While the majority of car enthusiasts will immediately conjure thoughts of the legendary 911 sportscar when Porsche enters the conversation, crossover SUVs are the German premium brand’s biggest sellers.…

2019 Porsche Cayenne Buyer’s Guide Overview

2019 Porsche Cayenne
Porsche has introduced a redesigned Cayenne SUV for 2019, and while it doesn’t break any styling molds it represents major changes beneath the skin. (Photo: Porsche)

While the majority of car enthusiasts will immediately conjure thoughts of the legendary 911 sportscar when Porsche enters the conversation, crossover SUVs are the German premium brand’s biggest sellers. Such is the case with most automakers in today’s sport utility crazed market, and the Porsche Cayenne gets credit for being in on the early stages of this relatively new automotive phenomenon. 

The Cayenne was first introduced in 2002, and quickly became Porsche’s most popular model. Now that mantle falls on the smaller, more affordable Macan, with the two having made up more than 70 percent of the brand’s best-ever Canadian sales last year. Still, the Cayenne is key to continued profits due to its higher cost of entry and much pricier high-end model lineup. 

2019 Porsche Cayenne
The new Cayenne, shown here in base trim, features a single body-wide LED taillight like the recently redesigned Macan, Panamera and upcoming 2020 911. (Photo: Porsche)

What’s more, Porsche sales are on an even stronger course in 2018 than the previous record year, up more than 40 percent over the first nine months, and now with a completely redesigned third-generation Cayenne, 2019 should be a banner year if our shaky economy holds up. 

With the launch of the new model Porsche addresses some key issues that previous generations chose not to, particularly size. Measuring 4,918 millimetres (193.6 inches) from nose to tail, the 2019 Cayenne is now 63 mm (2.5 in) longer than the model it replaces, plus (not including mirrors) it’s also 44 mm (1.7 in) wider at 1,983 mm (78.1 in) with a 9-mm (0.3-in) lower roof height at 1,696 mm (66.8 in), except for the top-line Cayenne Turbo that keeps the same wheelbase and width yet adds 8 mm (0.3 in) of extra length while losing another 23 mm (0.9 in) in overall height. 

2019 Porsche Cayenne Turbo
The new Cayenne is longer and wider than its predecessor, with top-line Turbo trim (shown) slightly larger than all. (Photo: Porsche)

That wheelbase length remains identical from old to new at 2,895 mm (114.0 in), yet the ability to slide the rear seats fore and aft by about six inches allows for more rear legroom, while the really big interior gains show up behind the back seats where 100 litres (3.5 cubic feet) of cargo space has been added for a new total of 770 litres (27.2 cu ft), which is almost a 15-percent improvement over the outgoing model. Additionally, when the standard 40/20/40-split reclining rear seatbacks are lowered they form a nearly flat loading floor, improving the Cayenne’s practicality even more, while expanding its load carrying capacity to 1,710 litres (60.4 cu ft). 

2019 Porsche Cayenne S
A new aluminum-intensive body structure saves weight and increases torsional rigidity, helping to make the new Cayenne (shown here in S trim) the best handling version yet. (Photo: Porsche)

Surprisingly, despite the new model’s increased size it’s now 55 to 65 kilograms (121.2 to 143.3 lbs) lighter, depending on trim and configuration, thanks to a body structure made from roughly 50 percent aluminum (including the front wings, doors, side panels, roof and rear liftgate) and 50 percent high-strength steel, plus other mass-reducing components such as a lithium-ion polymer (LiPo) starter battery that saves 10 kilos (22 lbs) on its own. 

This also results in better weight distribution, now about 55/45 percent front/rear in base configuration, so together with an increase of about 20-percent in overall torsional rigidity due to the tauter mixed-metal construction method, which according to Porsche includes more than 6,800 MIG (metal inert gas) and laser weld points, 630 “float drill screws”, and 170 metres (557 feet) of bonding agent for each Cayenne produced at the brand’s Bratislava, Slovakia assembly plant, improvements have been made to straight-line performance, handling and fuel-efficiency. 

2019 Porsche Cayenne
The new Cayenne should be better off-road too, while towing is once again rated at 3,500 kilos (7,700 lbs). (Photo: Porsche)

To that end the mid-size crossover SUV is pulling yet more cues from Porsche’s legendary 911 sports car, particularly by providing staggered narrower-to-wider front-to-rear tire sizes on all trims, as well as new optional Rear Axle Steering, the latter feature helping to reduce the Cayenne’s turning radius at low speeds for easier manoeuvrability in tight spaces like parking garages. 

Also improving handling, albeit at higher speeds, the new Cayenne’s front suspension gets upgraded from the old double wishbone design to a multi-link setup like the rear, which promises to enhance steering response while maintaining better tire contact with the road surface below. 

2019 Porsche Cayenne
The Cayenne boasts plenty of technical improvements to help it make the most of slippery situations. (Photo: Porsche)

Continuing on the theme of relentless grip, the Stuttgart brand also includes its Porsche Traction Management (PTM) active all-wheel drive system as standard equipment, which comes together with an electronically variable, map-controlled multi-plate clutch, an automatic brake differential (ABD) and anti-slip regulation (ASR), while options include a new three-chamber Adaptive Air Suspension with alternative ride heights that are preset to 28 mm lower than normal or 56 mm taller than normal, plus improved Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control (PDCC) electronic roll stabilization, which now benefits from the Cayenne’s new 48-volt electrical system that allows for faster-reacting electrical components compared to the old model’s hydraulic system. All are now made to work more effectively via standard Porsche 4D Chassis Control, resulting in the most capable Cayenne yet. Also important, the new Cayenne can still tow up to 3,500 kilograms (7,700 lbs) of trailer weight. 

2019 Porsche Cayenne
The base Cayenne gets a more potent 335-hp 3.0L V6 for much quicker acceleration, while all Cayennes receive a new ZF-sourced 8-speed automatic. (Photo: Porsche)

The new third-generation Cayenne is now available in base Cayenne trim for $75,500 plus freight and fees, while other trims include the $92,600 Cayenne S, $91,700 Cayenne E-Hybrid, and $139,700 Cayenne Turbo, with a Cayenne GTS and other variations no doubt on the way. 

All Cayennes come mated to Porsche’s new ZF-sourced eight-speed Tiptronic S automatic transmission featuring manual mode, paddle shifters, quicker response to input, and faster shift increments in lower gears to enhance on-pavement prowess and off-road performance. As a side benefit the new German-designed gearbox delivers up a smoother auto stop-start system with coasting capability, the outgoing Aisin-sourced eight-speed autobox in need of some refinement in this respect. 

2019 Porsche Cayenne S
The Cayenne S sports a 2.9L twin-turbo V6 that makes 434 hp and 406 lb-ft of torque for a much quicker 5.2-seccond sprint to 100km/h. (Photo: Porsche)

For 2019, the base model’s V6 engine loses 600 cubic centimetres on its way from 3.6 to 3.0 litres of displacement, yet is now turbocharged for 35 more horsepower and 37 additional lb-ft of torque resulting in a new maximum of 335 horsepower and 332 lb-ft, the latter arriving 1,000-plus rpm sooner at 1,840 rpm. It’s good for a zero to 100km/h sprint time of just 6.2 seconds, or 5.9 seconds with the Sport Chrono Package, and is now capable of a 245 km/h top track speed, which incidentally is a massive performance gain over the previous base Cayenne model that could only manage the same feat in 7.6 seconds, whereas its top speed was just 230 km/h. 

2019 Porsche Cayenne E-Hybrid
The new Cayenne E-Hybrid produces 455 net hp and 516 lb-ft of torque for a 5-second dash to 100km/h. (Photo: Porsche)

The upgraded Cayenne S includes a 2.9-litre twin-turbocharged V6 that makes 434 horsepower and 406 lb-ft of torque for a significantly quicker 5.2-second sprint from standstill to 100km/h, or 4.9 with the Sport Chrono package, plus a new top speed of 265 km/h. 

The new E-Hybrid raises the game for electrified Cayennes by combining the base 3.0-litre V6 with a plug-in hybrid drivetrain featuring a 14 kWh lithium-ion battery with on-board charger, resulting in a shocking new total of 455 net horsepower and 516 lb-ft of torque, and a zero to 100km/h time of 5.0 seconds with its standard Sport Chrono Package, plus a top speed of 253 km/h. 

2019 Porsche Cayenne Turbo
The new Cayenne Turbo utilizes Porsche’s 4.8L twin-turbo V8 to make 541 hp and 568 lb-ft of torque for a super-quick 4.1-second launch to 100km/h, or 3.9 seconds with the Sport Chrono Package. (Photo: Porsche)

Finally, the new 2019 Cayenne Turbo utilizes Porsche’s 4.8-litre twin-turbo V8 to produce 541 horsepower and 568 lb-ft of torque for an ultra-quick 4.1-second launch to 100km/h, or 3.9 seconds with the Sport Chrono Package, and a terminal velocity of 253 km/h. 

Improving performance further, the Cayenne will offer the choice of three driving modes including Comfort, Sport and Sport Plus, as well as an Individual mode that lets each driver configure their own personal setup. 

2019 Porsche Cayenne S
The 2019 Cayenne gets a much improved interior with larger, higher quality digital interfaces. (Photo: Porsche)

The 2019 Cayenne also features Mud, Gravel, Sand, and Rock modes for overcoming more treacherous terrain off-road, tackling the wild unknown always high on Porsche’s SUV priority list. To that end its maximum water wading depth is now 526 mm (20.7 in), while the new model’s approach angle is 27.1 degrees, breakover angle 21.1 degrees, and departure angle 24.1 degrees. 

Improving performance further is a new world-first optional high-performance braking technology dubbed Porsche Surface Coated Brakes (PSCB). The cast-iron discs are coated with 70 micrometers of tungsten carbide, which, when bedded in cause a mirror-like finish to the surface of each rotor. Porsche promises stronger performance over steel brakes, with reduced wear and therefore a longer life. In fact, Porsche claims a 35-percent reduction in brake wear when upgrading to PSCB, while brake dust is reduced by up to 50 percent. Also, they’re available for less than half the price of the optional Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) package. 

2019 Porsche Cayenne E-Hybrid
The look of the gauge cluster is familiar, but to each side of the tachometer are large 7-inch TFT displays. (Photo: Porsche)

As noted earlier, all-important fuel economy is improved as well, with the base Cayenne good for a claimed 12.4 L/100km in the city, 10.1 on the highway and 11.4 combined, compared to 12.9, 9.7 and 11.5 respectively with the outgoing model, while the Cayenne S is estimated to achieve 12.9 L/100km city, 10.4 highway and 11.8 combined, compared to 13.9, 9.6 and 12.0 in the old version. Lastly, the new Cayenne Turbo receives a claimed rating of 15.6 L/100km city, 11.8 highway and 13.8 combined, compared to 16.7, 11.2 and 14.3 with the previous model, the end result being notable improvements from all 2019 Cayenne trims despite their significant performance upgrades. 

2019 Porsche Cayenne
The centre touchscreen is considerably larger at 12.3 inches and much more advanced in every way. (Photo: Porsche)

Styling plays an important role in any new model’s redesign, but the Cayenne’s reshaped body panels also aid performance due to an improved coefficient of drag of 0.35. Most will more likely be drawn to its Macan-inspired front fascia that, as always, looks meanest in Turbo guise. This is where its familial resemblance to the all-new 2020 911 is most obvious too, its wide, squared-off, blackened grille opening much larger and more dramatic than the air intakes found on previous generations, while the new Cayenne’s narrow, body-width single-unit LED taillight cluster shares much with the new 911 and Macan as well. 

2019 Porsche Cayenne
The lower console features touch-sensitive switchgear under smartphone-style black glass. (Photo: Porsche)

Other muscular details include aggressive hood creases and deeper Coke bottle-like sculpting at each side, while the roofline tapers downward in 911 coupe-like fashion as it nears the rear hatch, this now possible due to a much more design-flexible Volkswagen group MLB platform architecture that no longer forces the Cayenne to share its side doors with the Touareg. 

2019 Porsche Cayenne E-Hybrid
The seats look fabulous and occupants should benefit from more interior room. (Photo: Porsche)

Inside, the new Cayenne receives improvements in design, materials quality, and refinement, but most will likely notice its new electronic interfaces first and foremost. The primary gauge cluster features dual 7.0-inch TFT colour displays flanking a classic analogue tachometer at centre, while just to the right is the same 12.3-inch Porsche Communication Management (PCM) touchscreen infotainment system first used in the second-generation Panamera. Resolution quality, depth of colour and contrast, plus operating system speed is all improved, as is overall ease of use and the amount of features as well as their functionality, with some highlights including a rearview camera with ParkAssist front and rear parking sensors, Apple CarPlay smartphone connectivity, an Online Navigation Module, wireless internet, Bluetooth with streaming audio, 10-speaker 150-watt audio, satellite radio, and Porsche Car Connect that adds Carfinder, Remote Vehicle Status, Remote Services, and the Porsche Vehicle Tracking System (PVTS). 

2019 Porsche Cayenne
The Cayenne’s second row is expansive and available panoramic sunroof makes it seem even more spacious. (Photo: Porsche)

Additional in-vehicle enhancements include touch-sensitive quick-access controls under smartphone-like black glass on the lower console surrounding the new electronic shifter and electromechanical parking brake, while classy knurled metal detailing help to dress up key dials and rocker switches. 

2019 Porsche Cayenne S
Four-zone climate control is just one of many options available for the 2019 Cayenne. (Photo: Porsche)

The 2019 Cayenne comes stock full of standard features such as LED headlamps, four-point LED daytime running lights within each headlight, three-dimensional LED taillights with integral four-point brake lights and a centre light strip, 19-inch alloy wheels (up an inch from last year), brushed aluminum door sill guards, LED interior lights, a heated smooth-finish leather-wrapped multifunction steering wheel, rain-sensing wipers, active carbon filtered dual-zone automatic climate control, two USB charging ports in the front centre console and two in the rear centre console, heatable eight-way powered front seats, partial leather upholstery, a retractable cargo cover, a powered rear liftgate, Porsche Hill Control (PHC) and automatic hold function, tire pressure monitoring, all the usual active and passive safety features including front knee airbags and rear side-thorax airbags, Porsche’s Warn and Brake Assist pedestrian detection system, and more. 

2019 Porsche Cayenne
More cargo space makes the 2019 Cayenne easier to live with. (Photo: Porsche)

As always with Porsche, the 2019 Cayenne continues to offer the longest list of packages and options in the luxury SUV sector, with some available features including myriad 19- to 22-inch alloy wheels, various leather colours and qualities, proximity-sensing keyless access, active LED Matrix headlights, thermal/noise insulated glass, soft-close doors, ambient lighting, auto-dimming centre and side mirrors, a head-up display, 14- and 18-way powered front seats with available massage, ventilated front and heated rear outboard seats, a panoramic glass sunroof, Bose or Burmester surround audio systems, a 360-degree surround parking monitor, adaptive cruise control, Lane Change Assist, Lane Keep Assist, traffic sign recognition, four-zone automatic climate control with rear controls, heat-sensing Night Vision Assist that sees pedestrians and animals even when the driver can’t, a trailering package, roof rails in various colours, a multitude of exterior and interior trim upgrades, an off-road package, and the list goes on and on.

The 2019 Cayenne is currently available at Porsche retailers across Canada, but before you head down to your local Porsche dealership make sure to check out our massive photo gallery above and watch all the videos below:

 

The new Porsche Cayenne. TVC: “Neighbor” – Ad filmed in Vancouver (0:59):

 

The new Cayenne: a sportscar for five (2:11):

 

The new Porsche Cayenne in motion (1:19):

 

The new Porsche Cayenne Turbo in motion (1:17):

 

The new Cayenne E-Hybrid in motion (1:18):

 

Global endurance test for the new Cayenne (3:39):

 

Designing the new Porsche Cayenne (5:24):

 

The design of the new Porsche Cayenne Turbo (1:16):

 

The new Porsche Cayenne – Comfort (1:41):

 

The new Porsche Cayenne – Sportiness (2:14):

 

The new Porsche Cayenne – Everyday Practicality (2:23):

 

The new Porsche Cayenne – Driver Assistance (1:02):

 

The new Cayenne E-Hybrid: facts & figures (1:24):

 

The new Porsche Cayenne: facts & figures documentary (18:38):

 

How to Video Cayenne “PCM based Services – E-Charging” (1:23):

This isn’t the first time a street-legal Porsche broke a lap record on the famed Nürburgring-Norschleife, and we’re pretty sure it won’t be the last either.  Back in April of this year we reported…

Porsche 911 GT2 RS MR is the now fastest street-legal sports car on the ‘Ring

2019 Porsche 911 GT2 RS MR
This Porsche 911 GT2 RS MR, specially tuned by Manthey-Racing, just became the fastest street-legal car to lap the Nürburgring-Norschleife at just 6:40:33. (Photo: Porsche)

This isn’t the first time a street-legal Porsche broke a lap record on the famed Nürburgring-Norschleife, and we’re pretty sure it won’t be the last either. 

Back in April of this year we reported on the amazing new Porsche 911 GT3 RS breaking the seven-minute mark with a time of 6:56.40, but on Thursday, October 25 it was the even more formidable GT2 RS MR lapping the 20.6-km (12.8-mi) circuit in a mere 6:40.33 minutes, knocking 6.95 seconds off the September 2017 lap time of the non-MR tuned GT2 RS. 

Lars Kern, the 31-year-old development engineer and race driver who first piloted the 911 GT2 RS to its now broken record, was once again at the wheel, which makes this most recent result a more accurate representation of the two cars’ performance thanks to taking some driver discrepancy out of the equation. 

2019 Porsche 911 GT2 RS MR
The 911 GT2 RS produces an incredible 700 hp, making it the most powerful and fastest production 911 of all time. (Photo: Porsche)

“The drive was great fun,” said Kern, who is very familiar with the ‘Ring’ due to plenty of test drivers, record runs and VLN races. “The balance of the car is also very good with the new package. I did not have to take any great risks to be fast. But I only had one attempt because it was already getting dark. It worked out first time though.” 

Both 911 GT2 RS models produce the same incredible 700 horsepower, making this model the most powerful and fastest production 911 of all time, but the MR was set up by Manthey-Racing specifically for tackling the Nürburgring-Norschleife, and the 160-plus strong motorsports team knows a lot about shaving seconds from the popular German racetrack near the Belgian border. 

“We are very proud,” said Manthey-Racing CEO Nicolas Raeder. “It was a great challenge to make the already tremendously fast Porsche 911 GT2 RS even faster.” 

Of course, conditions were dry, allowing Kern to make the most of his record lap run. Esso supplied the fuel, while the only major modification made to the car was the addition of a racing-spec driver’s seat that can be ordered from Manthey-Racing if choosing to upgrade to their GT2 RS MR club sport and track day special. According to Porsche the seat was only fitted to alleviate safety concerns, and didn’t subtract any weight from the stock GT2 RS. 

2019 Porsche 911 GT2 RS MR
The 911 GT2 RS MR was set up by Manthey-Racing specifically for tackling the Nürburgring-Norschleife. (Photo: Porsche)

“We kept our eye on the weather all day and thought hard about whether such a drive was possible. We would not have taken any risks if it was raining or if the track was slightly damp,” says Dr. Frank-Steffen Walliser, Head of Motorsport and GT Cars.  

Of note, the otherwise stock 911 GT2 RS featured Manthey-Racing’s new performance kit that includes minor chassis and aerodynamics modifications. Thanks to being set up specifically for the Nürburgring-Norschleife circuit’s characteristics, this MR-specified model became the fastest road-legal vehicle to ever lap ‘The Green Hell’ track. 

“In this test drive, we simply wanted to assess the potential of the vehicle once more,” added Walliser. “The result is quite impressive. It really is a fabulous time. This shows again very clearly the exciting possibilities of this sports car.” 

2019 Porsche 911 GT2 RS MR
The record-setting car was driven by 31-year-old Lars Kern, who also set the previous 911 GT2 RS record last year. (Photo: Porsche/Gruppe C Photography)

The stock GT2 RS, which debuted in June 2017 at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in West Sussex, England, uses a twin-turbo 3.8-litre version of Porsche’s legendary horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine to make 700 horsepower at a lofty 7,000 rpm (that’s an astonishing 184.2 horsepower per litre) and 553 lb-ft from 2,500 to 4,500 rpm. 

Thanks in part to weighing just 1,470 kilograms (3,241 pounds) the rear-wheel drive GT2 RS is capable of sprinting from standstill to 100km/h in a shocking 2.8 seconds, can achieve in-gear acceleration from 80 to 120 km/h in just 1.5 seconds, and attain a top speed of 340 km/h (211.2 mph). Amazingly, this road-going production GT2 RS is capable of a very reasonable 15.4 L/100km in the city, 11.3 on the highway and 13.5 combined, important for a car that also gets used for endurance racing. 

The new Porsche 911 GT2 RS is now available from $334,000 (see all 2018 Porsche 911 pricing including the 911 GT2 RS at CarCostCanada, plus access money saving rebate info and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands). 

Before you go, make sure to check out our photo gallery as well as some incredible video footage of the entire record-setting lap from within the 911 GT2 RS MR cockpit:

 

New record: 911 GT2 RS MR laps the Nürburgring Norschleife in 6:40.3 minutes. (7:14):

Now moving into the third year of its second-generation redesign, the thoroughly improved Panamera four-door coupe is once again available in the purest of Porsche performance trims, GTS.  The new GTS…

2019 Panamera lineup gets sporty new 453 horsepower GTS

2019 Porsche Panamera GTS
New for 2019, Porsche has added a sporty GTS model to its Panamera lineup. (Photo: Porsche)

Now moving into the third year of its second-generation redesign, the thoroughly improved Panamera four-door coupe is once again available in the purest of Porsche performance trims, GTS. 

The new GTS model slots in between the $118,500 Panamera 4S and $116,800 4 E-Hybrid models and the $172,500 Panamera Turbo line in both price and performance, with a starting MSRP of $146,200 plus freight and fees in the regular five-door liftback body style or $153,300 in Sport Turismo guise. 

2019 Porsche Panamera GTS
The new Panamera GTS gets the model’s telltale blackened exterior trim and other upgrades. (Photo: Porsche)

Unlike the previous Panamera GTS that stuffed a big naturally-aspirated 4.8-litre V8 with 440 horsepower and 384 lb-ft of torque under the hood, the new one uses the same twin-turbocharged 4.0-litre V8 engine found in the latest Panamera Turbo, albeit detuned to make 453 horsepower and 457 lb-ft of torque, which is 13 horsepower and a sizeable 73 lb-ft of torque more than the outgoing model, resulting in a zero to 100km/h sprint time of just 4.1 seconds, compared to 4.4 seconds with the previous GTS as well as the current 440 horsepower Panamera 4S (or 4.2 seconds with the optional Sport Chrono Package), 4.6 seconds with the 462 net-horsepower 4 E-Hybrid, and 3.8 seconds (3.6 seconds with Sport Chrono) with the 550 horsepower Panamera Turbo. 

2019 Porsche Panamera GTS
Regular and Sport Turismo body styles can be had with the GTS upgrade. (Photo: Porsche)

The Panamera’s standstill to 100km/h straight-line performance ranges from 5.7 seconds with the base 330 horsepower rear-wheel drive Panamera to 3.4 seconds in the almighty 680 net-horsepower all-wheel drive Turbo S E-Hybrid, so the new GTS fits right into the quicker side of the equation, while it also powers from zero to 160km/h in just 9.6 seconds before attaining a top speed of 292km/h (289 km/h for the GTS Sport Turismo). By comparison, the 4S takes 10.3 seconds to arrive at 160km/h and peaks at 289km/h, whereas the Turbo S E-Hybrid hits the 160km/h mark by 7.6 seconds and maxes out at 310km/h. 

2019 Porsche Panamera GTS
Grey lighting elements help to distinguish GTS styling. (Photo: Porsche)

Like all other Panamera models, the new GTS utilizes Porsche’s new in-house designed and built eight-speed PDK dual-clutch transmission, while Porsche Traction Management (PTM) all-wheel drive makes sure that all available power is put to efficient use. 

Being that most owners will never see the top speed of any Panamera, with even the base model capable of 264km/h, the GTS sets itself apart from its siblings with styling and handling. With respect to the latter, the new model utilizes a standard three-chamber adaptive air suspension preset 10 millimetres lower than the regular Panamera, with the standard Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) system modified for an even sportier setup than usual. Larger 390-mm front and 365-mm rear disc brakes harness all the GTS’ forward momentum, making sure the big four-door is as capable at stopping as it is at going. 

2019 Porsche Panamera GTS
Unique GTS details include blackened side vents and wheels. (Photo: Porsche)

If you don’t happen to see the italicized “GTS” script on the lower front door panel or rear liftgate as it speeds past, the new model is as easy to spot from a distance as other GTS models in the Porsche lineup thanks to blackened exterior trim in place of body-colour and metal brightwork. Additionally, a standard Sport Design package means that a black lower lip spoiler, side skirts and rear diffuser get added, while grey accented headlamps and taillights maintain the darkened theme. Lastly, glossy black 20-inch multi-spoke Panamera Design alloys round out the exterior look. 

2019 Porsche Panamera GTS
Trademark GTS design elements get applied generously inside, particularly soft black suede-like Alcantara and beautiful anodized aluminum accents. (Photo: Porsche)

Inside, trademark GTS design elements get applied generously, particularly soft black suede-like Alcantara and beautiful anodized aluminum accents. Both are applied to the standard sport steering wheel, with just the former dressing up each insert of the otherwise leather sport seat upholstery front to back. Alcantara gets used for all armrests as well. 

Additionally, as part of the standard GTS Interior Package, Porsche covers the steering wheel hub, the upper and lower sections of the dash including the glove box lid, the edges of the centre console, and each door panel in its entirety with soft leather for a downright hedonistic experience. 

2019 Porsche Panamera GTS
The Alcantara enhanced sport seats can be upgraded with Carmine Red embroidered GTS logos, red contrast stitching and red seatbelts, or other colours if you prefer. (Photo: Porsche)

The aforementioned sport steering wheel includes its own heatable element to match those in the front seats, plus each spoke is filled with multifunction switchgear that includes Connect Plus for accessing a variety of digital services, while at the backside of each spoke you’ll find a set of metal paddle shifters. 

The aforementioned GTS Interior Package can also be combined with a Carmine Red or Chalk grey two-tone effect for an extra $3,980, or if you want to personalize the look further you can choose from myriad leather colourways. Porsche also offers the ability to upgrade the interior with a unique tachometer face, Carmine Red or Chalk contrast stitching throughout the interior, embroidered GTS headrest logos in Carmine Red or Chalk, matching seatbelts, etcetera. 

2019 Porsche Panamera GTS
At the heart of the new 2019 Porsche Panamera GTS is this glorious 453-hp twin-turbo 4.0-litre V8. (Photo: Porsche)

All of the special GTS features get added to a new Panamera that was much improved for its second-generation makeover, with all 2019 models including the Porsche Advanced Cockpit digital gauge cluster as standard, not to mention advanced driver assistance systems like the highly sophisticated Porsche InnoDrive adaptive cruise control system with stop and go capability plus more. 

Also, new to the Panamera range yet standard with the GTS is a full colour head-up display unit that projects vital information onto the windscreen ahead of the driver. 

The new 2019 Panamera GTS is available now at Porsche retailers across Canada.

Few luxury brands get as much diversity from a given model as Porsche. The sports car of sports cars, for instance, the Porsche 911, is available in eight different models that range from $104,000 to…

2018 Porsche Panamera Buyer’s Guide Overview

2018 Porsche Panamera 4 E Hybrid
Porsche’s Panamera offers a diverse range of models, powertrains and trims. (Photo: Porsche)

Few luxury brands get as much diversity from a given model as Porsche. The sports car of sports cars, for instance, the Porsche 911, is available in eight different models that range from $104,000 to $334,000, and within this range of models are multiple body styles, performance grades and trims. The variations seem limitless. 

The Porsche Panamera four-door coupe doesn’t cover quite as much of a price spread and is only available in three models for 2018, but once again within those models are multiple body styles, performance grades and trims, so while the variations don’t appear quite as limitless as 911 permutations, the chances of seeing the exact same Panamera driving down the street toward you is near impossible. 

2018 Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid
The new electrified models are some of the most potent, with this Panamera 4 E-Hybrid combining a twin-turbo V6 with Porsche’s plug-in hybrid drivetrain and AWD for 462 net horsepower. (Photo: Porsche)

To help shed some light on the breadth of Panamera models available, Porsche Canada divides its road-hugging four-door coupe into three categories including Panamera, Panamera E-Hybrid and Panamera Turbo, while a fourth Panamera GTS model will slot in between the latter two for 2019. 

Within these classifications are three body styles and various states of tune. The former includes the regular-length Panamera, the long-wheelbase Panamera Executive that adds 150 mm (5.9 inches) between the axles and significantly lengthens the entire car for improved rear legroom, and the shooting-brake, wagon-style Panamera Sport Turismo that uses the regular wheelbase yet increases cargo volume by 27 litres (1.0 cubic foot) behind the rear seatbacks and 51 litres (1.8 cubic feet) when those seats are folded flat, while the latter variances are much more diverse. 

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo Executive
The Panamera Executive body style provides a 150-mm longer wheelbase for increased rear legroom. (Photo: Porsche)

Base Panamera trim incorporates a 330 horsepower turbocharged V6 with rear-wheel drive (RWD); the numeric 4 designation signifies the same engine with all-wheel drive (AWD); the 4S denotes a twin-turbo V6 making 440 horsepower mated to AWD; the 4 E-Hybrid combines a twin-turbo V6 with Porsche’s plug-in hybrid drivetrain and AWD for 462 net horsepower; the Turbo boasts a twin-turbocharged V8 and AWD for 550 horsepower; and finally the Turbo S E-Hybrid with its twin-turbo V8, plug-in hybrid and AWD combination results in a staggering 680 net horsepower. 

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo Executive
The Panamera Executive’s rear quarters are limousine-like. (Photo: Porsche)

Connecting powerplant to driveline is Porsche’s new eight-speed dual-clutch PDK transmission that works with both hybrid and non-hybrid models, as well as both rear- and all-wheel drivetrains. Introduced just last year with this new Panamera, the new gearbox might just be the most important “cog in the wheel” both literally and figuratively, in that it replaces three transmissions from the previous generation, including a six-speed manual used with base model V6 and naturally aspirated V8 trims, a seven-speed PDK found most everywhere else, and a Tiptronic S eight-speed automatic exclusive to hybrids and diesel models. 

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid
The Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid puts a shocking 680 hp through all four wheels resulting in 0-100km/h in just 3.4 seconds and a claimed 4.8 Le/100km. (Photo: Porsche)

The former transmissions did an admirable job, but the performance gained by the new eight-speed PKD has made a significant difference across the line, especially amongst hybridized Panameras that have been transformed from fast fuel-sippers to the dominant forces within the Panamera lineup. 

The new eight-speed PDK transmission builds on the seven-speed original that was already impressive, with better efficiency, quicker shifts, smoother shift intervals, and most importantly greater strength, the new transmission given a torque ceiling that reaches upwards to 737 lb-ft. 

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid
The Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid is the ultimate four-door sports car. (Photo: Porsche)

This last point is critical when fitted to the aforementioned hybrid powertrains that produce immense amounts of torque at a much faster rate than their conventionally powered siblings. To be clear, Porsche didn’t create a one-size-fits-all dual-clutch gearbox solution, but rather a modular design that allows different versions of the same basic transmission to be used for hybrid, non-hybrid, rear-wheel drive, and all-wheel drive applications. 

For instance, the electrified variant fits its hybrid module within the PDK’s bellhousing, while a hang-on clutch transfers torque to the front axle in conventionally powered all-wheel drive configurations. With a focus on efficiency, the eight-speed PDK provides three overdrive ratios, which means the Panamera achieves its terminal velocity in sixth gear. This in-house design certainly serves all Panamera purposes well. 

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid
The Panamera’s cockpit is driver-centric, much like the 911 in style and design. (Photo: Porsche)

This being a Porsche, performance numbers factor heavily into the purchasing decision for most buyers. The good news is that even the base rear-drive Panamera can sprint from standstill to 100km/h in just 5.7 seconds, whereas the same engine with all-wheel drive can do so in 5.5 seconds. If you’re still yearning for more speed, the Panamera 4S manages the same feat in just 4.4 seconds. 

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid
The Panamera’s gauge cluster incorporates an analogue centre tachometer surrounded by two 7.0-inch TFT displays. (Photo: Porsche)

You’ll need to add 0.1 seconds for extended wheelbase Executive models, but on the contrary you can enhance acceleration by opting for the Sport Chrono Package that chops 0.2 seconds off of all zero to 100km/h sprint times via sportier engine, transmission and chassis tuning. The Sport Chrono Package also includes a special Sport Plus button next to the regular Sport button, which makes the engine even more responsive than when in Sport mode by adjusting the rev-limiter to a harder setting, plus it sharpens turn-in and overall steering sensitivity, and increases the standard Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) and Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control Sport (PDCC Sport) damper rigidity. What’s more, the Panamera’s adaptive air suspension lowers and its spring rate firms up, while the Rear Axle Steering with Power Steering Plus improves agility yet further. 

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid
Just dial in your drive mode from this handy steering wheel-mounted switch. (Photo: Porsche)

The former benefits low-speed manoeuvrability by pointing front and rear wheels in the opposite direction, shortening the turning circle, and also enhancing high-speed stability by steering the front and rear wheels in the same direction, while Power Steering Plus boosts the electric power steering to lighten its load at low speeds and firms it up while responding with more precision at high speeds. 

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Sport Turismo
This might look like a regular Panamera from the front… (Photo: Porsche)

All driving modes, including Normal, Sport, Sport Plus and Individual are available from a new steering wheel mounted rotating switch featuring an integrated Sport Response button, the latter similar to Launch Control albeit even more useful on a daily basis, as it not only primes the engine and transmission for quickest possible acceleration, but works just as well off the line as it does during overtaking moves on the highway or track. Consider it a “push to pass” mode that provides maximum responsiveness for about 20 seconds at a time. 

And yes, Launch Control, which optimizes acceleration from a standing start, is included as well, as is a performance display within the standard 12.3-inch Porsche Communication Management (PCM) infotainment touchscreen, plus an analogue/digital chronograph stopwatch mounted atop the dash top for calculating performance/track lap times. Porsche also adds a graphic within the primary instrument cluster’s multi-information display that shows longitudinal and lateral acceleration. 

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Sport Turismo
…. but the Sport Turismo is really the sportiest five-door sport wagon in existence. (Photo: Porsche)

Back to straight-line performance figures, the first electrified Panamera is the 4 E-Hybrid that moves off the line similarly to the aforementioned 4S despite being more powerful, taking a mere 0.2 seconds longer to hit the 100km/h mark due to 300 kilos (661 lbs) of extra weight. Of course it’s the hybrid’s 5.1 Le/100km (compared to 10.1 L/100km) city/highway combined fuel economy and its ability to run totally on electric power for up to 50 kilometres (31 miles) at speeds of 140 km/h (87 mph) that separates it from the conventionally powered pack. 

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Sport Turismo
All Panamera models and trims are beautifully finished inside. (Photo: Porsche)

Next are the Panamera Turbos. The twin-turbo V8’s 550 horses and 567 lb-ft of twist manage to launch it to 100km/h in a scant 3.8 seconds, or once again 3.6 seconds with the Sport Chrono Package. 

Lastly, the Turbo S E-Hybrid is why the new eight-speed PDK needed to be so robust. With its twin-turbo V8 and plug-in hybrid combination making a shocking 680 horsepower and 626 lb-ft of torque it needed to be as strong as possible, its amazing all-wheel thrust capable of flinging it to 100km/h in a seemingly unreal 3.4 seconds despite gaining 315 kilograms (694 lbs) over its Turbo counterpart, let alone 140 kg (308 lbs) more than the lesser 4 E-Hybrid, while its top track speed is a staggering 310 km/h (192 mph). 

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Sport Turismo
Hybrid models get unique gauge elements, plus plenty of information about Porsche’s plug-in electric system. (Photo: Porsche)

Batteries are heavy, not to mention all the compact yet still mass amassing hybrid components, but once again it’s all worth it when passing by the pump, the top-tier Panamera also excelling at efficiency performance with a claimed 4.8 Le/100km rating. The Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid is truly a best of both worlds, have your cake and eat it too kind of car. 

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Sport Turismo
The Sport Turismo offers a little more airspace behind the rear seats, along with a larger cargo area. (Photo: Porsche)

On that note, the base Panamera is good for a claimed rating of 11.0 L/100km in the city, 8.3 on the highway and 9.8 combined, with some thanks to its standard auto start-stop function that not only shuts the engine off when it would otherwise be idling while stopped, but includes an innovative coasting mode. As you might imagine the more powerful engines use more fuel, but even the most formidable non-hybrid Turbo ekes out a commendable 13.4 city, 10.1 highway and 11.9 combined. 

Once you’ve decided which model, body style and trim you’d like, deciding on options can be an overwhelming prospect. This side of bespoke coachbuilders that make most everything by hand, no other manufacturer offers as many possible build combinations as Porsche. Just go ahead and try to put one together on the company’s online configurator and you’ll quickly figure this out. 

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Sport Turismo
This 4.0-litre twin-turbo V8 gets electrified to the power of 680! (Photo: Porsche)

For such reasons there’s no way to provide a full menu of standard and optional features here in this overview, but take note that over and above items already mentioned base model highlights include LED headlamps, Porsche’s quad of signature LED spotlights within each headlight, three-dimensional LED taillights with the same four-point LED signatures, 19-inch alloy wheels, an adaptive rear spoiler, brushed aluminum door sill guards, an electromechanical parking brake, partial leather upholstery, eight-way powered front seats with heated cushions and driver’s memory, and much more. 

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Sport Turismo
“Turbo S” script within the tachometer lets you know you’re driving the world’s fastest four-door hybrid, just in case your right foot hadn’t figure that out all on its own. (Photo: Porsche)

The leather-wrapped multifunction steering wheel is heatable in standard trim too, and features paddles shifters on its backside in all trims, while you’ll be looking through it at an instrument cluster comprised of two large 7.0-inch high-resolution digital displays surrounding a large black-faced analogue tachometer, while other standard items include pushbutton ignition, auto-dimming interior and exterior mirrors, a HomeLink garage door opener, rain sensing wipers, filtered dual-zone automatic climate control, front and rear parking sensors, a panoramic sunroof, a powered rear liftgate, tire pressure monitoring, and the large PCM infotainment interface noted earlier, all standard. 

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo Executive
The Panamera, shown here in long-wheelbase Executive trim, makes a striking pose. (Photo: Porsche)

The infotainment display on the centre stack is filled with functions such as Apple CarPlay iPhone connectivity and a backup camera with ParkAssist, plus plenty of services like Real Time Traffic, News, Weather, Contacts, Calendar, Napster, a vehicle locator, remote door lock, etcetera, an Online Navigation Module, 4G LTE Capability with in-vehicle WiFi Hotspot, 10-speaker 150-watt audio, and more, again all standard. 

As noted, the package and options list is epically long and varied, with dynamic cornering and self-cleaning headlamps, soft-close self-cinching doors, higher grade leathers, myriad seat adjustments with powered massage, ventilated front seats, heated rear seats, four-zone auto climate control, Bose surround audio, and an even more potent Burmester 3D surround sound audio upgrade that comes with 21 individually controlled speakers and 1,455 watts of power, while advanced driver assistance systems include Adaptive Cruise Control with Traffic Jam Assist, Lane Keep Assist, Lane Change Assist, Night Vision Assist, a Speed Limit Indicator, and more. 

2018 Porsche Panamera 4 E-Hybrid
The Executive might offer more rear legroom, and the Sport Turismo more cargo space, but the regular Panamera is plenty roomy all on its own. (Photo: Porsche)

To give you an idea of how wide the Panamera pricing spectrum spans, the base model starts at just $97,300 before freight and fees, while a fully loaded Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Sport Turismo can reach upwards of $300,000 — check CarCostCanada for all retail and dealer invoice prices, plus rebate information. 

Panamera pricing is fair too, because along with exceptional performance and high-end premium features galore its interior is as good as anything available today. The quality of materials is exemplary, craftsmanship exquisite, and detailing superb. Ergonomically it’s far superior to most four-door luxury coupes, with rear seat roominess improved over its predecessor and downright limousine-like compared to some it competes against, while cargo carrying capacity is right up there with the class average. 

You’ll find 493 litres (17.4 cubic feet) of luggage space under the powered liftback, or 405 litres (14.3 cubic feet) in Hybrid guise. Flip down the top halves of its rear seatbacks and the Panamera will accommodate 1,339 litres (47.3 cubic feet) of longer cargo in the former and 1,246 litres (44.0 cubic feet) in the latter, while cargo improvements made by the Sport Turismo were covered earlier. 

To summarize, this has already been an exhaustive overview, but there’s still so much that could be said about the 2018 Porsche Panamera. In top trims it’s easily the sportiest sport sedan currently available, yet its style, quality, workmanship and livable practicality set it apart as one of the best cars in its category as well.

The Porsche 718 series started life as the Boxster way back in early 1996, the first of which arrived at the Geneva auto salon in March before going on sale as a 1997 model later that year. The Cayman…

2018 Porsche 718 Cayman and 718 Boxster Buyer’s Guide Overview

2018 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS
Porsche has returned with its sportiest GTS for 2018, wholly improving 718 Boxster S and 718 Cayman S style and performance. (Photo: Porsche)

The Porsche 718 series started life as the Boxster way back in early 1996, the first of which arrived at the Geneva auto salon in March before going on sale as a 1997 model later that year. The Cayman came much later, showing up in 2005 as a 2006 model along with the second-generation Boxster. 

Fast forward to 2016, which saw Porsche add the 718 prefix in honour of the classic 1957-1962 racing car of the same name for the completely redesigned 2017 model, and along with the new moniker and much improved styling the Zuffenhausen brand’s engineering team replaced an outgoing line of naturally aspirated flat sixes for a new lighter weight, more potent and more efficient horizontally opposed turbocharged four-cylinder. 

2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS
The 718 Cayman, whether in base, S or GTS trim (shown), is basically a Boxster with a fixed roof. (Photo: Porsche)

The updated 718 models use a 2.0-litre turbo for base trims, good for a robust 300 horsepower and 280 lb-ft of torque and resultant 5.1-second sprint from standstill to 100km/h with its standard six-speed manual, or 4.9 seconds to 100km/h with the optional seven-speed dual-clutch automated PDK transmission, finalizing in a top speed of 275 km/h. When fitted with the automatic, both base cars offer an available Sport Chrono Package that reduces zero to 100km/h times to just 4.7 seconds. 

2018 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS
GTS trim combines a red on black theme with plenty of leather and rich suede-like Alcantara. (Photo: Porsche)

Even the entry-level 718 is a formidable sports car thanks its reasonably small 4,379 mm by 1,801 mm dimensions, hardly heavy 1,335 kilos of unladen weight, ideally balanced mid-engine layout, quick reacting electromechanical power steering with variable steering ratio, well sorted MacPherson strut front and long-short arm multi-link rear suspension setup, standard Porsche Active Suspension Management, capable 330-mm front and 299-mm rear internally vented and cross-drilled rotors clamped down on by four-piston calipers, enhanced Porsche Stability Management featuring ABS, ASR, ABD, and an MSR pre-filling brake system with brake assist, plus amply sized 18-inch standard alloys on 235/45 and 265/45 ZR rated rubber front to rear. 

2018 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS
Porsche gives the GTS tachometer dial a sporty red spin. (Photo: Porsche)

Those wanting more performance can opt for the 718 Boxster S or 718 Cayman S, which ups engine displacement to 2.5-litres and bumps output to 350 horsepower and 309 lb-ft of torque, resulting in a new zero to 100km/h sprint time of 4.6 seconds with the manual, 4.4 seconds with the automated PDK, and 4.2 seconds with the latter transmission and Sport Chrono Package, while terminal velocity gets pushed up to 285 km/h. 

2018 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS
718 Boxster GTS gets unique sport seats with the trim level embroidered into the headrests. (Photo: Porsche)

This was the car Porsche introduced for 2017, and for the most part it’s still the same model being offered for the 2018 model year. Then again, Porsche never stands still. For 2018 the GTS trim line has been added back to the lineup, upping straight-line performance with an extra 15 horsepower over the 718 S for a total of 365 ponies, which is 35 horsepower more than the previous Boxster and Cayman GTS line. Likewise, torque is up by 8 lb-ft to 317, but only when mated to the PDK. The off-the-line result is the same 4.6 seconds from standstill to 100km/h for the manual, but the GTS PDK sprints to 100km/h in just 4.3 seconds, and a mere 4.1 seconds when upgraded with the Sport Chrono package, whereas the GTS model’s top-speed is 290 km/h no matter the modifications. 

2018 Porsche 718 Cayman S
The 718 Cayman S provides similar performance to the GTS, with slightly more understated styling. (Photo: Porsche)

Along with the extra go-power the new 718 Boxster GTS and 718 Cayman GTS get a number of features from the lesser models’ options menu as standard equipment, including a mechanical-locking rear differential, Porsche Torque Vectoring, a 10-mm lower sport suspension system with Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM), and 20-inch alloy wheels wrapped in 235/35 front and 265/35 rear ZR-rated rubber. Additionally, 718 GTS models feature unique black exterior trim, a red on black interior theme with suede-like Alcantara trim, and more unique styling. 

2018 Porsche 718 Boxster S
Can you see yourself behind the wheel of a new 718 Boxster? (Photo: Porsche)

As you might imagine the GTS isn’t the most fuel-efficient 718 on the block, but at 12.3 L/100km in the city, 9.4 on the highway and 11.0 combined for the manual, or 11.8, 9.2 and 10.6 respectively for the PDK, it’s hardly a gas-guzzler either. The base model is the thriftiest with a claimed Transport Canada five-cycle rating of 11.0 L/100km city, 8.3 highway and 9.8 combined when mated to the manual, or 10.5 city, 8.0 highway and 9.4 combined for the PDK, whereas 718 S models bridge the gap with a rating of 12.1 city, 9.0 highway and 10.7 combined with the manual, or 11.0, 8.4 and 9.9 respectively with the PDK. Aiding fuel economy is standard auto start/stop that temporarily shuts the engine off when it would otherwise be idling, and then automatically restarts it when ready to go. 

2018 Porsche 718 Boxster
This is the base 718 Boxster. Sporty enough for you? (Photo: Porsche)

As is the case with most brands and model lineups the two-door coupe 718 Cayman is the more affordable of the two, starting at just $63,700 plus freight and fees (see CarCostCanada.com for all 718 Cayman pricing, plus dealer invoice pricing and money-saving rebate info), while a 718 Boxster (click this CarCostCanada.com link for 2018 718 Boxster pricing in detail) can be had for only $66,100. The PDK adds $3,660 no matter the trim. After that the 718 Cayman S starts at $78,600 and 718 Boxster S at $81,000, while a 718 Cayman GTS can be had for $92,600 and 718 Boxster GTS for $95,000. 

2018 Porsche 718 Cayman
The base 718 Cayman offers a lot of sports car value for the asking price. (Photo: Porsche)

As with all Porsche models even the base 718 comes well equipped with features like a three-spoke leather-wrapped multifunction sport steering wheel (inspired by the 918 Spyder supercar), a 4.6-inch high-resolution colour TFT multi-info display, a state-of-the-art infotainment touchscreen and interface with stylish graphics, a backup camera with active guidelines, Bluetooth phone connectivity with streaming audio, eight-speaker 150-watt audio, sport seats with partial leather upholstery, an electromechanical parking brake, hill start assist, front and rear parking sensors, a deep and roomy 150-litre cargo compartment up front and an even larger 275-litre trunk in the back, plus much more. 

2018 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS
No matter the trim, the new 718 models provide exceptionally well made interiors with the latest in infotainment, including Apple CarPlay. (Photo: Porsche)

Above this, Porsche offers HID headlights with dynamic cornering capability for better nighttime visibility, rain-sensing wipers, auto-dimming mirrors, heatable seats, dual-zone auto climate control, navigation, 14-way powered sport seats with memory, and much, much more, plus you can personalize your 718 with one of 21 unique interiors, and that doesn’t include your ability to pick and choose through various inlay trims. Porsche offers four different types of seats, and four Premium packages, with the list of extras seeming to go on infinitum. 

2018 Porsche 718 Cayman
Porsche offers more colour and materials options than most rivals, allowing you to completely personalize your 718. (Photo: Porsche)

The biggest question you’ll need to ask yourself is whether you’re a coupe or convertible person, because each 718 body type has its advantages. The 718 Boxster can lower its roof and allow true wind-in-the-hair freedom, whereas the 718 Cayman provides a slightly more rigid body structure for some minor performance gains. 

Either way you’ll get brilliantly sharp handling, nearly perfect balance and handling characteristics, superb ergonomics, excellent comfort, and plenty of practical storage. If Porsche didn’t already build the 911, the 718 might be the ideal sports car, and considering its mid-engine performance and exceptional value proposition that point could still be reasonably argued.