Infiniti gave its only relevant sedan a mid-cycle refresh last year, updating the Q50’s grille, front fascia, headlights, taillights, rear bumper and more, so 2019 doesn’t see any visual changes other…

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The Q50 Signature Edition combines the performance-oriented styling of Sport trim without all of the actual performance upgrades. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Infiniti gave its only relevant sedan a mid-cycle refresh last year, updating the Q50’s grille, front fascia, headlights, taillights, rear bumper and more, so 2019 doesn’t see any visual changes other than a new Canada-exclusive standard “I-LINE” cosmetic treatment specifically for the now renamed I-Line Red Sport 400 model.  

Just like eyeliner, the I-Line upgrade, which was actually derived from “Inspired Line,” blackens the grille surround in the same fashion as last year’s glossy black fog lamp bezels and diffuser-style rear bumper cap, while the rear deck lid spoiler gets upgraded to high-gloss carbon fibre and wheel wells are filled with a special “custom imported” glossy black finish set of 19-inch alloys. I-Line trim further helps to visually differentiate Infiniti’s sportiest 400-horsepower Q50 from lesser trims in the lineup, a smart move considering the $7,700 leap from the already quick 300 horsepower Q50 3.0T Sport AWD. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The Q50 delivers big on design no matter the angle being viewed. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Both 300 and 400 horsepower versions of the Q50 source their power from the same turbocharged 3.0-litre V6 engine in different states of tune, while the other big change for 2019 is the elimination of the Mercedes-Benz-sourced 2.0-litre four-cylinder that continues to make 208 horsepower in other markets where it’s still offered, like the U.S. 

All remaining trims utilize Infiniti’s seven-speed automatic transmission with manual shift mode and downshift rev matching, the latter a rarity in this class, while Infiniti’s “Intelligent” all-wheel drive system comes standard as well. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The lower front fascia, particularly around the fog lamp bezels, is a key visual differentiator between the base Q50 Luxe and the model’s sportier trims. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Keeping up with the Jones’s, 2019’s biggest Q50 addition is the inclusion of Predictive Forward Collision Warning (PFCW) and Forward Emergency Braking (FEB) as standard equipment, which means these critical accident avoidance systems are now part of the Luxe model, Luxe being the base trim level in the Q50’s recently revised grade structure. 

Without going into detail about each trim, the Q50 3.0T Luxe AWD starts at $44,995 plus freight and fees, and the model in our garage this week, the Q50 3.0T Signature Edition starts just a hair higher at $46,495, whereas the aforementioned Q50 3.0T Sport AWD enters the picture at $48,495, and newly revised I-Line Red Sport 400 starts at $56,195. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
Both Signature and Sport trims roll on these stunning silver-painted 19-inch alloy wheels on 245/40 all-season run-flat performance tires. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

With all of that out of the way, there’s nothing remotely base about the twin-turbo V6 behind the Q50’s trademark grille, thanks to the 300 horsepower noted a moment ago, and the direct-injected mill’s equally impressive 295 lb-ft of torque (well, almost equally impressive). I’ve waxed poetic about this engine before, and I’ll probably do so again in my upcoming review, not to mention go on at length about the seven-speed gearbox and “Intelligent” AWD system, that’s actually pretty smart. 

Some upgrades specific to our tester’s Signature Edition trim that you might find interesting include the exact same performance-oriented exterior styling details as the Sport, particularly the sharper gloss black lip spoiler and deeper black fog lamp bezels up front, and a less aggressive version of the black and body-colour diffuser-infused rear bumper mentioned earlier, while both models make use of the same more conventional silver-painted 19-inch alloy wheels on 245/40 all-season run-flat performance tires, an upgrade over the base Luxe model’s 18-inch rims on 225/50 all-season run-flat performance rubber. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
If you want to know if you’re following a Q50 Signature, look for its “Signature” below the right rear taillight. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Lastly, both trims get silver “S” badges on the front fenders, but strangely the Signature Edition gets a unique rear deck spoiler just above its own “Signature Edition” decklid badge, whereas the Sport makes do with no rear spoiler at all, although it gets a silver “S” badge next to its Q50 nomenclature. 

Signature Edition and Sport trims also feature the same Sport Type seats with driver-side powered lumbar support and powered torso bolsters, plus manual thigh extensions for both front occupants, while both models’ surrounding decorative inlays are finished in genuine Kacchu aluminum. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
Does the Q50’s cabin measure up to its D-segment peers? Check out the road test review to find out. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Pretty well every other feature is shared with the Q50 Luxe, which is why there’s only $1,500 separating the two trims, so along with all of the items above the Q50 Signature Edition includes standard auto on/off LED headlights with LED daytime running lights, LED fog lamps and front turn signals, LED brake lights, aluminum “INFINITI” branded kick plates, proximity-sensing keyless entry, pushbutton ignition, Infiniti’s “InTuition” for storing climate, audio and driving preferences within each “Intelligent Key”, welcome lights on the front exterior door handles, rain-sensing wipers, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a garage door opener, micro-filtered dual-zone auto climate control, Infiniti InTouch infotainment with 8.0-inch upper and 7.0-inch lower displays, a rearview camera, Bluetooth phone and streaming audio, six-speaker AM/FM/CD/MP3/satellite audio with HD playback, RDS and speed-sensitive volume, two USB ports, a heatable steering wheel, heated front seats, powered front seats, a powered moonroof, and more. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
Yes, that’s two centre displays at your service. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Of note, a number of features that were previously optional are now standard with the move up to the base V6 powerplant, including remote engine start, Infiniti InTouch navigation with lane guidance and 3D building graphics, the Infiniti InTouch Services suite of digital alerts and remote services, voice recognition for audio, SMS text and vehicle info, power-adjustable lumbar support for the driver, and 60/40 split-folding rear seatbacks with a centre pass-through. 

At the other end of the trim spectrum, the only real changes to previously noted Sport trim are actually performance oriented, such as steering wheel-mounted paddle shifters, a unique sport-tuned dynamic digital suspension, and identical sport brakes to the Red Sport 400, which boast four-piston front calipers and two-piston rear calipers, while the two sportiest trims also get exclusive front seat-mounted side-impact supplemental airbags. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The Q50’s primary gauge cluster is almost entirely analogue, but that will be a positive to those who appreciate a more traditional look. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Speaking of features not available with this Signature Edition, only Sport trim gets the option of electronic power steering, while Infiniti’s exclusive drive-by-wire Direct Adaptive Steering (DAS) system is available on all trims except for the Signature Edition, as is the auto-leveling adaptive front lighting system (AFS) with high beam assist, a power-adjustable steering column with memory, an Around View Monitor (AVM) with Moving Object Detection (MOD), premium 16-speaker Bose Performance audio with Centerpoint technology, front and rear parking sensors, Intelligent Cruise Control with full speed range (ICC), Distance Control Assist (DCA), Blind Spot Warning (BSW), Blind Spot Intervention (BSI), Lane Departure Warning (LDW), Lane Departure Prevention (LDP) with Active Lane Control, and Backup Collision Intervention (BCI) with Cross Traffic Alert (CTA). 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
The top monitor is more of a multi-function display, whereas the bottom one is a capacitive touchscreen. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Features not available with the Signature Edition, optional with the Sport and standard with the Red Sport 400 include auto-dimming side mirrors with reverse link and memory, plus Infiniti’s Advanced Climate Control System with auto-recirculation, Plasmacluster air purifier and Grape Polyphenol Filter. 

All of this seems to place the Q50 Signature Edition in a unique value position, offering plenty of Sport trim features yet limiting its choice of options to colours, of which include the same five offered in Sport trim, and interior themes, which just like the Sport can be had in Graphite (black) and Stone (grey) interior motifs. By the way, the base model can be had with a Wheat (tan) interior, while dark-stained gloss maple hardwood provides a more traditional luxury ambiance, plus you’ll lose the option of Mocha Almond (brown metallic) paint when moving up into the sportier Q50 trims, but you gain Iridium Blue in both Signature Edition and Sport trims, whereas Red Sport 400 buyers get exclusive Dynamic Sunstone Red. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 Signature Edition
What’s the Q50 Signature like from the driver’s seat? Come back for our road test review for all the details… (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Well that was a more comprehensive overview than I had planned, so I’d better show a tiny bit of restraint and call it quits for this garage piece until the full road test review gets published later. We’re still driving it after all, so make sure to browse through the gallery provided above, and remember that all of the prices quoted in this review can be found in detail, broken down into trims with packages and options, at CarCostCanada, along with important manufacturer rebate info and dealer invoice pricing (yes, the price they pay) that could save you thousands. Check them out and be sure to come back here soon for the review…

Infiniti showed up at last month’s Salon International de l’Auto de Montréal with a new Canada-exclusive “I-LINE” trim upgrade for the sportiest versions of its popular Q50 luxury sedan and Q60…

Infiniti introduces new Canada-exclusive Q50 and Q60 I-Line Red Sport 400 models

2019 Infiniti Q60 I-Line Red Sport 400
Infiniti has refreshed its 2019 Q50 and Q60 (shown) Red Sport 400 models with new more aggressive I-Line upgrades this month. (Photo: Infiniti)

Infiniti showed up at last month’s Salon International de l’Auto de Montréal with a new Canada-exclusive “I-LINE” trim upgrade for the sportiest versions of its popular Q50 luxury sedan and Q60 sports coupe. 

Specifically, Infiniti is in the process of replacing the Q50 and Q60 Red Sport 400 models available last year and earlier this year with the new Q50 I-Line Red Sport 400 and Q60 I-Line Red Sport 400, which means that buyers spending the $7,700 needed to move up from the 300 horsepower Q50 3.0T Sport AWD, or $9,500 to do the same from the Q60 3.0T Sport AWD, to get into one of the 400 horsepower I-Line Red Sport 400 models, now get more visual bang for their buck.  

2019 Infiniti Q50 I-Line Red Sport 400
Updated Q50 (shown) and Q60 I-Line Red Sport 400 models feature sportier glossy black 19-inch alloys. (Photo: Infiniti)

I-Line, which Infiniti says was derived from “Inspired Line,” blackens both models’ grille surrounds so that they more closely tie in with the glossy black fog lamp bezels and diffuser-style rear bumpers found on the outgoing Red Sport 400 cars, while the rear deck lid spoiler has been upgraded to high-gloss carbon fibre, and wheel wells are now filled with a special “custom imported” glossy black finish set of 19-inch alloys. 

These changes make both I-Line Red Sport 400 models appear as if they have larger more imposing grilles, while the black alloys go further toward creating a more powerful, menacing look. The outgoing Red Sport 400 cars already featured glossy black rear deck lid spoilers, but replacing these composite lip spoilers with more sophisticated carbon fibre ones helps to elevate the two cars into BMW M and Mercedes-Benz AMG territory, befitting of performance models making 400 horsepower apiece. 

2019 Infiniti Q50 I-Line Red Sport 400
Along with the gloss black trim used for the outgoing Red Sport 400 models, a new glossy black grille surround adds menacing presence. (Photo: Infiniti)

Behind all that thrust is a twin-turbocharged, direct-injection 3.0-litre V6 that also produces 350 lb-ft of maximum torque from just 1,600 rpm, which is connected to Infiniti’s “Intelligent” all-wheel drivetrain via an advanced in-house produced seven-speed automatic transmission featuring manual shift mode and downshift rev matching, the latter function rare in this segment. 

“We are delighted to showcase the I-LINE editions which have been created with a vision to be further developed into an INFINITI Canada sub-brand,” says Adam Paterson, managing director of INFINITI Canada. “We are building on the Q50 and Q60’s award-winning engine and engineering excellence, to add even more eminent style.” 

2019 Infiniti Q50 I-Line Red Sport 400
This carbon fibre rear deck lid spoiler adds a level of sophistication that befits a car producing 400 hp. (Photo: Infiniti)

Pricing for the 2019 Q50 I-Line Red Sport 400 sport sedan starts at $56,195, while the 2019 Q60 I-Line Red Sport 400 sports coupe can be had for $65,295. Both models, which are available across Canada this month, can be fully configured at CarCostCanada, with full pricing of trims, packages and individual options available, plus otherwise hard to find manufacturer rebate info and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands. 

Also, take note that many Canadian Infiniti retailers will still have outgoing 2019 Q50 and Q60 Red Sport 400 models available, which they’ll probably be more than willing to sharpen their pencils on in order to make a deal. 

Infiniti wasn’t the fastest growing luxury brand last year, but then again it gained market share while plenty of others lost ground. What’s more, its best-selling QX60 mid-size crossover SUV increased…

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
Infiniti’s QX60 is one great looking Nissan Pathfinder, the two SUVs sharing most of their underpinnings yet appearing very different from the outside. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Infiniti wasn’t the fastest growing luxury brand last year, but then again it gained market share while plenty of others lost ground. What’s more, its best-selling QX60 mid-size crossover SUV increased sales by more than 17 percent for the strongest result in its mid-size class, when the Acura MDX, Audi Q7, BMW X5, Mercedes GLE and GLS, plus most others saw their numbers go down. 

That’s an impressive result for an SUV that’s merely a more luxurious Nissan Pathfinder. Ouch, I know, that might sound harsh to some, but really it’s no bad thing. Look around and you’ll see plenty of premium brands that rely on their mainstream volume counterparts for rolling stock and more, and to be fair Infiniti has done a good job visually separating the two when it comes to exterior styling. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
The QX60 has long offered up a stylish rear design, much thanks to its trademark kinked rear quarter window. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Inside, however, it’s easy to see where the QX60 pulls more than just inspiration. The gauge cluster layout is near identical, as is the rest of the instrument panel and entire centre stack, not to mention the door panels and the three rows of seats front to back. Still, where the Pathfinder feels a bit less refined than its closest rivals, with way too much hard plastic, you’ll be hard pressed to find anything discomforting in the QX60. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
The QX60’s interior design mimic’s the Pathfinder’s cabin to a T, but the quality of materials used and fine attention to detail is much improved. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

Our tester is outfitted in the new $4,200 Sensory package, which ups the luxury quotient further by adding maple hardwood inlays to the dash, console and doors, plus special hourglass quilting to the leather upholstery, while the already heated front seats are now ventilated and the second-row outboard positions heated. Additionally, the third row gets a powered return to make loading cargo easier, while accessing the rear luggage area is more convenient thanks to a motion activated liftgate. Back inside, all occupants will enjoy a 15-speaker surround-sound Bose audio upgrade featuring digital 5.1-channel decoding, while appreciate the Advanced Climate Control System (ACCS) featuring auto-recirculation, a plasmacluster air purifier and grape polyphenol filter, while second- and third-row passengers benefit from the open airiness of a powered panoramic moonroof overhead, complete with powered sunshades. Lastly, 15-spoke 20-inch alloys on 235/55 all-seasons improve the QX60’s look and driving characteristics. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
If you like real maple hardwood buffed to perfection, the top-line QX60 Sensory is your best bet. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

But wait, there’s more. In order to get the Sensory package you first need to upgrade to the new $5,000 Essential and $4,800 ProActive packages, the first including remote engine start, entry/exit assist for driver’s seat and steering wheel, rain-sensing wipers, reverse tilt-down side mirrors, two-way power lumbar support for the driver’s seat, two-way driver’s memory with an Enhanced Intelligent Key, a 13-speaker Bose audio system, leather upholstery, Infiniti InTouch infotainment with navigation, lane guidance, and 3D building graphics, voice recognition, an Around View parking monitor with Moving Object Detection, front and rear parking sensors, SiriusXM Traffic, and more. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
Roomy and comfortable? Come back for our full review to find out what we really think. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

The ProActive package adds auto-dimming side mirrors, high beam assist, full-speed range adaptive cruise control, distance control assist, active trace control, Lane Departure Warning (LDW) and Lane Departure Prevention (LDP), Blind Spot Intervention, backup collision intervention, front pre-crash seatbelts, and Infiniti’s exclusive Eco Pedal. 

All of this kit gets added to a QX60 that’s already well equipped in renamed base Pure form with features like auto on/off LED headlights, LED daytime running lights, LED fog lights, LED taillights, roof rails, power-folding side mirrors with integrated turn signals, proximity-sensing keyless access, pushbutton ignition, a heatable leather-wrapped steering wheel, a powered tilt and telescopic steering column, electroluminescent gauges, an eight-way power driver’s seat, a six-way power front passenger’s seat, a auto-dimming mirror, a HomeLink universal garage door opener, a powered moonroof, micro-filtered tri-zone automatic climate control, an 8.0-inch centre touchscreen with a backup camera, SMS/email display, satellite radio, three USB charging ports, a powered rear liftgate, Predictive Forward Collision Warning (PFCW), Forward Emergency Braking with Pedestrian Detection (PFEB), Blind Spot Warning (BSW), and more. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
Unless you fear the outdoors, the powered panoramic moonroof found in the Sensory package is a must-have option. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

The QX60 also comes standard with all-wheel drive fed by a highly efficient continuously variable transmission with default, Sport, Eco and Snow driving modes, the second mode mentioned making the most of the standard direct-injection infused 3.5-litre V6 that makes a strong 295 horsepower and 270 lb-ft of torque while still claiming a very reasonable 12.5 L/100km in the city, 9.0 on the highway and 10.9 combined. 

2019 Infiniti QX60 Sensory
Enough cargo space for you? Find out how it measures up against key rivals in our upcoming review. (Photo: Trevor Hofmann, Canadian Auto Press)

2019 QX60 pricing starts at just $48,695, and take note all pricing for the QX60 and its competitors can be found at CarCostCanada, where you’ll also benefit from rebate information and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands.

We’ll have more on how the QX60 drives in our upcoming road test review, along with how the front strut and rear multi-link suspension behaves through town, down smooth freeways, around fast-paced corners, and over bumpy terrain, so make sure to return soon to get our full critique…

Considering how important the compact luxury SUV segment is within the entire auto sector, what took you so long Infiniti?  Of course, unlike Cadillac that’s just starting to offer its XT4 compact…

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
Infiniti has redesigned its QX50 compact luxury SUV from the ground up, and we like what we see. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Considering how important the compact luxury SUV segment is within the entire auto sector, what took you so long Infiniti? 

Of course, unlike Cadillac that’s just starting to offer its XT4 compact SUV now (Alfa Romeo even beat them to the mark with their Stelvio), the QX50 has long been part of Infiniti’s lineup, its previous EX35 nameplate reaching all the way back to 2007 when it arrived as a 2008 model. It was rebadged QX50 in 2013 as part of Infiniti’s Q (car) and QX (SUV) renaming scheme, and received an updated grille and lower fascia for 2015, but this means the FM platform-based crossover soldiered on mostly unchanged for 11 years before the new second-generation 2019 QX50 started rolling out of its Aguascalientes, Mexico production plant a little more than a year ago. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
The new QX50 offers up a sporty profile. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

The new QX50 couldn’t be any more different than the outgoing model, from the previous SUV’s rear-wheel drive biased architecture to a totally new front-wheel drive based layout, although take note that all-wheel drive is standard here in Canada. Manufacturers have been moving away from rear-drive platforms due to interior packaging restrictions, something Audi and Acura have known for more than a decade and likely one reason why their compact SUVs continually outsell all opposition. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
The QX50 benefits from a distinctive look from front to back. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

No doubt Infiniti would love to have similar success, but last year the QX50 was just 12th out of 14 compact luxury SUV entrants, and the latter two were totally new models only available for part of the year. So far 2018 is looking up thanks to this redesign, with sales having surpassed all of 2017 after just nine months, while it’s also passed right on by the Lincoln MKC, Jaguar F-Pace and Land Rover Discovery Sport, almost catching up to the Buick Envision as it’s climbed to ninth overall. It’s entirely possible we’ll see the QX50 in eighth place before the year is out, but now that it’s been in our garage for the better part of a week we think it should be finding even more success than that. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
Infiniti’s double-arch grille has won over plenty of SUV buyers, but the Japanese luxury brand hopes this new QX50 sells better than its aging predecessor. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

First of all the 2019 QX50 is one great looking SUV. Its front end is especially attractive, positioning Infiniti’s always stylish double-arch grille below a long, elegantly sculpted hood, and flanked by a stunning set of LED headlamps over a clean, sporty lower fascia. Organically shaped panels flow rearward down each side, passing by a nicely detailed chrome engine vent garnish on the upper front fenders, a metal brightwork adorned greenhouse finalizing with Infiniti’s trademark kinked rear quarter windows, and around the back where a particularly appealing rear end design features nicely shaped LED taillights, while a variety of 19- to 20-inch alloy wheels round out the design depending on trim. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
Signature LED DRLs and unique cube design LED headlights join LED fog lamps and special 20-inch alloys when moving up to Sensory trim. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

The QX50 is available in five trims for 2019, including base Luxe that starts at $44,490, Essential for $48,990, ProActive for $52,990, as-tested Sensory for $56,490, and finally top-line Autograph trim for $57,990. For full pricing of 2019 QX50 trims, packages, and standalone options, plus money saving manufacturer rebate info and otherwise hard to get dealer invoice pricing that could help you save even more, make sure to visit CarCostCanada. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
Here’s a better look at one of the 20-inch dark tinted alloys and 255/45 all-season run-flat tires that come standard with Sensory trim. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Along with AWD, even base Luxe trim comes well equipped with 19-inch alloys on 235/55 all-season run-flat tires, LED high/low beam headlights, LED signature daytime running lights, LED fog lamps, LED integrated turn signals on outside mirror housings, LED taillights, chrome-accented exterior door handles, dual chrome exhaust tips, remote engine start, proximity-sensing keyless access with pushbutton ignition, drive mode selector with standard, eco, sport, and personal settings, Infiniti’s InTouch dual display infotainment system featuring an 8.0-inch monitor on top and a 7.0-inch touchscreen below that, InTouch safety, security and convenience services, dual-zone automatic climate control, a powered panoramic glass sunroof including a powered sunshade, a powered liftgate, predictive forward collision warning, forward emergency braking with pedestrian detection, blindspot warning, and more. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
The Sensory’s Graphite interior gets open-pore maple inlays, an ultrasuede headliner and pillars, plus more ultrasuede on the instrument panel, doors and console. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Moving up to Essential trim adds a number of items you might want on your must-have list such as rain-sensing wipers, front and rear parking sensors, reverse tilting side mirrors, Infiniti’s 360-surround Around View parking monitor with moving object detection, navigation with detailed mapping, tri-zone automatic climate control with rear controls, leather upholstery, a powered tilt and telescopic steering column, plus memory for that steering wheel as well as for the front seats and side mirrors. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
Infiniti enhances the QX50’s interior with loads of its latest tech, while its level of refinement and luxury is improved too. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

ProActive trim is for those who consider advanced safety and convenience essential, as it includes automatic high beams, adaptive cruise control with full speed range and hold, distance control assist, lane departure warning and prevention, blindspot intervention, rear cross-traffic alert, backup collision intervention, steering assist, ProPilot Assist semi-autonomous self driving, Infiniti’s exclusive steer-by-wire Direct Adaptive Steering system (a first for an Infiniti SUV), a head-up display, and a 16-speaker Bose Premium Series audio upgrade. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
Surprisingly the gauge cluster is not fully digital, yet a large high-resolution colour multi-info display is packed full of functions. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

As the name implies Sensory is more about creature comforts, and while including everything already mentioned also adds 20-inch dark tinted alloys on 255/45 all-season run-flat tires, unique cube design LED high/low beam headlamps with adaptive cornering capability, extended interior ambient lighting, advanced climate control, natural open-pore maple wood inlays, ultrasuede A- and B-pillars plus an ultrasuede headliner, beautiful black ultrasuede upper instrument panel trim, door uppers, and centre console lid accents for Graphite black-trimmed interiors, while Wheat beige interiors receive leatherette accents, premium-grade semi-aniline leather upholstery, ventilated front seats, two-way front passenger powered lumbar support, rear side window sunshades, a motion activated liftgate, and metallic cargo area finishers. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
Infiniti’s dual display infotainment setup includes an 8-inch monitor up top and a 7-inch touchscreen below. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Autograph trim moves up the luxury while offering something even more individually bespoke looking, thanks to special blue ultrasuede accents replacing the black found in the Sensory model, plus white used for much of the instrument panel, centre console sides, door inserts and seats, the centre inserts of the latter featuring diamond-quilted semi-aniline leather, plus blue piping between the white leather and blue ultrasuede. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
This 360-surround Around View parking monitor with moving object detection comes standard in Essential trim. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

On a more practical note, the new QX50 is quieter than the outgoing model thanks to active engine mounts plus acoustic windshield and side window glass, while it’s also much roomier, especially when for rear passengers that now enjoy considerably more leg and headroom. In fact, Infiniti claims its rear seat space is greater than the best-selling Audi Q5 and BMW’s X3, while those back seats now slide fore and aft for more cargo space or better legroom respectively, the former growing by a substantive 368 litres to 895 behind the 60/40 split-folding rear seats, even when they’re pushed all the way backward, while sliding the rear bench as far forward as possible adds another 153 litres of gear toting capacity for a total volume of 1,048 litres when both rows are occupied. Lay the second-row seatbacks flat and cargo space expands to 1,822 litres. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
This electronic gear selector provides a hint that not all CVTs are created equal. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

As for performance, previously noted standard features like the 19- and 20-inch wheels, Intelligent AWD, and the various driving modes, as well as standard vehicle-speed-sensitive power steering or available Direct Adaptive Steering, combine with a fully independent front strut and rear multi-link suspension setup, standard Active Trace Control that autonomously adds brake pressure mid-corner to help maintain a chosen lane, plus one of the more advanced four-cylinder engine designs available today. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
Sensory trim comes standard with premium-grade semi-aniline leather upholstery. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

In fact, WardsAuto just added the QX50’s new VC-Turbo to its 2019 model year 10 Best Engines list, which is nothing new for Infiniti that’s long had one of its V6 mills honoured likewise, the latest being the Q50/Q60’s 3.0-litre twin-turbo VR V6, with previous generation 3.7- and 3.5-litre engines awarded as well. The 2.0-litre four-cylinder VC-Turbo is the world’s first production variable compression ratio engine, a technology that took Infiniti’s engineering team four years to develop. It features special connecting rods between its pistons and crankshaft that vary the compression of the fuel and air mixture, less for increasing power output when needed and more during lower loads like cruising and coasting for improving fuel efficiency. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
The new QX50’s rear passenger compartment is roomier than the outgoing model. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

The result equals 268 horsepower and 280 lb-ft of torque while fuel economy is closer to a 2.0-litre diesel four than anything gasoline-powered with similar performance. Combined with a new shift-by-wire continuously variable transmission (CVT) featuring manual shift mode, steering wheel paddles, Downshift Rev Matching, and dual transmission fluid coolers, Infiniti claims the new QX50 is 30-percent more efficient than the outgoing model, which was five-cycle rated at 13.7 L/100km city, 9.8 highway and 11.9 combined compared to 10.0 city, 7.8 highway and 9.0 combined for the new powertrain. Even with today’s fuel prices dropping along with the price of oil, every little bit counts when also factoring in our fragile economy that’s following that downward trajectory plus our currency’s never-ending devaluation through central bank managed inflation and other budget-busting price hikes. 

2019 Infiniti QX50 Sensory
New QX50 owners get much more cargo space. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

How does it all work in the real world? I’ll tell all in my upcoming road test review, plus offer my driving dynamics critique, comment on interior quality, fit, finish and features, etcetera. Make sure to come back for the full review soon, and while you’re waiting take the opportunity to enjoy all the photos in the comprehensive gallery above… 

Twilight was causing headlamps and taillights to illuminate as I was driving home the other day, which is often a dazzling spectacle of white and red LEDs in my neighbourhood of premium and exotic machinery.…

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD Road Test

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
There might be more prestigious brand names than Infiniti, but if they keep building cars as beautiful, quick and well made as the Q60, respect will grow. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Twilight was causing headlamps and taillights to illuminate as I was driving home the other day, which is often a dazzling spectacle of white and red LEDs in my neighbourhood of premium and exotic machinery. Driving up to a stoplight and one set of particularly elegant rear lamps caught my attention, followed by a captivating silhouette. My eyes immediately locked in, because I wasn’t sure what I was looking at. All I knew was that it was gorgeous. Then I laughed when I realized I was looking at the current generation Infiniti Q60, a car that I’ve spent weeks with at a time on many occasion. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
The Q60’s design ideally balances performance and elegance. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

To be completely honest, I’m more than a bit jaded when it comes to cars. This job allows me to park some pretty impressive hardware in my driveway, and like I said a moment ago, every manner of BMW, Mercedes, Audi, Jaguar, Land Rover, Lexus and the list goes on crowd the highways and byways of my well-to-do city, not to mention more Ferraris, Lamborghinis, Maseratis and McLarens, plus Bentleys and Rollers than those living anywhere outside of Beverly Hills or Dubai will ever get the chance to see. So factor that in when considering an Infiniti pulled my eyeballs. This is one stunning looking car, no matter the angle. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
Few cars look as good from the back as they do from the front. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Another reason it caused me to look is rarity. The Q60 does pretty well compared to a Lexus RC, which it more than doubled in sales last year, but it’s not as strong a seller as say an Audi A5, a BMW 4 Series, or a Mercedes-Benz C-Class Coupe. Both the 4 and A5 more than tripled the Q60’s deliveries last year, and as Q3 2018 closed BMW had sold more than four times as many 4s and Audi had moved more than five times as many A5s, the new segment leader (although we can’t say for sure how many C-Class Coupes get sold each month as Mercedes lumps their sales numbers together with C-Class Sedans). And just in case you’re feeling sorry for Infiniti, consider BMW sold more than 12 times as many 4s and Audi more than 15 times as many A5s, while Infiniti found three times as many Q60 buyers. Ouch! 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
Infiniti edges the Q60’s expansive grille with stylish dark chrome. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

While slower sales might be a negative to a company’s balance sheet, it’s not necessarily a bad thing for premium buyers who want exclusivity. Let’s face it. In Canada’s better neighbourhoods the luxury wares from the big German brands are ubiquitous, causing their owners to spend umpteen thousands more for bespoke paint, fancy wraps, carbon fibre add-ons and expensive wheels, so therefore the opportunity to get into a car as stunningly beautiful as the 2018 Infiniti Q60 for just $46,295, or this 3.0T Luxe AWD that starts at $53,295, is rare indeed (see all of the 2018 Q60’s trims and pricing at CarCostCanada, plus save on your purchase by researching possible rebates and receiving dealer invoice pricing). 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
These animalistic LED headlamps come standard. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

The base model just mentioned is the 2.0T Pure, a trim line and engine that will disappear on the Canadian market for 2019. If you can still find one and don’t care as much about forward thrust as beauty (because the car still looks as nice) its 208 horsepower Mercedes-sourced 2.0-litre turbocharged four-cylinder engine is plenty fuel-efficient, but most Q60 buyers opt for Infiniti’s own 3.0-litre turbocharged V6 that makes a much more formidable 300 horsepower and 295 lb-ft of torque, which I have to say is more than adequate, as long as you don’t try the Q60 Red Sport 400 with its same number of horses and 350 lb-ft of ready and willing torque. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
Even base Q60s come standard with gorgeous 19-inch alloy wheels. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

That’s a car I’ve previously covered and hope to again soon, but its $61,295 price point might be a bit dear for some, hence the $55,295 Q60 3.0T Sport just below and the Q60 3.0T Luxe I spent a week with. Before I delve into Infiniti’s value proposition, which is always a key reason to consider the Japanese luxury brand, let’s talk driving dynamics. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
Classy machine-finished alloy rims join dark chrome engine vents for plenty of sport with a dose of luxury. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

First off, it’s an easy car to drive around town and on the open highway, as one might expect by looking at its classy chrome detailed exterior and luxuriously appointed leather, hardwood and bright metal lined interior. The ride is firm yet comfortable, its standard 19-inch machine-finished alloys on 255/40 all-season run-flats not helping the former, but its double-wishbone front and multi-link rear suspension making sure of the latter. Infiniti has tuned the spring rates, dampers and stabilizer bars for a competent mix of compliant performance, and while not quite as capable as the Dynamic Digital Suspension included with the Q60’s two top-tier Sport trims, its agility around corners shouldn’t leave anyone wishing for too much more. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
The Q60’s LED taillights get a flowing fluid-formed shape that looks even better at night. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Speaking of more, Infiniti offers the Q60 with the complexity of four different steering systems depending on engine, trim and your willingness to pay. The base model I mentioned earlier comes with a vehicle-speed-sensitive hydraulic electronic power steering setup, while the car I tested features standard electronic power steering, yet is offered with Infiniti’s exclusive Direct Adaptive Steering, which replaces mechanical linkages with electronic switches and servo motors to save weight and further enhance the driving experience. Lastly, those two just noted Sport trims can be had with the optional direct steering system or come standard with a more performance-oriented fast ratio electronic power steering setup. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
Soft leathers, rich hardwoods and bright metals make for an opulent cabin. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

As with the suspension, I never felt any lack of response when pushing the Q60 hard through corners, something I did as often as opportunity allowed. Instead, all that was needed was a little tap on the sizeable 12.6-inch front and 12.1-inch rear discs to load up the front tires and the wonderfully tuned chassis took care of the rest. Infiniti includes standard Active Trace Control that actually enhances cornering feel by modulates braking and engine torque, and I’ve long been a fan of the brand’s rear-biased Intelligent all-wheel drive that sends all available twist to the wheels in back until tire slippage transfers up to 50 percent of torque forward to the front wheels. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
The Q60’s performance-oriented cockpit is ideally set up to optimize comfort and control. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Rear tire slippage can happen when getting hard on the go pedal, although you won’t notice any such torque transferring going on behind the scenes. All you’ll feel is immediate response from throttle input, its torque strongest between 1,600 and 5,200 rpm, which considering its aforementioned 295 lb-ft of twist is a nice broad spectrum that allows what seems like relentlessly quick acceleration. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
Bright electroluminescent dials and a large TFT multi-info display make for great legibility, but most Q60 competitors already offer fully digital gauge clusters. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

It feels especially potent when Infiniti’s Drive Mode selector is switched to Sport mode. It was quick enough in the default Standard setting, while Snow, Eco and Personal modes are also included, but Sport is best for lickety quick shifts from the wonderfully engaging seven-speed automatic that snaps to attention at takeoff or alternatively quickly drops down through the gears to find the ideal cog for passing manoeuvres. Shift intervals are nice and crisp, but to be fair this isn’t the sportiest transmission in this class, yet it’s certainly one of the best for simultaneously providing quick responses and ultra-smooth operation. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
The Q60’s dual-screen infotainment system provides a lot of digital acreage, plus good functionality. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Truly, Infiniti has really done a wonderful job with this gearbox, while along with its quick reacting performance comes Downshift Rev Matching (DRM) that makes you look and sound like a pro as the engine automatically blips to ideally match a chosen gear; a driver-adaptive learning algorithm that senses your driving style and then adjusts its shifting accordingly; Adaptive Shift Control (ASC) that gets upgraded with navigation system synchronization in Luxe trim and above, which adds GPS mapping data to the usual sensor-based system in order to automatically select shift points when the transmission is left to its own devices in Drive, selecting the best possible gear depending on uphill, downhill or curving road conditions; plus dual automatic transmission fluid coolers to keep it running smoothly and reliably. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
The navigation system was extremely accurate, and easy to operate. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

I only wish steering wheel-mounted paddles were included with V6-powered cars, and not only with the aforementioned Sport trims. This more pampering Luxe trimmed example is certainly sporty enough to warrant paddle shifters, and I for one would feel a bit put off if I paid $50k-plus for a performance coupe and wasn’t able to enjoy the hands-on control that paddles provide. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
The Around View parking monitor provides a split-screen with a regular backup camera as well as an overhead bird’s eye view that really helps out in tight situations. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

That Eco mode mentioned earlier is a pet peeve of mine, and not because it strangely still doesn’t include an auto start/stop function. While it seems to work pretty well for saving fuel, it incorporates one of my most disliked features of any car made anywhere. The Active Eco Pedal pushes back on your right foot when attempting to apply more throttle than it feels is necessary to maximize fuel economy, and I loathe this so much that I purposely won’t use Eco mode. Of note, I often use Eco mode with Infiniti’s competitors, as I like saving fuel when driving in the city, but I find the Active Eco Pedal so disturbingly intrusive that I’d rather pay more for less driving interference. Go ahead and search for it online and you’ll quickly see my distaste for this device isn’t unique, and I’m willing to be the sooner Infiniti gets rid of it the faster people will want to purchase its cars. On the positive, this version doesn’t push back as aggressively as early versions, but it still feels as if you’re pushing down on a block of wood instead of a nicely progressive gas pedal. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
The lower touchscreen adds a hands-on approach that I really appreciate. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Speaking of economy, the new 3.0-litre V6 is much more fuel-efficient than the previous 3.7-litre version, with my weeklong non-Active Eco Pedal usage measuring a combined 11.7 L/100km from mostly city and some highway driving, which comes fairly close to matching the claimed Transport Canada rating of 12.3 city, 8.6 highway and 10.7 combined. The soon-to-be-discontinued four-cylinder gets a thriftier 11.2 city, 8.5 highway and 10.0 combined rating, by the way, which really isn’t all that much better than the V6, while the brilliantly quick 400 horsepower Red Sport version is good for an estimated 12.5 city, 9.2 highway and 11.0 combined, which once again isn’t much of a penalty for its superb performance capability. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
Along with connection to an excellent 7-speed automatic transmission, the gearshift knob is finished in leather, metal and piano black lacquer. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

I’ll refrain from deep diving into every last feature and option available to Q60 buyers this time around, mostly because this review is coming out towards the end of the 2018 model’s availability and the 2019 will see plenty of changes to trims and feature sets as noted earlier, but suffice to say this current model year and the next one offer premium buyers loads of value. For example, a shortlist of standard features found on the base Pure model include such niceties as full LED headlamps, proximity keyless access, pushbutton ignition, signed aluminum treadplates, genuine aluminum interior inlays, dual-zone auto HVAC, Infiniti InTouch dual display infotainment with an 8.0-inch top monitor and 7.0-inch lower touchscreen, a reverse camera, voice recognition, text message capability, satellite radio, a powered moonroof, eight-way powered front seats with power lumbar support, rear parking sensors, Scratch Shield self-healing paint, plus all the usual active and passive safety features. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
The upper infotainment display is controlled via this rotating knob and its surrounding quick-access buttons. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Along with the more powerful engine, my 3.0T Luxe tester added remote start, auto-dimming side mirrors, a heatable power tilt and telescopic steering wheel, heatable front seats, memory for the steering wheel, seats, and side mirrors, soft perforated semi-aniline premium leather upholstery, accurate navigation with lane guidance and 3D building graphics, the navigation-synchronized adaptive shift control I mentioned earlier, real-time traffic info via SiriusXM Traffic, superb sounding 13-speaker Bose Centerpoint surround audio, a garage door opener, powered front seat torso bolsters, and more. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
Luxe trim includes these luxuriously appointed sport seats. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Infiniti added $750 worth of Majestic White Pearl paint, plus the $5,200 ProAssist-ProActive package that includes rain-sensing wipers, auto-leveling front headlamps with adaptive cornering, front parking sensors, an Around View Monitor (AVM) with Moving Object Detection (MOD), Predictive Forward Collision Warning (PFCW), Forward Emergency Braking with Pedestrian Detection (PFEB), Blind-Spot Warning (BSW), and Back Collision Intervention (BCI) with Rear Cross Traffic Alert (CTA), which proved to be a useful collection of advanced driver assistance features that worked well without being overly sensitive. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
This powered glass sunroof comes standard. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

All of this advanced equipment comes in an interior that’s beautifully finished with high-quality materials. Its dash-top is all soft touch synthetic, and stitched together with contrasting thread. Infiniti provides the same impressive treatment across the entire instrument panel, all the way down to the lower console where it turns into an even softer padded leather wrap. This even includes the glove box lid. Likewise, the door panels are finished in this comfortable leather-like material from top to just under the armrests, with contrast stitching throughout—only the lower door panels are finished in a harder plastic, which unfortunately is all too common in this class. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
Rear seat roominess and comfort is actually quite good for this class. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Infiniti enhanced the leather with a rich looking, substantive feeling dark grey hardwood, plus lots of attractive satin-finish aluminum. It’s all tastefully put together for a classy result, while some of its switchgear is edged in knurled metal for extra grip and a ritzier look. Even nicer, the previously noted Bose stereo includes gorgeous drilled aluminum speaker grates on the front doors. Yes, it’s easy to fall in love with the Q60 interior. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
The trunk is fairly small, but this is par for the course in the personal luxury coupe category. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

I’d like to see more graphical information within the gauge cluster’s multi-information display, or better yet a fully configurable TFT gauge package, but nothing like this is on offer yet. Instead, you get a simpler colour display between two analogue dials ahead of the driver, plus the aforementioned dual display infotainment system that provides more digital acreage than the majority of competitors. The top display is controlled by a rotating knob on the lower console, and the bottom display is a regular touchscreen, and while it all looks impressive initially, the latter lacks the ability to use tap, swipe and pinch gesture controls for the map, forcing you to execute such functions on the rotating dial. The latter function works reasonable well, it’s certainly not as intuitive as a regular touchscreen, which most of us are used to due to our smartphones and tablets. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
Oddly the rear seatbacks aren’t divided, meaning rear passengers can’t come along for the ride if you plan on packing longer items like skis. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

The perforated leather driver’s seat was wonderfully comfortable, and offered good lateral support made better via powered torso bolsters. This said I’d rather they included four-way powered lumbar support instead, but at least the fore and aft design came very close to pushing in at the ideal spot on the small of my back. Also on the positive, Q60 ergonomics fits my body like a glove. Its powered steering column has plenty of reach, while the seat is as adjustable as I could ever need, thus optimizing my driving position for total control and comfort. As I said over and over again in my reviews, this isn’t always the case due to my unique long-legged, short torso body type. 

2018 Infiniti Q60 3.0T Luxe AWD
I like how Infiniti celebrates their turbocharged V6, the beautifully detailed engine cover reason enough to peek under the hood. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Rear seating space is tight of course, which is par for the course in the personal coupe category, especially amongst compact D-segment models. This said I had about four inches in front of my knees when the driver’s seat was set for my five-foot-eight medium-build frame, plus ample room for my feet and about an inch above my head to the window glass. I had reasonable side-to-side room as well, measuring about three inches from my outside shoulder and four inches from the hips, while Infiniti does not provide a centre armrest in back, but a centre console includes a shallow tray and equally shallow cupholders. The seatbacks are fairly comfortable, but I wouldn’t want to sit in the back over a long haul. 

Now that I’m kind of complaining, I’m still not a fan of foot-operated parking brakes, mostly because they get in the way. Then again with the Q60 it’s not as much of a problem because no manual gearbox is offered. 

It would be silly to complain about the Q60’s small 246-litre (8.7 cubic-foot) trunk, because most personal coupes don’t offer a lot when it comes to cargo carrying capacity. Fortunately it’s nicely finished with carpeting all the way around, plus Infiniti filled the empty spare tire hole with a handy tool kit holder. The rear seat folds forward, but take note there’s no split at all, which limits cargo/passenger flexibility. 

Perfect it’s not, but factor in all you get with the 2018 Q60, from its potent and efficient powertrains to its gorgeous styling and ultra-rich cabin, not to mention its impressive load of standard features and optional kit, and it’s a lot of personal luxury coupe for a very reasonable price range. On looks alone I could recommend it, but it’s so much more than just a pretty face. If you want a truly special sports coupe that you won’t see coming around every other corner, I recommend you pay special attention to the Infiniti Q60.