Sales of the Subaru Outback have been on an upward trajectory over the past five years, with calendar year 2017’s results of 11,490 units showing 87.7 percent growth since 2013. The “if it ain’t…

2018 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited Road Test

2018 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
If you’ve always wanted a Subaru Outback but never taken the plunge, the 2018 model is the best iteration yet. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Sales of the Subaru Outback have been on an upward trajectory over the past five years, with calendar year 2017’s results of 11,490 units showing 87.7 percent growth since 2013. The “if it ain’t broke don’t fix it” mantra no doubt came into play for this 2018 model year refresh, but despite only receiving a subtle redo I have to say the iconic mid-size crossover looks better than ever. 

Over the years the design has slowly evolved from beefed up wagon to low-profile SUV, with this latest iteration the most rugged looking yet. The 2018 model gets a reworked grille, revised lower front fascia, new door mirrors, and a much more aggressive rear bumper design, making it just as appealing to adventure seeking, wilderness conquering daddies as it has always been to reality-minded mommies. 

2018 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
From side profile it’s difficult to tell new from old. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

While the grille gets a stronger strikethrough in its upper section, the 2018 Outback’s redesigned headlights might be the most dramatic visual enhancement up front. Now each cluster is more sharply angled with a unique scalloped treatment at the topmost inner point, as well as a more defined signature LED element inside, whereas the matte black lower fascia’s fog lamp bezels protrude upward in a more pronounced fashion, or at least they appear to do so now that more body-colour surfacing separates them from the centre vent. 

2018 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
The 2018 Outback’s rear bumper design is the most obvious clue to its model year. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

New mirror housings with slimmer more sophisticated looking LED turn signals aside, there’s not much to distinguish the outgoing Outback from the new one when viewed from the side, although if you look very carefully from this vantage point it’s possible to pick out some augmentation to the new taillight lenses and rear bumper, the latter feature getting additional black cladding extending upward at each corner. That bumper cap makes the most obvious difference from the rear view too, giving the Outback most of the rugged visual upgrade mentioned earlier. Outback faithful should be well pleased with the exterior changes made to this 2018 model, although improvements made inside might elicit even broader smiles. 

2018 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
All Outback headlights are redesigned, yet only upper trims get full LED illumination. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

The renewed interior features higher-grade materials, greater comfort, reduced engine, wind and road noise due to acoustic front door glass, and more advanced electronics, with some key upgrades including a redesigned steering wheel with reorganized switchgear, standard dual USB charging ports for rear passengers, a new 6.5-inch STARLINK infotainment touchscreen for base 2.5i trim that supports Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration plus Aha radio, a centre display that grows from 7.0 to 8.0 inches in just-above-base 2.5i Touring trim and higher, plus a new voice-activated dual-zone automatic climate control interface featuring digital readouts for easier legibility and greater overall functionality also comes standard with the same 2.5i Touring and upper trims, as does a redesigned centre vent grille, centre panel, air conditioning panel, and instrument panel. Lastly, Limited and Premier trims get steering-responsive LED headlights, while more functionality gets added to these models’ navigation system. 

2018 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
Along with the new headlights, the grille, bumper and wheels get noticeable revisions. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

All 2018 Outbacks get a retuned suspension that makes a noticeable improvement in smoothing out pavement imperfections and quieting the ride, while it certainly doesn’t seem to have upset the mid-size crossover’s always stable and confidence-inspiring handling. The Outback isn’t just a strong performer, but possibly even more importantly it feels a lot more premium than its mainstream-branded peers. There’s a genuine solidity to its overall build quality, while the inherently smooth 3.6-litre H-6 adds to this upscale ambience in ways only a six-cylinder can. 

2018 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
How long will this 3.6R badge grace the back of top-tier Outback trims? The more formidable new 2.4-litre turbo-four will likely replace the big H-6 soon. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

I don’t know how long Subaru will support this engine now that the even more potent 2.4-litre turbocharged four-cylinder has been introduced for the larger 2019 Ascent, up 4 horsepower and 30 additional lb-ft of torque over the 3.6R, but for now the refined powerplant does a good job of helping the Outback imitate a luxury CUV in quietness and performance, its output measuring a meaningful 256 horsepower and 247 lb-ft of torque. 

Performance off the line is very strong, although it’s more of a smooth linear power than anything WRX-like. Still, the high-torque Lineartronic continuously variable transmission (CVT) offers nice positive shifts, plus you can slot the lever over to a new seven-speed sequential manual mode before swapping gears via steering wheel paddle shifters in order to maximize performance or short-shift to minimize fuel usage, the latter good for a reasonably efficient claimed 12.0 L/100km city, 8.7 highway and 10.5 combined as-tested or 9.4, 7.3 and 8.5 respectively with the base 175-horsepower 2.5-litre four-cylinder. 

2018 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
Outback interiors keep getting better and better. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

The steering is substantive feeling, meaning that it’s not too loose and light, but it certainly isn’t overly heavy or ponderous either. In fact I found its weight just right no matter the speed, and extremely easy to turn into tight parking spaces. 

Speaking of easy, visibility is superb in all directions thanks to a tall SUV-like ride-height and expansive glass all the way around, while rearward visibility and safety is improved by a very clear backup camera with an especially good wide-angle view, not to mention dynamic guidelines. 

2018 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
This is easily one of the highest quality interiors Subaru has ever done. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Improving driver ease yet further, Subaru includes an electromechanical parking brake with auto-release, plus the brand’s well-proven Symmetrical all-wheel drive system incorporating hill descent control and X-mode to overcome rougher off-road sections as well as deeper snow, either of which is made easier due to an impressive 220 mm (8.7 inches) of ground clearance. 

We didn’t have any snow to slog through during my time with the car and had no opportunity to take it up the mountain for winter testing, only encountering some West Coast spring showers, but previous experiences with the Outback in inclement weather have always been positive so there’s no reason this one would be any different. In fact, the new model’s improved suspension compliance should be a benefit for dealing with such situations, on top of providing the superb ride mentioned earlier. 

2018 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
Electroluminescent dials are joined by a 5.0-inch multi-info display in upper trims. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Not affecting my tester yet still important to note for the majority of Outbacks being sold, all four-cylinder trims are now Partial Zero Emissions Vehicle (PZEV) rated, which translates into one of the lowest emissions ratings in the mid-size SUV class. Important for safety, all Outbacks get a revised brake booster to improve stopping performance, while Subaru’s acclaimed EyeSight suite of advanced driver assistance systems remains available with all trims above base and standard on the top-line the Premier model. 

2018 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
The centre stack gets a redesign, with this top-line infotainment touchscreen upsized by an inch to 8.0 inches in diameter. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

EyeSight, at just $1,500, includes pre-collision braking, pre-collision brake assist, pre-collision throttle management, lane departure warning, lane sway warning, lane keep assist, lead vehicle start alert, reverse automatic braking, adaptive cruise control, and new high beam assist, which incidentally let Subaru remove the third camera from the other side of the Outback’s rearview mirror. 

Of course, a full array of active and passive safety features come standard across the line, while the Subaru Rear/Side Vehicle Detection System (SRVD), which includes blindspot detection, lane change assist, and rear cross-traffic alert, is standard with all models above the base 2.5i. Additional safety upgrades include a collision detection feature that can automatically unlock the doors if required, plus automatic door locks that do the opposite when getting under way, a window off-delay timer, and improved child safety seat anchors. Fully equipped with EyeSight and the Limited/Premier models’ full LED headlights, which are now steering-responsive as well, the 2018 Outback’s collective safety kit once again receives a best-possible Top Safety Pick Plus rating from the IIHS. 

2018 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
It’s hard not to like the colourful Apple-inspired menu interface. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Along with the Outback’s lengthy list of safety equipment and aforementioned mechanical prowess, my Limited model was beautifully finished inside, plus roomy and comfortable for the five-seat mid-size crossover class. Cream-coloured contrast stitching enhanced the soft-touch instrument panel, even extending to the halfway point of the centre stack, and crossed the nicely revised door panels as well, albeit without the contrast stitching which is instead used for the door inserts and armrests, while new shift panel detailing and attractively redesigned leather upholstery join features like fabric-wrapped A-pillars that were already doing a good job of pulling this mainstream volume-branded crossover SUV closer to premium status. 

2018 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
Subaru has refreshed the lower console too. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

The new steering wheel is a really attractive leather-wrapped design with sporty thumb spats to enhance comfort and grip. Switchgear is very good as well, and includes audio controls, voice activation, and phone controls on the left spoke, plus multi-information display controls below that, while the right spoke is taken up by dynamic cruise control functions, with a switch under that for the heatable steering wheel. 

Possibly the biggest overall improvement to Subaru interiors is on the digital front, with the Outback’s displays very high in resolution, its colours bright, and graphics benefiting from wonderful depth of contrast. This is most noticeable with the new larger infotainment touchscreen, but it’s also true within the driver’s primary gauge cluster that features beautifully bright backlit analogue dials surrounded by an even brighter full-colour 5.0-inch multi-information display in EyeSight-equipped models (a 3.5-inch display is standard), this filled with plenty of premium-level functions, such as EyeSight those features including adaptive cruise control, the ECO gauge, additional fuel efficiency info, etc. 

2018 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
The 10-way powered driver’s seat is wonderfully comfortable and very supportive. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

Back to the centre stack, infotainment functions include AM, FM and satellite radio, CD, USB, Bluetooth and aux media capability, Bluetooth phone, very accurate navigation with nicely detailed mapping, Starlink, Aha, Pandora, Travel Link, plus the aforementioned Apple CarPlay and Android Auto apps, car info, car settings, plus more, while it’s all organized from a stylishly colourful Apple-like home menu. 

Features in mind, a quick glance at any Outback’s wheel and tire package can help distinguish its trim level, as base 2.5i and Touring models get 17-inch rolling stock and Limited/Premium trims receive larger 18-inch alloys. On that note, pricing for the base 2.5i starts at $29,295 plus freight and dealer fees, as found on CarCostCanada.com, while moving up through the line shows Outback 2.5i Touring trim priced $3,500 higher at $32,795, 2.5i Touring trim with EyeSight at $34,295, 2.5i Limited trim at $36,795, 2.5i Limited trim with EyeSight at $38,295, and 2.5i Premier with EyeSight at $39,195. 

2018 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
Rear seat roominess, comfort and finishing quality is top-notch for the class. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

If you want the 3.6R six-cylinder engine in base Touring guise you’ll be asked to pay $35,795, whereas the 3.6R Limited starts at $39,795, the same package with EyeSight that I drove will set you back $41,295, and finally the 3.6R Premier with EyeSight is priced at $42,195. 

Features exclusive to Limited trims and above that were not yet mentioned include brushed aluminum front doorsill protectors, silver and authentic looking matte woodgrain interior accents, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a Homelink garage door opener, rear climate controls, a great sounding 576-watt, 12-speaker Harman/Kardon audio system, two-way driver’s seat memory, a four-way powered front passenger seat, a heated steering wheel, two-way heatable rear outboard seats, and more. 

2018 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
A powered tailgate opens up to an expansive cargo area. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

As yet unmentioned items pulled up from lesser trims that enhance the Limited model’s experience include auto on/off headlamps, LED daytime running lights, fog lamps, welcome and approach lighting, LED turn signals on the side mirror housings, a windshield wiper de-icer, proximity-sensing keyless access, pushbutton ignition, auto-dimming side mirrors, illuminated vanity mirrors, a sunglasses holder in the overhead console, a powered moonroof, a rearview camera with dynamic guidelines, a 10-way power-adjustable driver’s seat with powered lumbar support, a rear centre armrest, a powered rear liftgate, three-way heated front seats, a retractable cargo cover, four chrome cargo tie down hooks, two utility bag hooks, a cargo tray, a sub-floor compartment, 60/40-split rear seatbacks with one-touch flat-folding capability, plus more. 

2018 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
The Outback is hardly short on utility. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

As noted earlier the Outback is spacious, with plenty of room for large adults front to back. It’s comfortable too, the front seats superbly supportive, especially in the lower back and from side-to-side. What’s more, the Outback is as nicely finished in back is it is up front, and includes a large and wide centre armrest that flips down at the ideal height for optimal adult comfort (or at least it was perfect for me), while it comes filled with sizeable cupholders featuring grippy rubber clasps to help keep drinks securely in place. A covered compartment on the backside of the front centre console includes two USB charging ports plus an auxiliary plug, but other than aforementioned rear ventilation, good reading lights overhead, and big bottle holders moulded into the lower door panels that’s about it for rear passengers. 

2018 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
Get the impressive 3.6R H-6 while you can, as it’s days are likely numbered. (Photo: Karen Tuggay, Canadian Auto Press)

As for rear seat roominess, I had about six inches ahead of my knees when the driver’s seat was set up for my five-foot-eight height, plus loads of space for my feet. There was also a good five inches above my head and about the same next to my shoulders and hips. In other words, there’s loads of room in back for two average sized adults and one child, or three smaller adults. Likewise, the cargo compartment is accommodating thanks to 1,005 litres (35.5 cubic feet) behind those rear seatbacks, or 2,075 litres (73.3 cubic feet) when they’re laid flat. 

Thanks to Subaru making this already excellent crossover SUV better with each makeover, it’s hardly a mystery why Outback popularity continues to grow.

The all-new 2019 Ascent is the biggest thing to ever hit a Subaru dealership, and it will arrive this summer for just $35,995 plus freight and fees.  Configured for seven or eight occupants, the North…

Subaru grows its crossover SUV lineup with new 2019 Ascent

2019 Subaru Ascent
The 2019 Subaru Ascent promises big space for growing Canadian families. (Photo: Subaru)

The all-new 2019 Ascent is the biggest thing to ever hit a Subaru dealership, and it will arrive this summer for just $35,995 plus freight and fees. 

Configured for seven or eight occupants, the North American-exclusive model will immediately go up against the hottest mid-size crossover SUV sellers on the Canadian market, its full list of competitors (from best-selling to least during the first three months of 2018) including the Ford Explorer, Toyota Highlander, Kia Sorento, Volkswagen Atlas, Dodge Durango, Nissan Pathfinder, Honda Pilot, Hyundai Santa Fe XL, Chevrolet Traverse, Dodge Journey, GMC Acadia, Mazda CX-9, and Ford Flex. Of course, the Outback will continue growing Subaru’s stake in the five-passenger mid-size crossover SUV segment, its Q1 deliveries already slightly improved over last year’s results. 

2019 Subaru Ascent
All-weather capability and classy good looks come standard with every Ascent. (Photo: Subaru)

Subaru has taken a very different approach with the new Ascent when compared to its previous attempt at pulling in mid-size SUV buyers. The Tribeca (2005–2014), while nicely finished and very competent from a performance standpoint, suffered from controversial styling and rather cramped rear quarters, whereas the Ascent pulls its design from the Japanese brand’s very successful current Forester and Outback playbook, albeit with a bolder, larger grille and longer, taller profile, while it’s anything but short on size. 

2019 Subaru Ascent
A new 260-hp turbocharged flat-four should combine strong performance with good fuel economy. (Photo: Subaru)

The Ascent measures 4,998 millimetres (196.8 inches) front to back with a 2,890-mm (113.8-inch) wheelbase, while it stands 1,819 mm (71.6 inches) tall including its standard roof rails. Additionally, the big Subaru’s width spans 2,176 mm (85.6 inches) with its side mirrors extracted, and its track measures 1,635 mm (64.4 inches) up front and 1,630 mm (64.2 inches) at the rear. 

To put this into perspective, the new Ascent is 48 mm (1.9 inches) shorter than the best-selling Explorer, albeit with a 24-mm (0.9-inch) longer wheelbase, while some might also be surprised to find out that the new Subaru is 42 mm (1.6 inches) taller than the sizeable Ford. The only Explorer measurements to exceed the Ascent relate to width, which show the blue-oval SUV a considerable 119 mm (4.7 inches) wider with 66 / 71 mm (2.6 / 2.8 inches) more front / rear track respectively. This said the Explorer is one of the mid-size segment’s largest SUVs. 

2019 Subaru Ascent
The Ascent could be a powerful conquest vehicle for Subaru, as it targets the mid-size SUV market perfectly. (Photo: Subaru)

Comparing the new Ascent to other top-sellers shows that it’s longer, wider and taller than the Highlander and Sorento, longer and taller than the Pilot and Santa Fe XL, wider and taller than the Pathfinder, merely wider than the Durango, and only taller than the Atlas. 

Of more importance to most mid-size SUV shoppers will be passenger volume and cargo space, which measure 4,347 litres (153.5 cubic feet) for the former and 2,449 litres (86.5 cubic feet) for the latter in the Ascent, when both rear rows are laid flat. These figures compare well against key rivals, with Ascent passenger volume even exceeding the massive Explorer’s and its standard eight-occupant seating configuration a rarity in the class, while the big Subaru’s maximum cargo capacity is amongst the segment’s most accommodating too. Rear passenger access should be easy as well, thanks to rear doors that open to 75 degrees. 

2019 Subaru Ascent
A premium-level interior should appeal to near-luxury shoppers. (Photo: Subaru)

Being a Subaru SUV the Ascent includes standard all-wheel drive, which proponents will argue is one of the most capable systems available. The engineering behind Subaru’s full-time Symmetrical AWD starts with its overall chassis layout, which ideally distributes weight thanks in part to the even balance and low profile of the longitudinally mounted, horizontally opposed flat “boxer” engine. When combined with the full-time nature of Subaru’s AWD system, plus more torque being applied to the wheels with the most grip, which not only enhances traction but improves control, the Ascent should be plenty capable no matter the road or trail surface, while its standard X-mode off-road system, complete with hill descent control, joins a generous 220 millimetres (8.66 inches) of ground clearance for a confidence-inspiring lift over obstacles, snow banks and more. 

2019 Subaru Ascent
A state-of-the-art 8.0-inch infotainment touchscreen is available, including Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, navigation and more. (Photo: Subaru)

Power comes from a new turbocharged 2.4-litre four-cylinder engine, which is once again a horizontally opposed design. The powerplant makes a robust 260 horsepower and 277 lb-ft of torque, the latter maximized between 2,000 and 4,800 rpm, all of which should answer why Subaru chose not to utilize the 3.6-litre H-6 used in top-line Outback trims. In fact, the new four-cylinder produces 4 more horsepower and 30 additional lb-ft of torque than the six, so we should probably expect this new four to replace the upgraded engine in that Outback and soon find it in other Subaru models as well. 

2019 Subaru Ascent
The Ascent Limited provides a luxurious leather-lined cabin. (Photo: Subaru)

Of course, the new 2.4-litre four should be more efficient than the larger displacement H-6 too, but not because of its transmission. Both make use of Subaru’s High-torque Lineartronic CVT (Continuously Variable Transmission), considered to be one of the more efficient types of transmissions available and ideal for mid-size crossover SUV applications thanks to smooth, linear power delivery. 

Subaru will also add a standard set of steering wheel paddle shifters to improve driver engagement, along with an eight-speed Manual Mode featuring sportier driving characteristics and standard Active Torque Vectoring, first introduced on the WRX and WRX STI performance models, so expect the Ascent to be enjoyable to drive despite its large mid-size dimensions. 

2019 Subaru Ascent
Ascent Touring trim includes this fabulous panoramic sunroof. (Photo: Subaru)

Additionally, the Ascent promises car-like ride and handling due to the use of the new Subaru Global Platform (SGP), which combines rigid yet lightweight unibody construction with a fully independent MacPherson strut front and double-wishbone rear suspension system, enhanced further by a stabilizer bar mounted directly to the body at the rear and electric rack and pinion steering up front. Lastly, 18- or 20-inch alloy wheels get added depending on trim. 

2019 Subaru Ascent
The Ascent comes standard with a second-row bench seat, which ups the total occupant count to eight. (Photo: Subaru)

On that note, the 2019 Ascent can be had in Convenience, Touring, Limited and Premier trims, with standard Convenience features not already mentioned including auto on/off headlights, three-zone automatic climate control, 6.5-inch touchscreen infotainment with Android Auto and Apple CarPlay smartphone connectivity, a rearview camera, satellite radio, heated front seats, an eight-way power-adjustable driver’s seat, second-row USB ports, a total of 19 cup and bottle holders, and more. 

2019 Subaru Ascent
Second-row captain’s chairs are optional, reducing maximum capacity to seven. (Photo: Subaru)

All 2019 Ascent trims include standard Subaru EyeSight driver assist technologies as well, which include adaptive cruise control with lead vehicle start assist, pre-collision braking, pre-collision brake assist, pre-collision throttle management, lane departure warning, lane sway warning, and lane keeping assist, while all the expected active and passive safety features come standard as well. 

For $40,995 in eight-passenger trim or $41,495 with second-row captain’s chairs, which reduces the total seat count to seven, Ascent Touring trim adds the Subaru Rear/Side Vehicle Detection (SRVD) system, which includes blind spot detection, lane change assist, and rear cross traffic alert, as well as proximity keyless access, pushbutton ignition, auto-dimming mirrors, a leather-wrapped steering wheel and shift knob, larger 8.0-inch touchscreen infotainment, premium cloth upholstery, a panoramic sunroof, second-row climate controls, a rear cargo cover, a powered tailgate, a transmission oil cooler, pre-wiring for a trailer hitch, and an increased towing capacity of 2,270 kg (5,000 lbs). 

2019 Subaru Ascent
Third-row seating appears very spacious. (Photo: Subaru)

Limited trim, available for $46,495 in the eight-passenger layout and $46,995 in the seven-passenger configuration, adds the larger 20-inch alloys, steering-responsive LED headlights with high beam assist, a heatable steering wheel, and a 6.3-inch colour multifunction display that shows the time, temperature and dynamic features such as an inclinometer, while a navigation system with detailed mapping is included within the infotainment display, and additional Limited features include a 14-speaker Harmon/Kardon audio system, a four-way power-adjustable front passenger seat, leather upholstery, heated second-row outboard seats, integrated rear door sunshades, third-row USB ports, and more. 

2019 Subaru Ascent
The Ascent’s cargo hold is cavernous with both rear rows folded down. (Photo: Subaru)

Top-line Premier trim, which comes fully equipped at $49,995, even including standard captain’s chairs, adds an upgraded front grille, rain-sensing wipers, a front-view camera, a Smart Rearview Mirror with an integrated rear-view camera, brown perforated leather upholstery, ventilated front seats, ambient interior lighting, a 120-volt power outlet on the rear centre console, etcetera (see detailed 2019 Subaru Ascent pricing and more at CarCostCanada.com). 

“It’s no secret that SUVs are extremely popular these days, but we wanted to offer more than just another option — we wanted to offer a class-leading vehicle that delivers what Canadian customers are looking for,” said Yasushi Enami, chairman, president and CEO of Subaru Canada, Inc. (SCI). “We believe the 2019 Ascent delivers that and more, and we’re very excited to bring this North American-exclusive model to market.” 

The 2019 Subaru Ascent, produced in North America at Subaru of Indiana Automotive, Inc., will arrive at your local Subaru dealer this summer.

Audi and Subaru have been named best Mainstream Brand and best Premium Brand respectively in ALG’s 2018 Canadian Residual Value Awards (RVA), an important benchmark used for forecasting future vehicle…

Audi and Subaru earn top honours in 2018 ALG Canadian Residual Value Awards

2018 Subaru Impreza
The Subaru Impreza achieved best residual value in its “Compact” class. (Photo: Subaru)

Audi and Subaru have been named best Mainstream Brand and best Premium Brand respectively in ALG’s 2018 Canadian Residual Value Awards (RVA), an important benchmark used for forecasting future vehicle values by auto industry professions.

Now in its 10th year, ALG’s RVA projects future values of new models from 26 separate market segments, ranging from “Alt-fuel” to “Fullsize Commercial Van” and everything in between. There are many ways to measure value, although within the car industry the difference between the initial price paid for a new vehicle and its resale value after three or four years is a key parameter. ALG uses the average ownership duration of four years to determine mainstream volume brand values and three years for premium brands, with the results showing both Subaru and Audi are tops in their respective sectors.

2018 Subaru Crosstrek
The Crosstrek earned best resale value in the “Subcompact Utility” category. (Photo: Subaru)

“Depreciation is the single biggest cost of vehicle ownership, and informed consumers understand the importance of resale value when making their purchase decision,” said Eric Lyman, vice president of ALG. “The ALG Residual Value Award is a meaningful achievement in the hyper-competitive automotive landscape. Residual values are a key indicator for the market success of a vehicle, factoring in quality, product execution and brand desirability as primary drivers of ALG’s forecast.”

This is Subaru’s fourth consecutive RVA mainstream brand win, showing an impressive consistency in quality, execution and desirability. This year the brand earned four segment awards, including the Impreza in the “Compact” class, the Crosstrek in the “Subcompact Utility” segment, the Outback in the “Midsize Utility 2nd Row Seating” segment, and the WRX in the “Sportscar” segment.

2018 Subaru Outback
Subaru’s Outback has the highest residual value in the “Midsize Utility 2nd Row Seating” segment. (Photo: Subaru)

Other notable mainstream brands include Toyota that dominated SUV and truck segments with five RVAs including the Tundra achieving its eighth consecutive year topping the “Fullsize Pickup” category, the Tacoma at five RVA “Midsize Pickup” class awards in a row, the Highlander winning the “Midsize Utility 3rd Row Seating” segment, the 4Runner in the “Off-Road Utility” class, and the Sequoia earning top marks in the “Fullsize Utility” category. Honda received three RVA segment awards including the Fit in the “Subcompact” class, Accord in the “Midsize” category, and Odyssey in the “Minivan” segment.

Nissan managed two winners including the Rogue in the “Compact Utility” class and Maxima in the “Fullsize” segment, while the only one-off deserving mention is Kia’s Niro in the “Alt-fuel” category.

2018 Audi A5 Coupe
Audi’s A5 has the best residual value amongst “Premium Midsize” models. (Photo: Audi)

Audi, which has experienced a dramatic upsurge in new vehicle sales in recent years, achieved four category wins including the A5 in the “Premium Midsize” class, A7 in the “Premium Fullsize” segment, Q5 in the “Premium Compact Utility” segment, and Q7 in the “Premium Midsize Utility 3rd Row Seating” category.

“Audi has emerged in recent years as a contender in the luxury space against top European rivals, finding success with new product entries in the utility space and emphasizing innovative technologies that have resonated well with luxury consumers,” stated an ALG press release.

2018 Audi Q5
The new Q5 is rated highest for resale value in the “Premium Compact Utility” segment. (Photo: Audi)

Mercedes also took home four awards, albeit with two in the commercial sector. The winners included the Metris in the “Midsize Commercial” segment and the Sprinter in the “Fullsize Commercial” category, while its CLA Class took home top marks amongst “Premium Compact” models, and the G-Class achieved the highest score in the “Premium Fullsize Utility” segment.

No other premium brand earned multiple RVAs, but notable mentioned include the Maserati Quattroporte in the “Premium Executive” class, the Porsche 718 Boxster in the “Premium Sportscar” segment, and the Land Rover Range Rover Velar in the “Premium Midsize Utility 2nd Row Seating” category.

Subaru Canada, Inc. (SCI) capped off calendar year 2017 with its best December on record, helping the Japanese automaker to achieve its sixth consecutive year of annual sales growth. December 2017’s…

Subaru Canada achieves six consecutive record years of sales growth

2018 Subaru Impreza
The Impreza experienced growth of 42.4 percent in 2017. (Photo: Subaru)

Subaru Canada, Inc. (SCI) capped off calendar year 2017 with its best December on record, helping the Japanese automaker to achieve its sixth consecutive year of annual sales growth.

December 2017’s total was 3,876 units for a 4.6-percent gain over the same month in 2016, pushing Subaru’s total annual deliveries to 54,570 vehicles for an 8.7-percent year-over-year sales increase when compared to 2016’s 50,190-unit tally.

2018 Subaru Crosstrek
The Crosstrek found 14.9 percent more buyers for a total of 11,168 deliveries last year. (Photo: Subaru)

“More Canadians than ever before drove Subaru’s sales with a record-setting results streak, which gave rise to Subaru’s highest sales ever,” said Yasushi Enami, chairman, president and CEO of Subaru Canada, Inc. “With our sixth consecutive annual sales record in the books, we are ready for 2018 as our strong dealer network steps forward into 2018 and we bring our best product offering yet.”

2018 Subaru WRX STI
The WRX and WRX STI collectively increased from 4,217 to 4,616 units for a 9.5-percent gain in 2017. (Photo: Subaru)

Movers and shakers included the Impreza compact four-door sedan and five-door hatchback, plus the Crosstrek subcompact crossover SUV that achieved 38.6 and 48.0 December growth respectively. The Impreza’s yearly sales were even more impressive, with growth of 42.4 percent to 10,617 units overall in 2017, while the Crosstrek found 14.9 percent more buyers for a total of 11,168 deliveries last year.

2018 Subaru Outback
The Outback crossover’s 2.1-percent year-over-year growth was more modest last year. (Photo: Subaru)

Additionally, the WRX and WRX STI performance models collectively increased from 4,217 to 4,616 units for a respectable 9.5-percent gain in 2017, while the mid-size Outback crossover’s year-over-year growth was more modest, from 11,255 to 11,490 units for a 2.1-percent upward trend. Despite its smaller numbers, BRZ sports coupe growth was a solid 6.3 percent from 740 units in 2016 to 787 last year, although it should be noted that the BRZ’s 2016 sales represented a significant drop when compared to much stronger sales in years prior.

2018 Subaru BRZ
BRZ sports coupe growth was a solid 6.3 percent from 740 units in 2016 to 787 last year. (Photo: Subaru)

Ironically in a market that predominantly favours utilities, Subaru’s best-selling Forester compact SUV was one of the only models to slip backward due to sales of 13,441 units in 2017 compared to 13,798 in 2016, this being a 2.6-percent slide, the other model losing ground year-over-year being the Legacy mid-size sedan that dropped from 3,001 units in 2016 to 2,451 deliveries last year, representing an 18.3-percent downturn.

2018 Subaru Forester
Ironically in a market that favours SUVs, Forester sales fell backward in 2017. (Photo: Subaru)

On the positive, the 2018 Legacy has received a refresh that should boost interest, while the Forester will receive a dramatic redesign later this year. Available even sooner, the all-new 2019 Ascent mid-size crossover SUV, which just made its Canadian debut at the Montreal auto show, will arrive this summer. The Ascent is Subaru’s largest-ever crossover SUV with the choice of seven- or eight-occupant seating, expanding the Japanese brand’s market reach to a much broader market than ever before. This should help Subaru continue its sales growth momentum.

We’re back in the Subaru Forester’s saddle for 2018, this time in top-line 2.0XT Limited trim that comes standard with a 250-hp turbo-four, CVT with paddles, AWD, steering-responsive LED headlights,…

2018 Subaru Forester 2.0XT Limited Road Test

Subaru's Forester has come a long way since a funky squared-off, raised wagon by the same name debuted in 1997. That model did well for the brand and helped usher in the compact crossover SUV craze, but in 2002 the hard edges were smoothed out, refinements improved the cabin, and soon after a version of the WRX STi's turbo-four was added to a new top-line XT trim that pumped up performance. The Forester grew up to true compact SUV dimensions in 2008 for the 2009 model year with the release of its third-generation, while 2013's fourth-gen model, followed by its mid-cycle upgrade last year, returned some of its edgy, chunky original design elements, albeit in a larger more upright utility.

I've just scratched the surface of the many changes that joined those updates, plus numerous modifications in between, to the point that today's Subaru is so far advanced over its predecessors it might as well be an entirely different SUV. Of course, the same can be said of many popular cars and Read Full Story