engine in different states of tune, while the other big change for 2019 is the elimination of the Mercedes-Benz-sourced 2.0-litre four-cylinder that continues to make 208 horsepower in other markets where it’s still offered, like the U.S. 

All remaining trims utilize Infiniti’s seven-speed automatic transmission with manual shift mode and downshift rev matching, the latter a rarity in this class, while Infiniti’s “Intelligent” all-wheel drive system comes standard as well. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The lower front fascia, particularly around the fog lamp bezels, is a key visual differentiator between the base Q50 Luxe and the model’s sportier trims. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Keeping up with the Jones’s, 2019’s biggest Q50 addition is the inclusion of Predictive Forward Collision Warning (PFCW) and Forward Emergency Braking (FEB) as standard equipment, which means these critical accident avoidance systems are now part of the Luxe model, Luxe being the base trim level in the Q50’s recently revised grade structure. 

Without going into detail about each trim, the Q50 3.0T Luxe AWD starts at $44,995 plus freight and fees, and the model in our garage this week, the Q50 3.0T Signature Edition starts just a hair higher at $46,495, whereas the aforementioned Q50 3.0T Sport AWD enters the picture at $48,495, and newly revised I-Line Red Sport 400 starts at $56,195. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
Both Signature and Sport trims roll on these stunning silver-painted 19-inch alloy wheels on 245/40 all-season run-flat performance tires. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

With all of that out of the way, there’s nothing remotely base about the twin-turbo V6 behind the Q50’s trademark grille, thanks to the 300 horsepower noted a moment ago, and the direct-injected mill’s equally impressive 295 lb-ft of torque (well, almost equally impressive). I’ve waxed poetic about this engine before, and I’ll probably do so again in my upcoming review, not to mention go on at length about the seven-speed gearbox and “Intelligent” AWD system, that’s actually pretty smart. 

Some upgrades specific to our tester’s Signature Edition trim that you might find interesting include the exact same performance-oriented exterior styling details as the Sport, particularly the sharper gloss black lip spoiler and deeper black fog lamp bezels up front, and a less aggressive version of the black and body-colour diffuser-infused rear bumper mentioned earlier, while both models make use of the same more conventional silver-painted 19-inch alloy wheels on 245/40 all-season run-flat performance tires, an upgrade over the base Luxe model’s 18-inch rims on 225/50 all-season run-flat performance rubber. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
If you want to know if you’re following a Q50 Signature, look for its “Signature” below the right rear taillight. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Lastly, both trims get silver “S” badges on the front fenders, but strangely the Signature Edition gets a unique rear deck spoiler just above its own “Signature Edition” decklid badge, whereas the Sport makes do with no rear spoiler at all, although it gets a silver “S” badge next to its Q50 nomenclature. 

Signature Edition and Sport trims also feature the same Sport Type seats with driver-side powered lumbar support and powered torso bolsters, plus manual thigh extensions for both front occupants, while both models’ surrounding decorative inlays are finished in genuine Kacchu aluminum. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
Does the Q50’s cabin measure up to its D-segment peers? Check out the road test review to find out. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Pretty well every other feature is shared with the Q50 Luxe, which is why there’s only $1,500 separating the two trims, so along with all of the items above the Q50 Signature Edition includes standard auto on/off LED headlights with LED daytime running lights, LED fog lamps and front turn signals, LED brake lights, aluminum “INFINITI” branded kick plates, proximity-sensing keyless entry, pushbutton ignition, Infiniti’s “InTuition” for storing climate, audio and driving preferences within each “Intelligent Key”, welcome lights on the front exterior door handles, rain-sensing wipers, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a garage door opener, micro-filtered dual-zone auto climate control, Infiniti InTouch infotainment with 8.0-inch upper and 7.0-inch lower displays, a rearview camera, Bluetooth phone and streaming audio, six-speaker AM/FM/CD/MP3/satellite audio with HD playback, RDS and speed-sensitive volume, two USB ports, a heatable steering wheel, heated front seats, powered front seats, a powered moonroof, and more. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
Yes, that’s two centre displays at your service. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Of note, a number of features that were previously optional are now standard with the move up to the base V6 powerplant, including remote engine start, Infiniti InTouch navigation with lane guidance and 3D building graphics, the Infiniti InTouch Services suite of digital alerts and remote services, voice recognition for audio, SMS text and vehicle info, power-adjustable lumbar support for the driver, and 60/40 split-folding rear seatbacks with a centre pass-through. 

At the other end of the trim spectrum, the only real changes to previously noted Sport trim are actually performance oriented, such as steering wheel-mounted paddle shifters, a unique sport-tuned dynamic digital suspension, and identical sport brakes to the Red Sport 400, which boast four-piston front calipers and two-piston rear calipers, while the two sportiest trims also get exclusive front seat-mounted side-impact supplemental airbags. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The Q50’s primary gauge cluster is almost entirely analogue, but that will be a positive to those who appreciate a more traditional look. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Speaking of features not available with this Signature Edition, only Sport trim gets the option of electronic power steering, while Infiniti’s exclusive drive-by-wire Direct Adaptive Steering (DAS) system is available on all trims except for the Signature Edition, as is the auto-leveling adaptive front lighting system (AFS) with high beam assist, a power-adjustable steering column with memory, an Around View Monitor (AVM) with Moving Object Detection (MOD), premium 16-speaker Bose Performance audio with Centerpoint technology, front and rear parking sensors, Intelligent Cruise Control with full speed range (ICC), Distance Control Assist (DCA), Blind Spot Warning (BSW), Blind Spot Intervention (BSI), Lane Departure Warning (LDW), Lane Departure Prevention (LDP) with Active Lane Control, and Backup Collision Intervention (BCI) with Cross Traffic Alert (CTA). 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The top monitor is more of a multi-function display, whereas the bottom one is a capacitive touchscreen. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Features not available with the Signature Edition, optional with the Sport and standard with the Red Sport 400 include auto-dimming side mirrors with reverse link and memory, plus Infiniti’s Advanced Climate Control System with auto-recirculation, Plasmacluster air purifier and Grape Polyphenol Filter. 

All of this seems to place the Q50 Signature Edition in a unique value position, offering plenty of Sport trim features yet limiting its choice of options to colours, of which include the same five offered in Sport trim, and interior themes, which just like the Sport can be had in Graphite (black) and Stone (grey) interior motifs. By the way, the base model can be had with a Wheat (tan) interior, while dark-stained gloss maple hardwood provides a more traditional luxury ambiance, plus you’ll lose the option of Mocha Almond (brown metallic) paint when moving up into the sportier Q50 trims, but you gain Iridium Blue in both Signature Edition and Sport trims, whereas Red Sport 400 buyers get exclusive Dynamic Sunstone Red. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
What’s the Q50 Signature like from the driver’s seat? Come back for our road test review for all the details… (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Well that was a more comprehensive overview than I had planned, so I’d better show a tiny bit of restraint and call it quits for this garage piece until the full road test review gets published later. We’re still driving it after all, so make sure to browse through the gallery provided above, and remember that all of the prices quoted in this review can be found in detail, broken down into trims with packages and options, at CarCostCanada, along with important manufacturer rebate info and dealer invoice pricing (yes, the price they pay) that could save you thousands. Check them out and be sure to come back here soon for the review…

Infiniti showed up at last month’s Salon International de l’Auto de Montréal with a new Canada-exclusive “I-LINE” trim upgrade for the sportiest versions of its popular Q50 luxury sedan and Q60…

Infiniti introduces new Canada-exclusive Q50 and Q60 I-Line Red Sport 400 models

2019 Infiniti Q60 I-Line Red Sport 400
Infiniti has refreshed its 2019 Q50 and Q60 (shown) Red Sport 400 models with new more aggressive I-Line upgrades this month. (Photo: Infiniti)

Infiniti showed up at last month’s Salon International de l’Auto de Montréal with a new Canada-exclusive “I-LINE” trim upgrade for the sportiest versions of its popular Q50 luxury sedan and Q60 sports coupe. 

Specifically, Infiniti is in the process of replacing the Q50 and Q60 Red Sport 400 models available last year and earlier this year with the new Q50 I-Line Red Sport 400 and Q60 I-Line Red Sport 400, which means that buyers spending the $7,700 needed to move up from the 300 horsepower Q50 3.0T Sport AWD, or $9,500 to do the same from the Q60 3.0T Sport AWD, to get into one of the 400 horsepower I-Line Red Sport 400 models, now get more visual bang for their buck.  

2019 Infiniti Q50 I-Line Red Sport 400
Updated Q50 (shown) and Q60 I-Line Red Sport 400 models feature sportier glossy black 19-inch alloys. (Photo: Infiniti)

I-Line, which Infiniti says was derived from “Inspired Line,” blackens both models’ grille surrounds so that they more closely tie in with the glossy black fog lamp bezels and diffuser-style rear bumpers found on the outgoing Red Sport 400 cars, while the rear deck lid spoiler has been upgraded to high-gloss carbon fibre, and wheel wells are now filled with a special “custom imported” glossy black finish set of 19-inch alloys. 

These changes make both I-Line Red Sport 400 models appear as if they have larger more imposing grilles, while the black alloys go further toward creating a more powerful, menacing look. The outgoing Red Sport 400 cars already featured glossy black rear deck lid spoilers, but replacing these composite lip spoilers with more sophisticated carbon fibre ones helps to elevate the two cars into BMW M and Mercedes-Benz AMG territory, befitting of performance models making 400 horsepower apiece. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 I-Line Red Sport 400
Along with the gloss black trim used for the outgoing Red Sport 400 models, a new glossy black grille surround adds menacing presence. (Photo: Infiniti)

Behind all that thrust is a twin-turbocharged, direct-injection 3.0-litre V6 that also produces 350 lb-ft of maximum torque from just 1,600 rpm, which is connected to Infiniti’s “Intelligent” all-wheel drivetrain via an advanced in-house produced seven-speed automatic transmission featuring manual shift mode and downshift rev matching, the latter function rare in this segment. 

“We are delighted to showcase the I-LINE editions which have been created with a vision to be further developed into an INFINITI Canada sub-brand,” says Adam Paterson, managing director of INFINITI Canada. “We are building on the Q50 and Q60’s award-winning engine and engineering excellence, to add even more eminent style.” 

2019 Infiniti Q50 I-Line Red Sport 400
This carbon fibre rear deck lid spoiler adds a level of sophistication that befits a car producing 400 hp. (Photo: Infiniti)

Pricing for the 2019 Q50 I-Line Red Sport 400 sport sedan starts at $56,195, while the 2019 Q60 I-Line Red Sport 400 sports coupe can be had for $65,295. Both models, which are available across Canada this month, can be fully configured at CarCostCanada, with full pricing of trims, packages and individual options available, plus otherwise hard to find manufacturer rebate info and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands. 

Also, take note that many Canadian Infiniti retailers will still have outgoing 2019 Q50 and Q60 Red Sport 400 models available, which they’ll probably be more than willing to sharpen their pencils on in order to make a deal.